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chance

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,665 Member Since:30/01/2011

#201 [url]

Mar 15 17 10:48 PM

I just sent a shout out to James Burton. Maybe he might care to add some input here. His first electric was the Telecaster. and Yes, he did live with the Nelsons for 2 years. (Never knew that) We were trying to figure what years he played with Roy Orbison. When Roy had his band called "The Webs", Bobby Goldsboro was playing bass, but then he (BG) had a hit called "Funny little Clown", and had to make some appearances, so I got to play a few gigs around Chicago with Roy and maybe James. We're still trying to get the time frames together. We both have CRS

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,583 Member Since:26/01/2011

#202 [url]

Mar 16 17 8:17 AM

I think we're giving too much credit to the guitar. It's the guy playing the guitar that defines the sound. Put one guy's best tool in someone else's hands and it could be great or a disaster. There is no 'perfect guitar,' although to my mind the tele comes closest.

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wireline

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,121 Member Since:24/01/2011

#203 [url]

Mar 16 17 8:57 AM

zmix wrote:

soapfoot wrote:A Thinline is a different animal for sure. "Telecaster" in name only, sort of how a Les Paul junior is very different from a Les Paul standard, but very much a valid instrument in its own right.

I don't know... the original 1968/69 is virtually identical except the shape of the pickguard and the f-hole...

I'm working with an artist who has 4-5 great teles, including a 1968 Thinline it's virtually identical to his 1966 tele.. except that it it has F tuners that are nickel...

Thank you! There are some really GREAT sounding thin lines out there. They can honky tonk with the best of em.

Ive always had a soft spot for the thinline you describe, pup setup exactly like any other tele, but hollow with an F hole. 

Ken Morgan

Please...Give It A Rest

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,069 Member Since:20/01/2011

#204 [url]

Mar 17 17 10:12 AM

I acquired and installed a bridge cover on my Telecaster... in spite of the internet rumors, I measured an INCREASE in output from the bridge pickup of several dB, and also the "sensitivity" was increased dramatically.. when finger picking the guitar now sounds exactly like a lapsteel.. when I remove the cover the tone is much thinner and flatter, less rich and with a less firm "footing", if you know what I mean...

Even placing the cover over the pickup while a note is sustaining causes an audible increase in level...

Not subtle, either...

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,106 Member Since:23/01/2011

#205 [url]

Mar 17 17 10:27 AM

I'm not kidding when I say I love when people actually try stuff, then report on how it worked out.  There's nothing like actual first hand experience.  

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,323 Member Since:04/02/2011

#206 [url]

Mar 17 17 10:37 AM

zmix wrote:
I acquired and installed a bridge cover on my Telecaster... in spite of the internet rumors, I measured an INCREASE in output from the bridge pickup of several dB, and also the "sensitivity" was increased dramatically.. when finger picking the guitar now sounds exactly like a lapsteel.. when I remove the cover the tone is much thinner and flatter, less rich and with a less firm "footing", if you know what I mean...

Even placing the cover over the pickup while a note is sustaining causes an audible increase in level...

Not subtle, either...

I never heard an allegation of a change one way or the other, so this is interesting.

However, I think most players' complaint about the bridge cover is that it impedes right-hand muting technique. I certainly cannot play "as usual" with the bridge cover on my 1968 Tele, so it lives in the case pocket where (IMO) it belongs.

Other disadvantages of the bridge cover: it makes the point of the pick fall in an unnatural location, and it puts the right hand too far away to do volume swells with the pinky.

brad allen williams

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,106 Member Since:23/01/2011

#207 [url]

Mar 17 17 10:56 AM

soapfoot wrote:
...and it puts the right hand too far away to do volume swells with the pinky.

Isn't that what s Sho Bud volume pedal is for?  Although I didn't use the pickup cover on my Tele, the Sho Bud did get a fair amount of use: I always felt it was much more expressive and accurate than my pinky (which also pulled my right hand out of the position I wanted to be in).  I even built a Dan Armstrong Orange Squeezer into my Tele in a quest for better 'fake pedal steel' sounds.  

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/201837075461?lpid=82&chn=ps&ul_noapp=true
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Dan-Armstrong-Orange-Squeezer-Compressor-Guitar-Effects-Pedal-/162434555372?hash=item25d1da9dec:g:ProAAOSwA3dYQSD7

Mike Stern later bought that Tele; I sold it in East Coast Guitars in Harvard Square on consignment.  I can't help wondering if he ever figured out that the Orange Squeezer was what was in there. It was definitely not stock in several different ways.  

 

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,069 Member Since:20/01/2011

#208 [url]

Mar 17 17 12:26 PM

soapfoot wrote:
zmix wrote:
I acquired and installed a bridge cover on my Telecaster... in spite of the internet rumors, I measured an INCREASE in output from the bridge pickup of several dB, and also the "sensitivity" was increased dramatically.. when finger picking the guitar now sounds exactly like a lapsteel.. when I remove the cover the tone is much thinner and flatter, less rich and with a less firm "footing", if you know what I mean...

Even placing the cover over the pickup while a note is sustaining causes an audible increase in level...

Not subtle, either...

I never heard an allegation of a change one way or the other, so this is interesting.

However, I think most players' complaint about the bridge cover is that it impedes right-hand muting technique. I certainly cannot play "as usual" with the bridge cover on my 1968 Tele, so it lives in the case pocket where (IMO) it belongs.

Other disadvantages of the bridge cover: it makes the point of the pick fall in an unnatural location, and it puts the right hand too far away to do volume swells with the pinky.

Well, unlike most people (apparently) I like an instrument that challenges me to approach it differently, forces me to learn what *it* has to say, rather than the systematic bludgeoning into mediocrity that is peer / committee  enforced homogeneity...  


Vive la difference..!



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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,323 Member Since:04/02/2011

#209 [url]

Mar 17 17 1:22 PM

zmix wrote:

soapfoot wrote:
zmix wrote:I acquired and installed a bridge cover on my Telecaster... in spite of the internet rumors, I measured an INCREASE in output from the bridge pickup of several dB, and also the "sensitivity" was increased dramatically.. when finger picking the guitar now sounds exactly like a lapsteel.. when I remove the cover the tone is much thinner and flatter, less rich and with a less firm "footing", if you know what I mean...


Even placing the cover over the pickup while a note is sustaining causes an audible increase in level...


Not subtle, either...

I never heard an allegation of a change one way or the other, so this is interesting.


However, I think most players' complaint about the bridge cover is that it impedes right-hand muting technique. I certainly cannot play "as usual" with the bridge cover on my 1968 Tele, so it lives in the case pocket where (IMO) it belongs.


Other disadvantages of the bridge cover: it makes the point of the pick fall in an unnatural location, and it puts the right hand too far away to do volume swells with the pinky.

Well, unlike most people (apparently) I like an instrument that challenges me to approach it differently, forces me to learn what *it* has to say, rather than the systematic bludgeoning into mediocrity that is peer / committee  enforced homogeneity...  


Vive la difference..!

Well, I mean, me too... 

I just like to be able to play it.

brad allen williams

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hank alrich

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,745 Member Since:28/01/2011

#210 [url]

Mar 17 17 1:47 PM

waltzmastering wrote:
Curious if anyone is liking the Fender Tele Thinlines?


image

Carolyn Wonderland plays the living squadoodle out of one of those.

hank alrich
http://hankandshaidrimusic.com/
http://www.youtube.com/walkinaymusic

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waltzmastering

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,639 Member Since:02/02/2011

#211 [url]

Mar 17 17 1:48 PM

maarvold wrote:


Mike Stern later bought that Tele; I sold it in East Coast Guitars in Harvard Square on consignment.  I can't help wondering if he ever figured out that the Orange Squeezer was what was in there. It was definitely not stock in several different ways.  


 

Is that natural/maple neck and black pick guard?  I've seen him with Jaco a couple times (Ryles, J Swifts). 
Seems like he used to shift gears during the solos sometimes, which probably explains the orange sqeeze

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hank alrich

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,745 Member Since:28/01/2011

#212 [url]

Mar 17 17 2:10 PM

soapfoot wrote:

zmix wrote:
I acquired and installed a bridge cover on my Telecaster... in spite of the internet rumors, I measured an INCREASE in output from the bridge pickup of several dB, and also the "sensitivity" was increased dramatically.. when finger picking the guitar now sounds exactly like a lapsteel.. when I remove the cover the tone is much thinner and flatter, less rich and with a less firm "footing", if you know what I mean...

Even placing the cover over the pickup while a note is sustaining causes an audible increase in level...

Not subtle, either...

I never heard an allegation of a change one way or the other, so this is interesting.

However, I think most players' complaint about the bridge cover is that it impedes right-hand muting technique. I certainly cannot play "as usual" with the bridge cover on my 1968 Tele, so it lives in the case pocket where (IMO) it belongs.

Other disadvantages of the bridge cover: it makes the point of the pick fall in an unnatural location, and it puts the right hand too far away to do volume swells with the pinky.

[left]Bill Kirchen flips the switch and pot plate around to place the volume knob closer.

[url=

hank alrich
http://hankandshaidrimusic.com/
http://www.youtube.com/walkinaymusic

Last Edited By: hank alrich Mar 17 17 2:15 PM. Edited 2 times.

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,106 Member Since:23/01/2011

#213 [url]

Mar 17 17 3:04 PM

waltzmastering wrote:

maarvold wrote:


Mike Stern later bought that Tele; I sold it in East Coast Guitars in Harvard Square on consignment.  I can't help wondering if he ever figured out that the Orange Squeezer was what was in there. It was definitely not stock in several different ways.  





 

Is that natural/maple neck and black pick guard?  I've seen him with Jaco a couple times (Ryles, J Swifts). 
Seems like he used to shift gears during the solos sometimes, which probably explains the orange sqeeze

 
I heard the one of mine that he bought was stolen.  It was a very uncharacteristic Tele--it came from Fender (I worked at a music store at the time) with a super heavy [what appeared to be] curly maple body/clear finish.  I stuck the Orange Squeezer toggle switch between the 2 pots and that would definitively identify the guitar I would think.  Neal Thompson (Aerosmith and East Coast Guitars) refretted the neck with big, fat, tall frets and did what I think he called a butterscotch finish on the neck, which made it look much older; Neal also put a different decal on the headstock, which gave it the same look/logo as older Fenders.  There was actually an authentic Broadcaster string tree on it (which a friend, who convinced me to have Neal do the neck, donated).  I can't remember if I put a bakelite pickguard on it or not... it was probably a stock black one.  I think you can see it of the cover of Guitar Player the first time Mike was on the cover.  It also had a Bill Lawrence--I think in the bridge--and I can't remember for sure, but some kind of PAF repro in the neck... maybe a Seymore Duncan, if he was making them back then.  But I think it must have been stolen pretty early on because I did a search and can't find any pictures of it.  Guessing, this probably would have been in around 1978-80 that he bought it.  And it was 'so many guitars ago' that I can't remember for sure if I put the humbucker in it or not, but it seems like a thing I might well have done back then.  These days I probably would want it on the bridge (I think the Bill Lawrence was a humbucking design though).  

Last Edited By: maarvold Mar 17 17 3:09 PM. Edited 1 time.

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barkleymckay

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,339 Member Since:22/01/2011

#215 [url]

Mar 17 17 4:11 PM

Absolutely re needing to wrestle with it and accept it for what it is. It makes me focus more!
I love my 1983 JV that I've had since 1993. A great sounding player though I swapped out the bridge with a SD and put compensating bridge saddles on it.
Its also very pretty...
image

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oof.lucasmicrophone

Silverado

Posts: 91 Member Since:24/01/2014

#217 [url]

Mar 17 17 4:24 PM

well, i was smart enough to buy this old tele a while ago, but apparently not smart enough to:
1. figure out how to play it not-sideways
2.how to add a picture to a post and add some text as well.

this fella's been one of my main guitars- maple cap neck stays in tune so well and well, it just feels like music when you play it.

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playon

New Forum Friend

Posts: 1 Member Since:10/03/2011

#220 [url]

Mar 17 17 9:44 PM

image

My main guitar for almost 20 years.  Sold it when it became worth too much money to play in clubs.  Now owned by Steven Segal, unfortunately, who can't play worth a damn.

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