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weedywet

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Posts: 5,960 Member Since: 20/01/2011

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Jan 22 17 5:02 PM

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I know... I'm being cranky. 

But, the current US trend is toward a particular phoneme, a vowel sound like 'ah' 

where words that might regionally be pronounced with an 'aw' or 'oh' sound are drifting toward that 'aw' instead. And SELF CONSCIOUSLY so. 
As though it's been somehow "decided" that it sounds more educated or classy to use the 'ah' sound. 

So cough and stalk and chocolate and office, become Chahcolate and Stahk and Cahff and AHfiss


and if that's your natural accent that's great. 
(Although I'm not so sure ALL of those words would be said that way naturally anywhere)

but what is driving me crazy is hearing someone on tv say "so you melt the CHAHcolate in a double boiler, and then you pour the CHOHcolate out onto a cool surface, and then sort of spread that CHAWcolate around until..."

you can HEAR them struggling TRYING to adopt an accent that's clearly not theirs. 
And saying the word 3 ways in 30 seconds. 

I find it so distracting that I literally lose track of WHAT they are saying

it's making you sound phony and awkward. 
Not "classy" or "educated". 

Thus endeth the rant
 
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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,639 Member Since:26/01/2011

#2 [url]

Jan 22 17 6:56 PM

Martha Stewart does that a lot. It's a bit distracting to hear her say "little" with very delicate pointed 't's (lit-tull), then a few sentences later say "liddle" with swallowed 't's like most people. OK, so I watch Martha Stewart, sue me! Pardon me, moi...

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ssltech

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Posts: 4,058 Member Since:22/01/2011

#3 [url]

Jan 22 17 9:24 PM

I have noticed the same thing.

I wonder if I'm being petty, but then I think that the correct pronunciation of a word tes you SO much about its source, its history, and what it MEANS.

Then Americans (in general... and may Brits too -sadly-) generally do seem to have developed a "what does it matter" viewpoint, which is rather unfortunate, because as a result they don't know what they're missing.

The tendency of white, middle-class Americans to name their kids with surnames-as-first-names... and then mispronounce them... is aggravating.

(sigh)... I should probably take my blood pressure medication and go and lie down. -Note; NOT "lay" down.

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John Eppstein

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,274 Member Since:31/05/2015

#5 [url]

Jan 23 17 1:49 AM

weedywet wrote:
I know... I'm being cranky. 

But, the current US trend is toward a particular phoneme, a vowel sound like 'ah' 

where words that might regionally be pronounced with an 'aw' or 'oh' sound are drifting toward that 'aw' instead. And SELF CONSCIOUSLY so. 
As though it's been somehow "decided" that it sounds more educated or classy to use the 'ah' sound. 

So cough and stalk and chocolate and office, become Chahcolate and Stahk and Cahff and AHfiss


and if that's your natural accent that's great. 
(Although I'm not so sure ALL of those words would be said that way naturally anywhere)

but what is driving me crazy is hearing someone on tv say "so you melt the CHAHcolate in a double boiler, and then you pour the CHOHcolate out onto a cool surface, and then sort of spread that CHAWcolate around until..."

you can HEAR them struggling TRYING to adopt an accent that's clearly not theirs. 
And saying the word 3 ways in 30 seconds. 

I find it so distracting that I literally lose track of WHAT they are saying

it's making you sound phony and awkward. 
Not "classy" or "educated". 

Thus endeth the rant

 

Didn't you mean to say "Clahssy"?

And eddicated?

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,406 Member Since:04/02/2011

#6 [url]

Jan 23 17 8:45 AM

does anyone have a video of what we're talking about? I haven't noticed, and I'm trying to imagine it in my mind, and... well, I haven't noticed.

I will say there are many legitimate REGIONAL differences in the way words are pronounced.

Sometimes I'll hear a word and the pronounciation will be distracting to me, and then I'll realize the program was produced in Canada. "Robutt" instead of "robot," for example.

brad allen williams

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,639 Member Since:26/01/2011

#7 [url]

Jan 23 17 10:02 AM

Check out a few episodes of Martha Stewart's cooking show on the Create network. It happens they're pretty good as cooking shows go. You really have to listen carefully, but sometimes she will pronounce a word with a kind of cultivated, prissy diction that sounds a little forced to me, and sometimes she will pronounce the same word like someone from Nutley, New Jersey, which she is. I mostly hear it on her "t"s.

The actress Carol Channing used to do a bit about her alma mater, Bennington College, where you were either a "Dahnce and Dramma" major, or a "Drahma and Dannce" major. When I was a kid Americans had "aunts", like ants. Only English people had "Ahnts". Now Americans have them too.

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Cirrus

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Posts: 46 Member Since:08/12/2014

#8 [url]

Jan 23 17 10:36 AM

I don't really know about American regional accents, but as a Scottish kid who spent three years in Oz and mostly grew up in southern England, before going to uni up in Yorkshire where no one can say "the" and now living in Birmingham (alriiight, yalm? Auuummme frum buuuuuurminghummmm" )... My accent's stupid, and I think I'd give most people a pass.

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gtoledo3

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Posts: 4,190 Member Since:23/10/2013

#10 [url]

Jan 23 17 10:47 AM

A couple of days back, there was some debate on one of the network morning shows about whether or not envelope is pronounced -

n - velope

or

on - velope

Sign of the times?

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,960 Member Since:20/01/2011

#11 [url]

Jan 23 17 1:41 PM

I don't "mind" anyone's actual regional accent; or, certainly speaking from experience!, anyone's hybridized (or mongrelized) accent (and for the record, i am allowing autocorrect to replace all the s's i'm typing in those words with z's! a :regional" choice!)...
mine is certainly 'transatlantic'

but what I'm objecting to, and finding distracting to the point of irritation, is the conscious choice to pronounce some vowel sounds in a way the speaker perceives as 'more correct' or 'classy'

I can hear the straining to force the word into the newspeak pronunciation. And that's why I often hear those people 'slip' mid paragraph and end up saying the word two or three different ways.

Anthony Bourdain does not 'naturally' or comfortably pronounce "office" as AHfiss.... but he FORCES himself to try to say it that way.. and the result is it just sounds weird.

CAHfee, for coffee, is another one I hear increasingly creeping into otherwise northeast accents where it's completely odd sounding.

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digitmus

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Posts: 394 Member Since:01/02/2011

#13 [url]

Jan 23 17 3:38 PM

soapfoot wrote:
My elementary school principal pronounced "envelope" exactly the same as "envelope" the verb

Yeah, it really bugs me when people put the emPHAsis on the wrong sylLABle...

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gtoledo3

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Posts: 4,190 Member Since:23/10/2013

#14 [url]

Jan 23 17 4:05 PM

soapfoot wrote:
My elementary school principal pronounced "envelope" exactly the same as "envelope" the verb

One of my high school English professors would very consciously pronounce all foreign words with English phonetics, and maintained that this was a valid approach in proper English.

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,639 Member Since:26/01/2011

#15 [url]

Jan 23 17 6:19 PM

I had a high school history teacher who pronounced the word "treatise" as "treatsie". Seriously. He just never looked at it carefully. It took me a long time to learn to pronounce "chimera" correctly. It's not a word one encounters a lot. Not where I hang, anyway...

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,960 Member Since:20/01/2011

#16 [url]

Jan 23 17 7:28 PM

soapfoot wrote:
My elementary school principal pronounced "envelope" exactly the same as "envelope" the verb

 
do you mean as opposed to the French-ified version?

I say EN-velope  not AHNvelope.*
but did he say enVELup?
that would be odd.

*I grew up not Frenching-up a lot of words Americans do...fillet, buffet with the t's..or foyer with the r not foyAY, etc.

 

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,960 Member Since:20/01/2011

#18 [url]

Jan 23 17 10:13 PM

That's not regional. That's just dumb. 

I'm watching the Australian Open and find myself wondering what a "ternamint" is. 

Perhaps I'll figure it out when I'm on a ter bus

Last Edited By: weedywet Jan 23 17 11:05 PM. Edited 1 time.

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,517 Member Since:27/01/2011

#19 [url]

Jan 23 17 10:26 PM

I know what you mean but accents are always changing. How many New Yorker's do you know that pronounce Broadway with the accent on the second syllable? No one younger than 75.

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