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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,145 Member Since:23/01/2011

#1 [url]

Feb 15 17 9:35 AM

A friend of mine who lives in Burlingame has been telling me about this building for a year or more.  He said that it doesn't seem all that huge until you start driving around it and then you realize how massive it is.  He has also expressed A LOT of concern about how it's going to effect freeway traffic, which he says is already totally out of control for other reasons.  

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morespaceecho

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Posts: 2,323 Member Since:29/01/2011

#2 [url]

Feb 15 17 3:53 PM

i find this profoundly irritating: 

"In the US, the tolerances permitted for construction measurements—how much leeway there is between what measurements a builder is working toward, and what they’ve actually cut—are usually about an eighth of an inch. According to Reuters, Apple asked for still more precise measurements, even for things that employees wouldn’t be able to see."

an 1/8" is ok for the rest of the world, but WE'RE APPLE it has to be a 1/16". ffs. no wonder the first contracting team walked.




 

www.oldcolonymastering.com

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,145 Member Since:23/01/2011

#3 [url]

Feb 15 17 6:39 PM

morespaceecho wrote:
i find this profoundly irritating: 

"In the US, the tolerances permitted for construction measurements—how much leeway there is between what measurements a builder is working toward, and what they’ve actually cut—are usually about an eighth of an inch. According to Reuters, Apple asked for still more precise measurements, even for things that employees wouldn’t be able to see."

an 1/8" is ok for the rest of the world, but WE'RE APPLE it has to be a 1/16". ffs. no wonder the first contracting team walked.





 

 
In a building that size, I wonder if it may have something to do with preventing earthquake damage.  

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John Eppstein

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Posts: 1,273 Member Since:31/05/2015

#4 [url]

Feb 15 17 8:52 PM

maarvold wrote:

morespaceecho wrote:
i find this profoundly irritating: 

"In the US, the tolerances permitted for construction measurements—how much leeway there is between what measurements a builder is working toward, and what they’ve actually cut—are usually about an eighth of an inch. According to Reuters, Apple asked for still more precise measurements, even for things that employees wouldn’t be able to see."

an 1/8" is ok for the rest of the world, but WE'RE APPLE it has to be a 1/16". ffs. no wonder the first contracting team walked.






 

 
In a building that size, I wonder if it may have something to do with preventing earthquake damage.  

I very seriously doubt it.

I think it has a lot more to do with psychosis.

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morespaceecho

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Posts: 2,323 Member Since:29/01/2011

#6 [url]

Feb 16 17 9:01 AM

hands on and intense is great, this just seems like good old fashioned arrogance. masters of the universe insisting on everything being JUST SO, because they can afford it.

why do the parts of the ceiling tiles NO ONE WILL EVER SEE need to be as perfectly polished as the visible side? it's a stupid waste of time and money. sure it's their money to waste and they can do what they like, but they coulda built a really super nice normal building and spent the rest on a nice community park or established scholarships or something.

www.oldcolonymastering.com

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,145 Member Since:23/01/2011

#8 [url]

Feb 16 17 10:20 AM

morespaceecho wrote:
...why do the parts of the ceiling tiles NO ONE WILL EVER SEE need to be as perfectly polished as the visible side? it's a stupid waste of time and money. sure it's their money to waste and they can do what they like, but they coulda built a really super nice normal building and spent the rest on a nice community park or established scholarships or something.

 
On the potentially negative side, isn't this just kind of a microcosm analogy for a lot of what appears to be going on in our lives right now?  Or, on the potentially positive side, it's just a really big example of someone, or some entity, doing something to the nth degree--kind of like what George Massenburg did with the acoustics in Blackbird Studio C.  I applaud what George did because he took a concept 'all the way to the end of the line' and now those who have worked there now know what that might mean--it's the only real way to find out.  I personally hope to spend time in that room someday because I want to know for myself.  

Last Edited By: maarvold Feb 16 17 10:27 AM. Edited 1 time.

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ktownson

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,185 Member Since:22/01/2011

#9 [url]

Feb 16 17 10:30 AM

waltzmastering wrote:
It will be interesting to see how they get the rainforest in there.


image





 

 image

Is it just me, or...

 
image

"Kerry fixed the stereo, and now it doesn't work." (My six-year-old sister)

Last Edited By: ktownson Feb 17 17 10:18 AM. Edited 2 times.

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morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,323 Member Since:29/01/2011

#10 [url]

Feb 16 17 10:35 AM

i mean, i'm all for doing shit right, i like perfect as much as anyone else, but this just seems way over the top. 

i bet you 1/8" tolerance was good enough for blackbird. you know when you make the "tiniest little bit" gesture with your thumb and index finger? that's an 1/8".

they probably insisted that the backs of the cupboards in the kitchen be stained too. "but, sir...they're going against the wall and will never be seen." "I INSIST ON PERFECT! STAIN THEM!"

for the record, i'm hurling this invective from ms mse's macbook air, and it is a delightful machine.

www.oldcolonymastering.com

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,680 Member Since:14/02/2011

#11 [url]

Feb 16 17 10:41 AM

I would love to check the building out. Coming from a place where they slap housing and buildings up with the thought that they are disposable, I applaud them on this. Most of the buildings here will be gone in 35 years. That building looks like it's in for the long haul.

It's their vision, their money.

I think all designers and builders should aspire to this.

I love it.

OK it's cold here

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gtoledo3

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,186 Member Since:23/10/2013

#13 [url]

Feb 16 17 1:19 PM

I like the idea of such a painstaking process, of people bending over backwards to try to do something in the best way that they can, even when people might not be able to see it.

It seems like the currently prized ideal is, that if you can somehow take a shortcut or cheat and wind up at the finish line first, you are even SMARTER.

Maybe so, maybe not, but it sure isn't proving to be functional when that idea gains currency and everyone holds that up as the new ideal.

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morespaceecho

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Posts: 2,323 Member Since:29/01/2011

#14 [url]

Feb 16 17 2:23 PM

must just be me then.

to me, not worrying about stuff that doesn't matter doesn't equal cheating or taking a shortcut, it equals simple common sense.

but since i aspire to greatness i'll be sure to stain the underside of my floorboards before putting them down in the new studio.

www.oldcolonymastering.com

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,145 Member Since:23/01/2011

#18 [url]

Feb 16 17 5:49 PM

jzombie wrote:
could also be a van halen "no brown m&ms" type of thing - ensuring the contractors work will be done to a high standard.

I heard the 'no brown M&Ms thing was so they could instantly tell if anyone had even read their rider.  

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scullyfan

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Posts: 1,612 Member Since:27/07/2011

#19 [url]

Feb 16 17 7:03 PM

I know a little bit about trying to do work to a certain degree of precision that few, if any, will ever see. Data cabling needs to have its own support structure, like ladder tray or J-hooks, but these systems are usually hidden above a suspended ceiling. For some inexplicable reason I actually used to measure the exact position of each hanger so that they were at regular intervals and at the same distance from the actual ceiling. When architects started designing clearstory buildings that exposed all of the mechanicals and cabling, I noticed some craftspeople struggle a little with the notion that their work would no longer be hidden. I just did my normal routine. Guess whose work looked the best?

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jimlongo

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Posts: 630 Member Since:28/01/2011

#20 [url]

Feb 16 17 7:05 PM

Paul Jobs was a mechanic, good with his hands and intelligent with his work, which largely focused on cars and then constructing metal parts for laser assemblies in Silicon Valley.“

I thought my dad’s sense of design was pretty good,” Jobs told Isaacson, “because he knew how to build anything. If we needed a cabinet, he would build it. When he built our fence, he gave me a hammer so I could work with him.” 

Fifty years after the fence was constructed, Jobs showed it to Isaacson, still standing and recalled a lesson about making things of quality that he learned from his father. Touching the boards of inside of the fence, he said that “He loved doing things right. He even cared about the look of the parts you couldn’t see.” 

He said that his father refused to use poor wood for the back of cabinets, or to build a fence that wasn’t constructed as well on the back side as it was the front. Jobs likened it to using a piece of plywood on the back of a beautiful chest of drawers. “For you to sleep well at night, the aesthetic, the quality, has to be carried all the way through.”

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