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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,991 Member Since:20/01/2011

#42 [url]

Apr 20 17 2:58 PM

I've been preparing to clean up my Telecaster and was about to hit Rite Aid for more lighter fluid, when I decided to Google "Naphtha" and discovered some rather confusing information..

Apparently Ronsonol does not use Naphtha, which at face value was shocking, but more confusing, really...

According to Wikipedia Naphtha is a generic name and there are several types of things are called Naphtha, from Kerosene to Denatured Alcohol..

Further Googling indicated it's use in the production of hallucinogenic  drugs..!

This is available locally, I wonder if Brad or anyone has any experience with it?

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Klean-Strip-Quart-VM-P-Naphtha/3162199


030192046159.jpg

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,650 Member Since:14/02/2011

#43 [url]

Apr 20 17 3:13 PM

If you are worried, try the Murphy oil soap. It worked great for me. Not only did it take off dirt but it took some of the caked on nicotine off as well.

OK it's cold here

Last Edited By: spiritwalker Apr 20 17 3:19 PM. Edited 1 time.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,224 Member Since:04/02/2011

#45 [url]

Apr 20 17 3:32 PM

FWIW, I wouldn't get into the habit of using oil soap; it can form a residue over time, and can cause complications if any future finish repair or touchup is needed.

brad allen williams

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,991 Member Since:20/01/2011

#46 [url]

Apr 20 17 4:38 PM

spiritwalker wrote:
If you are worried, try the Murphy oil soap. It worked great for me. Not only did it take off dirt but it took some of the caked on nicotine off as well.

I wouldn't use Murphy's for my purposes, initially on my 1979 Strat it was to remove the wax from the finish.

My current plan is to use Naphtha to clean and de-gunk the "F" tuners  and also to clean the neck and fingerboard.

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,650 Member Since:14/02/2011

#49 [url]

Apr 20 17 11:34 PM

Humm...Ok I'll take your guys word on the Murphy Oil. It worked great in this case though.

Here's a couple pics of the 76. You can see the black pickguard in the one pic and then it sitting with my Custom Shop 69.

I'm assuming that the body is ash, but it's really light, way lighter than the silver beast.

image

image

OK it's cold here

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,224 Member Since:04/02/2011

#50 [url]

Apr 21 17 2:21 AM

definitely an ash body! Cool that it's light.

Most of the 70s Fenders that were ash were heavier Northern Ash. In the 50s and 60s they used Southern Swamp Ash, which is much lighter. To tell the truth, they always probably just used whatever was cheapest.

The heavier wood started to creep in around '66, and in '67 Fender even experimented with hogging out big cavities under the pickguards of Telecasters. They stopped doing that by '68, so it's pretty rare... vintage dealers call them "smugglers' telecasters" because you could keep illicit substances in the extra cavities if you wanted. After they stopped doing the smuggler routs, they experimented with offering hollow telecasters and that became the Tele Thinline.

brad allen williams

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,991 Member Since:20/01/2011

#51 [url]

Apr 21 17 7:32 AM

Wow, that is a very nice looking Strat..! It reminds me of something, I can't quite place what..

It is hard to tell in the photo, but it looks like it was possibly stripped or refinished at some point, did it look like this when you originally owned it?


So many forces conspired in the 1970s to make Fender guitars "heavy"... I've heard that in 1975 CBS issued an ECO to stop "doubly kilning" the wood, so a lot of heavy "green" wood was going into guitars. I've also heard that they were buying Ash from wherever they could find it.


I recently watched a Fender Custom Shop video series on their "tone woods", were they said they would use Alder for a heavier instrument in general.. (the Sean Spicer meets Louis C.K. guy also kinda disputes the northern/swamp ash distinction!)


Also in the 1970s guitarists were being told that "mass= SUSTAIN" and SUSTAIN was the holy grail of guitar "tone" in the 1970s.. Gibson was producing some real boat anchors and the kids were putting brass nuts and brass saddles on their "embarrassingly light" guitars..




 

Last Edited By: zmix Apr 21 17 7:35 AM. Edited 2 times.

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,535 Member Since:26/01/2011

#52 [url]

Apr 21 17 9:34 AM

Does anybody know when Fender switched to Alder? I've always assumed my Jazz basses were Alder but very light. This guy says Alder is very consistent, so now I'm wondering.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,224 Member Since:04/02/2011

#53 [url]

Apr 21 17 9:40 AM

seth wrote:
Does anybody know when Fender switched to Alder? I've always assumed my Jazz basses were Alder but very light. This guy says Alder is very consistent, so now I'm wondering.

Alder is kind of a middle-weight, and can be somewhat light. Ash is much more bipolar and can be extremely heavy or extremely light.

Fender never "switched" to Alder completely... they always used ash on blonde telecasters, for instance. On Strats, they switched from ash to alder (except the blonde and mary kay models!) in a wide transitional period around 1956-1957

But your jazz basses should be alder. All the ones I've seen from the 1960s are.

brad allen williams

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,650 Member Since:14/02/2011

#54 [url]

Apr 21 17 10:08 AM

zmix wrote:
Wow, that is a very nice looking Strat..! It reminds me of something, I can't quite place what..



It is hard to tell in the photo, but it looks like it was possibly stripped or refinished at some point, did it look like this when you originally owned it?









 

It always has looked similar. Definately nicotine stained, but not refinished. Under the pickguard you can see the original clear colour. I'll take some more pics when I pull it apart to do the changes that I'm looking at for the white pickguard and bridge. I'll also pull the neck and take some pics of that so we have a reference to the others we have seen on here.
The neck is really nice, one ding right around the top middle on the backside, but I don't feel it as I'm playing. It needs a new nut and some fret work.
This guitar has been abused in the time that the other owner has had it. Some nice "relicing" on the body and of course the black pickguard componets have taken some hits.

But..It's a lovely feeling instrument, sound wise I still don't know as it has issues that I have to resolve.

I am really surprised at how different each Stratocaster or Tele that I have run into feels. The two Strats I have are night and day, both full of tunes but one feels like a blues machine and the other heads right to AC/DC

Fascinating.

OK it's cold here

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zakco

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,071 Member Since:02/03/2011

#55 [url]

soapfoot wrote

Alder is kind of a middle-weight, and can be somewhat light. Ash is much more bipolar and can be extremely heavy or extremely light.
I own a 74 telecaster with an Alder body that is definitely on the lighter end of the spectrum. Maple neck, 4 bolt...it's a pretty great instrument. I've played better teles over the years, but I'd still give this one a solid 8.5-9 out of 10

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,031 Member Since:23/01/2011

#56 [url]

soapfoot wrote:
Alder is kind of a middle-weight, and can be somewhat light.

In the late 70's-early 80's, I used to be sort of a medium-duty guitar repairman in a small music store.  Every once in a while someone would bring in a '61 or '62 Strat which, I believe, had alder bodies.  They were light and had a uniquely 'sproingy' sound quality that made me decide that, if I ever came into a financial windfall, those were the 2 years I'd be looking at... particularly '61.  

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,224 Member Since:04/02/2011

#57 [url]

'62 necks are my favorite Fender rosewood necks. Actually, the late '62 veneer boards, which are less desirable than the earlier slab boards, but I just happen to really like the shape

brad allen williams

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