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jpaul bordon

Silverado

Posts: 176 Member Since:29/01/2011

#3 [url]

Jun 26 16 10:53 AM

Wow, I saw 3 videos out of the series and learned 6 things I did not know, and I have been a techie for 30 plus years. There seem to be no fat in the lecture series either. Boy, I wish I had these video's when I was 17. So much of what I learned early in life was from failures in my early years due to bad teachers that could not get a "real" job outside of the teaching arena.     My new goal is to watch one per day during my morning coffee! ---- The Internet Wows Me Again!

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Mike Rivers

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,503 Member Since:13/10/2012

#4 [url]

Jun 26 16 11:31 AM

jpaul bordon wrote:
Wow, I saw 3 videos out of the series and learned 6 things I did not know, and I have been a techie for 30 plus years.
 

Which ones did you watch? I watched a couple and got bored early on. Got any recommendations (and why)?



For a good time, call mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com

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jpaul bordon

Silverado

Posts: 176 Member Since:29/01/2011

#5 [url]

Jun 26 16 12:57 PM

I may not be as experienced as you...  so grain of salt.... 1 Replace surface mount caps without surface mount hardware. .  2 capacitor types and uses, heat related issues are 2 of the vids that gave me a handful of few nuggets.  Besides a "Possibly Canadian" accent and taking away DEM AMERICN JIBS  (insert sarcasm tone) he spoke quickly and concisely. BTW cool filming set, surrounded by test equipment ready to devour who ever sits down kinda feel Ha!

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Mike Rivers

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,503 Member Since:13/10/2012

#6 [url]

Jun 27 16 9:44 AM

jpaul bordon wrote:
Wow, I saw 3 videos out of the series and learned 6 things I did not know, and I have been a techie for 30 plus years. There seem to be no fat in the lecture series either. Boy, I wish I had these video's when I was 17.
 

When you were 17 we didn't have surface mount capacitors.  ;)  On your recommendation, I looked at the surface mount electrolytic capacitor removal video and that's a pretty neat trick. I tried it on one of my junk "SMD practice" boards and it worked nicely. I tried the same trick on small rectangular tantalum capacitors and that worked as well. You can't do that with transistors or ICs, though. Also, he has a well equipped shop. A casual tinkerer probably doesn't have a vacuum solder sucker, or even a pair of angled long nose pliers.

I've been building and repairing stuff for about 60 years, and that put me in mind of a removal technique that was common when we had "real" parts - cutting a resistor in the middle while it's still on the board makes it a lot easier to unsoder the two ends separately. The philosophy here is that if it's already broken, it doesn't hurt to break it all the way. A similar technique works with through-hole mounted ICs, where you clip the legs off right at the body and then unsolder and remove them one at a time. 

Mr. Carlson seems to enjoy working on old test and radio equipment, and one advantage to that is that there's usually good documentation available so you can do some troubleshooting before you start changing components. So much of what's on my growing "doesn't work but it's too good to throw away" shelf these days barely has a usable operator's manual - no schematics, not parts lists, no block diagrams. So even if you find an obviously blown electrolytic capacitor, you may not be able to determine what to replace it with.



For a good time, call mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com

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dcollins

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,343 Member Since:27/01/2011

#7 [url]

Jun 28 16 12:28 AM

mikerivers wrote:
jpaul bordon wrote:
Wow, I saw 3 videos out of the series and learned 6 things I did not know, and I have been a techie for 30 plus years.
 

Which ones did you watch? I watched a couple and got bored early on. Got any recommendations (and why)?
The utter mastery of the material, the custom designs, the perfect craftsmanship, the calm - dare I say Canadian demeanor.

The "I learned something new in every video" part.

I binge-watch them unapologetically.

From novice to wherever, I can't recommend them highly enough.


DC



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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,058 Member Since:20/01/2011

#8 [url]

Jun 29 16 11:14 PM

dcollins wrote:

The utter mastery of the material, the custom designs, the perfect craftsmanship, the calm - dare I say Canadian demeanor.

DC




Speaking of Canadian, Mr Carlson reminds me a bit of this guy:




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technologyworks

Gold Finger

Posts: 661 Member Since:21/02/2011

#9 [url]

Jun 30 16 4:38 PM

I binged on these too, love 'em

I'm very impressed with a couple where he comes up with a solution to a problem, runs up a quick schematic [often with surface mount parts] then etches his board and builds the project.
I did work on taking off his accent and delivery and drove my wife mad saying " allllriiight" at every possible opportunity.

Peter Beckmann

Technologyworks Mastering 

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,568 Member Since:26/01/2011

#11 [url]

Jul 1 16 7:06 AM

To someone with limited experience and no formal electronics training (me) he seems very clear and logical. I certainly couldn't build his outside foil tester for caps as a surface mount device, but I probably could do as a through-hole device. More importantly, I could follow his design, understood the 74 series device, the flip-flop, and the 555 timer circuit. I'd heard of all those things but never understood them. Clearing away the mist surrounding things I don't understand is a really pleasant thing. For the meantime, using a cable with alligator clips will work fine for me.

Does he have a video about testing caps for DC leakage?

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zenmastering

Silverado

Posts: 155 Member Since:21/02/2011

#12 [url]

Jul 3 16 1:28 AM

dcollins wrote:
Nothing compared to the EEV Blog guy. It actually affects my ability to watch it sometimes...

Indeed, the proverbial "ice-pick in the forehead."

I think he'll just explode one day.

Thanks for the Carlson links; wonderful stuff!

Graemme Brown **Zen Mastering** Gabriola, Canada 1.604.874.9096 info AT zenmastering DOT net

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barry hufker

Diamond Forever

Posts: 12,104 Member Since:26/01/2011

#15 [url]

Jul 19 16 4:08 PM

At the opposite end of the technical spectrum: I love this guy.  He is always demonstrating something interesting while (purposely I'm sure) fucking things up.  Here's a good one...

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,310 Member Since:04/02/2011

#16 [url]

Jul 21 16 11:06 AM

I've been watching a lot of these, and learning a lot.

This is a very interesting demonstration-- a comparison of a gas regulator tube and a zener diode at various operating temperatures. Impressive, and educational! (scroll forward to 26:52)




 

brad allen williams

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djcook

Tin Man

Posts: 25 Member Since:10/02/2011

#17 [url]

Jul 22 16 8:09 AM

barry hufker wrote:
At the opposite end of the technical spectrum: I love this guy.  He is always demonstrating something interesting while (purposely I'm sure) fucking things up.  Here's a good one...
 

Now THAT is more my level. Mr. Carlson is way over my head, and it's nothing to do with his being Canadian.
Thanks!

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,058 Member Since:20/01/2011

#18 [url]

Jul 22 16 2:19 PM

soapfoot wrote:
I've been watching a lot of these, and learning a lot.

This is a very interesting demonstration-- a comparison of a gas regulator tube and a zener diode at various operating temperatures. Impressive, and educational! (scroll forward to 26:52)




 
Love how he mispronounciates "Zener" as "Zenner", makes it seem more "at one"...!

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