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trock.lucasmicrophone

Gold Finger

Posts: 361 Member Since:11/10/2013

#21 [url]

Mar 13 17 1:18 PM

When I got this guitar I had never had active EMG pickups before, i actually dont knwo anything about them. how they are made and why they seem to be mostly for metal etc?

I thought I could just back off n the volume or use a pedal or something and just get eh sound I wanted, but that hasn't happened so they must be very different?

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,399 Member Since:04/02/2011

#22 [url]

Mar 13 17 6:49 PM

I don't think the EMGs were originally exclusively for metal... it just so happened that most other players lost interest after the 1980s, and they chose to focus on the one market who still was buying them.

brad allen williams

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,541 Member Since:24/03/2013

#23 [url]

Mar 14 17 1:25 AM

It seems to me that they were popular with a lot of players in different genres who liked sustainy, compressed sounds. Possibly also related to the 4-foot-tall effects racks those guys were plugging their EMG-equipped guitars into.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,399 Member Since:04/02/2011

#24 [url]

Mar 14 17 9:46 AM

I always enjoyed this video from 1988. In addition to really enjoying the record, it is pretty much impossible to look at this and not KNOW it was 1988 exactly.

- EMGs on the strat
- Ken Smith 6 string bass (behind that guy doing those goofy, spastic dance moves)
- FET 47s on all three female vocalists
- Ground-control-to-major-tom Airplane pilot headphones
- Huge China cymbal the drummer probably had to stand up to hit
- Yamaha DX7
- SSL 4000 that must've been BRAND new, because it had the plasma meters (which I believe weren't introduced 'til '87 or '88)

brad allen williams

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gtoledo3

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,172 Member Since:23/10/2013

#25 [url]

Mar 14 17 10:41 AM

They do sort of offset the sound of thin strings a bit. And if you put thicker strings on an EMG equipped guitar, it can often sound really off.

Play into one of the washy distortions that was popular in the 80s.... Metal Zone, or RAT, etc., and the frequency response of the EMGs can maybe add the feeling of more "articulation".
--

The Womack&Womack makes me think of how the Aretha record from 86 is said to have used a U47fet on lead vocals.

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,165 Member Since:20/01/2011

#26 [url]

Mar 15 17 7:33 AM

As George, Brad, Seth and others have stated a pickup can change the way you approach the instrument, what painters refer to as "attack" and this change can really transform your relationship with an instrument.   I've removed active pickups from every guitar and bass I've owned that has them..  I can't recommend passive electronics enough..

Here's a guitar that people usually have reservations about, but I removed the active EMG-85s and put in these humbucker size P-90s.

This combination has created an entirely new instrument for me:


5295909b46a9d4.88278524_r.jpg

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,165 Member Since:20/01/2011

#27 [url]

Mar 15 17 8:00 AM

trock wrote:
When I got this guitar I had never had active EMG pickups before, i actually dont knwo anything about them. how they are made and why they seem to be mostly for metal etc?

I thought I could just back off n the volume or use a pedal or something and just get eh sound I wanted, but that hasn't happened so they must be very different?

The first Strat I built as a kid from mail order parts had the original "Overland" active pickups, which were the color of a  Bandaid and had a large raised "EMG" moulded across the entire surface of the pickup.  These were touted as the ultimate in sensitivity, low noise and "fidelity", and had none of the filtering used in later EMGs to color the sound (and specifically to emulate the response of passive pickups), in fact the resonant peak of the coils was somewhere around 22kHz, and the response below that was completely flat.  These pickups sound exactly like a guitar string.

Exactly. Like. A. Guitar.  String.    

About 15 years later I put in a variety of passive Strat pickups...   The instrument went from "sounding like a guitar string" to *feeling* like your favorite baseball mitt..

Modern EMGs are popular with "metal" because of the the incredible amount of gain those players use.  The EMG have such low noise and complete lack of microphonics.

Years later I was looking into humbucker replacements and I tried dozens of available pickups, my favorites at the time were the Gibson AII "PAF" style (490s?) and  - believe it or not - the passive EMG "Select" humbuckers, which I ultimately went with, putting those into a different Steinberger.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,399 Member Since:04/02/2011

#28 [url]

Mar 15 17 8:38 AM

Yes, it's funny, it took several decades of pushing toward "higher fidelity" for the industry to realize that "high fidelity" was never the appeal of the electric-guitar-and-amplifier system.

brad allen williams

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,629 Member Since:26/01/2011

#29 [url]

Mar 15 17 9:05 AM

Strats with EMGs were big in the studios in the '80s, particularly among the younger players. They were clean, not noisy, and a good guitar player could use them as a basis for all kinds of good sounds. Sadowsky guitars, John Suhr when he was in New York, ESP and other makers all used EMGs. I had a Sadowsky bass with EMGs and his preamp, which I loved and regret selling. It was a time and it ended. It wasn't bad as 'fads' go but I don't miss it.

Last Edited By: seth Mar 15 17 9:37 AM. Edited 1 time.

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trock.lucasmicrophone

Gold Finger

Posts: 361 Member Since:11/10/2013

#30 [url]

Mar 15 17 11:37 AM

@zmix - great info and thanks! you nailed it exactly how i am perceiving them.

When i got the guitar it was a shame because color aside which appealed to me alot the playability was really nice on it. I am excited to change it up and possibly end up with my fav sound and playing guitar.

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,541 Member Since:24/03/2013

#32 [url]

Mar 16 17 1:22 AM

Wait... Chuck. Didn't you say in the Telecaster thread that you took a while to warm up to Telecasters because you thought they were unsexy? And then casually let it be known over here that you have MORE THAN ONE STEINBERGER?

Well.

Last Edited By: jesse decarlo Mar 16 17 1:26 AM. Edited 1 time.

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,165 Member Since:20/01/2011

#34 [url]

Mar 16 17 7:22 AM

Dead Sexy..!!!

I have THREE of them... (one is a "Hohner" which is a wooden copy - maple neck-through with pine "wings", but the other two are cast carbon fiber in epoxy resin)...

I hope you realize that Ned Steinberger received several international design awards for his Guitar and Bass.... the Telecaster?

Not so much....

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,399 Member Since:04/02/2011

#35 [url]

Mar 16 17 7:55 AM

It's interesting, and raises an interesting meta-question of "what constitutes technological advancement?" Is something more advanced (as opposed to just 'different') because it's newer? Because it solves a problem? Or because it proves over time to have been an important development?

History seems to have borne out that the Telecaster was a mature technology right away. Steinberger's revolutionary-seeming advancements (of both form AND function) ultimately fell by the mainstream's wayside.

Edsels had a push-button gear shifting mechanism that seemed revolutionary at the time, too. But ultimately the good old stick shift won.

brad allen williams

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,541 Member Since:24/03/2013

#36 [url]

Mar 16 17 10:42 AM

zmix wrote:
Dead Sexy..!!!

I have THREE of them... (one is a "Hohner" which is a wooden copy - maple neck-through with pine "wings", but the other two are cast carbon fiber in epoxy resin)...

I hope you realize that Ned Steinberger received several international design awards for his Guitar and Bass.... the Telecaster?

Not so much....

It is part of my ethos to allow people to define "sexy" however they like.

However I must point out that Paul Müller won the Nobel prize for discovering the insecticidal properties of DDT.

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,541 Member Since:24/03/2013

#37 [url]

Mar 16 17 10:50 AM

soapfoot wrote:
I always enjoyed this video from 1988. In addition to really enjoying the record, it is pretty much impossible to look at this and not KNOW it was 1988 exactly.

- EMGs on the strat
- Ken Smith 6 string bass (behind that guy doing those goofy, spastic dance moves)
- FET 47s on all three female vocalists
- Ground-control-to-major-tom Airplane pilot headphones
- Huge China cymbal the drummer probably had to stand up to hit
- Yamaha DX7
- SSL 4000 that must've been BRAND new, because it had the plasma meters (which I believe weren't introduced 'til '87 or '88)

You forgot to mention the engineer's epic mullet.

But anyway, a pretty awesome time capsule all around.

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gtoledo3

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,172 Member Since:23/10/2013

#38 [url]

Mar 16 17 11:09 AM

I wouldn't mind having a steinberger with the transtrem system to add to the collection. Seems like it would be kinda cool to be able to quickly drop down a 1/2 step (or whatever).

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waltzmastering

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,660 Member Since:02/02/2011

#40 [url]

Mar 16 17 11:50 AM

gtoledo3 wrote:
I wouldn't mind having a steinberger with the transtrem system
 


One thing I found with the Steinbergers, like a V, is they can be a hassle to play sitting down. 
Holdsworth, Winter, and Cuccurullo played Steinberger.
EMG's were too smooth, linear, compressy for me.

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