avatar

silvertone

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,579 Member Since:26/01/2011

#5 [url]

Jun 19 15 6:10 AM

I agree Dave.

It's also amazing that CD technology worked at all. 8 million pits on a CD, a human hair would cover 40,000 of them. A laser is shot through a prism and broken into 3 rays one hits the bottom of the pit, one hits the land (flat operation of the disc) and the middle hits the edge and reads if it's a 1 or a 0... It even fills in the missing data. Now that is truly amazing to me as well. Now it's all ancient technology!

Quote    Reply   
avatar

viitalahde

Gold Finger

Posts: 597 Member Since:04/02/2011

#6 [url]

Jun 19 15 7:20 AM

dcollins wrote:
It's amazing it works at all.

This. I can understand a groove on a lacquer can be played back, but that the fact that a record can be played back after coating, electroplating, various stages of mothers and fathers and at last, several tens of tons of pressure on the stampers.. That is quite amazing. And it can sound great, too!

Quote    Reply   
avatar

soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,049 Member Since:04/02/2011

#7 [url]

Jun 19 15 7:26 AM

Right. It's always been one of those things-- like the flying capability of jumbo jets-- which obeys the laws of physics but seems to defy common sense. Yet it works!

brad allen williams

Quote    Reply   
avatar

jaykadis

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,392 Member Since:24/01/2011

#8 [url]

Jun 19 15 9:48 AM

The truly amazing aspect of CDs (and DATs, too) is the ability to track the data by servoing the heads on the fly. This really defies logic. Who thought they could get this to work reliably (semi-reliably for DAT)?

Quote    Reply   
avatar

silvertone

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,579 Member Since:26/01/2011

#10 [url]

Jun 19 15 6:10 PM

If anyone would appreciate having one, I'd be you Dave.

I want a small nuclear reactor to power the studio but the "yellow cake" I need for it is hard to come by... Ha ha

Quote    Reply   
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help