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d gauss

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,259 Member Since:17/02/2011

#22 [url]

Apr 4 17 10:24 PM

man, i remember when i used to use roundwounds and they would get dull.... i would boil them to get the life back after they lost some "snap." it actually works fairly well (especially when you had no money to buy a new set). did piss off the girl who's pot/kitchen i used to use though.

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tb av

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,155 Member Since:24/04/2011

#23 [url]

Apr 4 17 10:41 PM

Ok thanks... I guess I'll try a set of those tapewounds and a set of the Dean Markley and see which ones I like. Do bass players get paid a higher scale so they can afford strings?

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,540 Member Since:24/03/2013

#24 [url]

Apr 4 17 11:08 PM

tb av wrote:
Ok thanks... I guess I'll try a set of those tapewounds and a set of the Dean Markley and see which ones I like. Do bass players get paid a higher scale so they can afford strings?

No, but they (or "we," I guess - I'm 50/50 guitar & bass) usually spend less money on pedals and other assorted B.S. so it evens out. 

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,399 Member Since:04/02/2011

#25 [url]

Apr 5 17 12:06 AM

jesse decarlo wrote:

tb av wrote:
Ok thanks... I guess I'll try a set of those tapewounds and a set of the Dean Markley and see which ones I like. Do bass players get paid a higher scale so they can afford strings?

No, but they (or "we," I guess - I'm 50/50 guitar & bass) usually spend less money on pedals and other assorted B.S. so it evens out. 

not to mention that they get more gigs! ha.

Pyramids are expensive, but if you're using flatwounds this is negligible (at least, if you treat flatwounds how I do... which is to never change them unless they break).

brad allen williams

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,953 Member Since:20/01/2011

#26 [url]

Apr 5 17 3:30 AM

If you want traditional flats, the pyramids are aces. 

I just have come to prefer the nylon tapewounds. 

The boiling thing revitalises them partially for another show or two, but that's about it. 

To really sound right, roundwounds need to be new. 
On the road now in Australia I'm changing  every three shows. 

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seth.lucasmicrophone

Tin Man

Posts: 28 Member Since:03/10/2013

#27 [url]

Apr 5 17 7:39 AM

Every three shows sounds right. I've never found anything that really brings back the rich harmonic content of new strings. I tried boiling them, wiping with alcohol, nothing really brings them back. I find they're brighter than they were but the timbre is harder and edgier. Interestingly, the Dean Markley Blue Steel bass strings when new sound to me like the Super Rounds after they've been boiled. I also find that the Super Rounds last a long time and still sound good even when they're too dead for bright sessions.

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injured ear

Silverado

Posts: 79 Member Since:20/02/2012

#28 [url]

Apr 5 17 9:25 AM

I have a set of Thomastik flats that sound excellent.
It's only my second foray into flatwounds, but I love them.
Expensive as hell.
Intrigued by the tapewounds. I have heard that they can be problematic fitting into the cutouts at the nut. Has this been your experience, William?

When I play roundwounds, I've always been partial to GHS boomers (45-105) because they seem to have a longer half-life before going dead.
When I mean half-life: Brand new strings have a specific zingy sound that can disappear within a few hours. The tone that persists after that which is still bright, but not brand new bright, but before sounding dead is very useful to me. On GHS boomers, that tone lasts longer than Rotosounds which seem to go dead way too quickly for me.

Other functions I would recommend for a build:
The standard wiring for a Jazz is 2 volumes and a tone knob. Is that Jaco wiring?
I prefer 1 volume, 1 blend (pickup select), 1 tone knob. No idea if that wrecks the tone but I like the constant volume as I change pickup selection.

Greg Thompson

www.injured-ear.com

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,540 Member Since:24/03/2013

#29 [url]

Apr 5 17 9:32 AM

I put a set of DR flatwounds on my P-bass a few months ago and they've been really great. Really thumpy, with a beautiful "round" attack. Whatever that all means.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,399 Member Since:04/02/2011

#30 [url]

Apr 5 17 9:34 AM

with guitar, I actually prefer roundwounds when they're a little bit older. To me there's a sweet spot a week or so after changing that lasts until they are 'dead.' Which varies depending on the player, but for me can last a long time... months even.

some players' body chemistry is such that they can borrow one of my guitars and the strings are totally dead after a very short time of playing.

brad allen williams

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tb av

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,155 Member Since:24/04/2011

#31 [url]

Apr 5 17 11:57 AM

soapfoot wrote:
with guitar, I actually prefer roundwounds when they're a little bit older. To me there's a sweet spot a week or so after changing that lasts until they are 'dead.' Which varies depending on the player, but for me can last a long time... months even.


 

That's pretty much what I like too with guitar. I also hate changing strings unless it's with Sperzel tuners. Also with the price of bass strings and my skill level, I simply need to learn to live with what comes out on the long term. I'm just not good enough to be dealing with perfect new string sound. Dead ones have to go, but long term 'good' sound is really what I need.

======
Here is the wireing I will probably go with. Can't seem to find that "Jaco" diagram right now. Not sure if it was different or not.
image


UNLESS --- anyone here has any thoughts on this SERIES / PARALLEL switch.. which would be easy to do as well. I suppose it can't hurt to put it in.

image


RE: a BLEND pot....   I played a guitar with a BLEND pot the other day and honestly it's not something I really liked. It's enough of a chore for me to play a guitar or play a bass, so I like to keep things pretty simple. 1 VOL per PU and a TONE, is something I can keep track of by ear or feel.



 

Tom B

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,540 Member Since:24/03/2013

#32 [url]

Apr 5 17 12:26 PM

I like a blend pot on Jazz-style basses, for the reason somebody mentioned earlier: a big part of the J sound is having both pickups at equal output, and without the blend knob it's pretty hard to adjust volume on the fly while maintaining that.

And yeah, as Seth pointed out, you CAN leave both volume controls all the way up and manage the level with your right hand technique, but most of us aren't as good as Seth is.

A switch in place of a blend knob also can accomplish this, but at the expense of flexibility. If I want the bridge pickup sound on a J bass, but with a little more ass than you'd get from that pickup by itself, I move the blend knob just past the center detent so I'm getting mostly bridge but with some neck mixed in.  Can't say I've ever tried a guitar with a blend knob though!

Many years ago a friend of mine saw Paul Jackson Sr. playing at a nightclub, using a P-bass with NO KNOBS. One pickup to the output jack, period. My friend (an accomplished pro bass player himself) said, probably at least half-joking, "Hey Paul, how do you control your volume?" Paul just looked at him and stuck out his right index finger.

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tb av

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,155 Member Since:24/04/2011

#33 [url]

Apr 6 17 10:58 AM

Well I won;t rule it out... But if in general you want both PUs going pretty much full it seems like the BLEND would spend a lot of time in the central position.

"I like a blend pot on Jazz-style basses, for the reason somebody mentioned earlier: a big part of the J sound is having both pickups at equal output, and without the blend knob it's pretty hard to adjust volume on the fly while maintaining that."

Not sure I'm following that. that sounds like a Master Vol more than a Blend? Won't you still have to set your two individual Vols? ... and if it is a Master Vol I think I would be better off with a Vol pedal.

The Blend Pot I'm talking about simply acts as a variable pickup selector. Instead of Neck/Both/Bridge... you vary in between them... That's regardless of where the individual Vols are placed. So if say the Neck Vol was at 4... you could Blend towards it but the Neck will probably still be in charge so to speak. Without blend just roll the Neck back to 4 and Bridge full on.

Maybe a Jazz Blend Pot does not work this way? I'm not at all familiar with that wiring. So maybe it works differently than what I am imagining. But it sounds to me like you are describing a MasterVol. I get the part where you rolled it towards the Neck a bit for some more bite... but you still have to use your 2 Vol knobs for overall Vol... unless of course they are indeed Full On.... I think I see what you mean now the more I think about it. When the PUs are Full On the Blend works like a Vol Balance.

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,540 Member Since:24/03/2013

#34 [url]

Apr 6 17 11:14 AM

If you wire the bass with a blend knob then there is only one volume knob.

So, if the blend is centered, you can adjust that one volume knob and always have equal output from both pickups at any volume.

Or, if you find another position on the blend knob you like, you can adjust the volume knob while still maintaining that balance.

With the usual alternative (2 volume pots and no blend), if you are using some combination of the 2 pickups it is very difficult to adjust the volume without also changing the balance.

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seth.lucasmicrophone

Tin Man

Posts: 28 Member Since:03/10/2013

#35 [url]

Apr 6 17 11:39 AM

A blend pot on a jazz replaces one volume pot, and is a pan pot between the pickups. Does that make more sense? You have a center detent and as you turn it each way you get more of one pickup and less of the other, but the level doesn't change. The volume is in effect a master volume and the tone is a master tone.

Thanks for your kind words Jesse. I should have added that you also have a lot of control over tone with your right hand - where you pick, closer to the bridge, the neck, or the middle. Whether you pick with your fingers, a pick, one finger, two fingers, pluck with your thumb or slap with your thumb or figertips. I also think many people don't realize that how strong your left hand is has a lot to do with tone as well - if you you're really strong and have good left-hand technique your tone and your pitch is clearer and more consistent. Since it's actually the fret and not your finger that stops the string on a fretted bass how hard you press down on the string behind the fret can vary the pitch subtly but audibly. Try it. Consistency is the most important thing for good pitch, but having a really strong left hand gives clearer tone.

When I was learning to play there were very few alternatives to Fenders, and they were all passive. So you really had to deal with this stuff. Once you get used to having that degree of control under your hands you don't, or rather I don't, like to give it up to devices. I hate being over-compressed. I know how to keep my level consistent and if it's not consistent it's because that's the musical requirement the way I perceive it. I was doing a live TV recording and the engineer from a huge, well-known audio truck came in and gave me a very patronizing lecture about keeping my dynamics even. I explained to him that I was playing with an ensemble in a hall, that my dynamics had to be tailored to fit the ensemble, and he would have to capture the dynamics as best he could. I never heard the tracks.

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,540 Member Since:24/03/2013

#36 [url]

Apr 6 17 11:44 AM

The point about using right hand (and left hand) technique to control tone is worth emphasizing. I work with a bass player who can make his stock 1975 P-bass sound like 6 different instruments without touching any knobs.

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,678 Member Since:14/02/2011

#37 [url]

Apr 6 17 11:58 AM

So the young fellow decided to go new and purchased a Fender Elite Precision.

He's very happy with it he says. It has one jazz PU in the back and the standard Precision PU in the mid/front position.
It looks nice, in the pics he sent.

Thanks for all the info folks, he says he may look at upgrading the jazz at a later date.

OK it's cold here

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,399 Member Since:04/02/2011

#38 [url]

Apr 6 17 11:58 AM

seth wrote:
A blend pot on a jazz replaces one volume pot, and is a pan pot between the pickups. Does that make more sense? You have a center detent and as you turn it each way you get more of one pickup and less of the other, but the level doesn't change. The volume is in effect a master volume and the tone is a master tone.

Thanks for your kind words Jesse. I should have added that you also have a lot of control over tone with your right hand - where you pick, closer to the bridge, the neck, or the middle. Whether you pick with your fingers, a pick, one finger, two fingers, pluck with your thumb or slap with your thumb or figertips. I also think many people don't realize that how strong your left hand is has a lot to do with tone as well - if you you're really strong and have good left-hand technique your tone and your pitch is clearer and more consistent. Since it's actually the fret and not your finger that stops the string on a fretted bass how hard you press down on the string behind the fret can vary the pitch subtly but audibly. Try it. Consistency is the most important thing for good pitch, but having a really strong left hand gives clearer tone.

When I was learning to play there were very few alternatives to Fenders, and they were all passive. So you really had to deal with this stuff. Once you get used to having that degree of control under your hands you don't, or rather I don't, like to give it up to devices. I hate being over-compressed. I know how to keep my level consistent and if it's not consistent it's because that's the musical requirement the way I perceive it. I was doing a live TV recording and the engineer from a huge, well-known audio truck came in and gave me a very patronizing lecture about keeping my dynamics even. I explained to him that I was playing with an ensemble in a hall, that my dynamics had to be tailored to fit the ensemble, and he would have to capture the dynamics as best he could. I never heard the tracks.

UGH.

Once I heard a FOH guy give a patronizing, condescending note to an award-winning, world-class drummer that "the volume of your hits is really uneven."

It was all I could do not to get on my vocal mic and say "yeah, no shit, dumbass. It's called 'dynamics.'" 

But I'm a "professional," so I did not do that, no matter how much I may have wanted to!

brad allen williams

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jesse decarlo

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,540 Member Since:24/03/2013

#40 [url]

Apr 6 17 1:34 PM

morespaceecho wrote:
you have more restraint than i would've!

possible thread drift: is it really unprofessional to put condesceding dumbasses in their place?

I guess it kinda depends on who you're working for, and who the dumbass is working for. 

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