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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,512 Member Since:04/02/2011

#2 [url]

Jul 16 17 7:53 AM

Very interesting!

I'd love to know more about their presses, and the quality of their work. Anyone with firsthand experience?

brad allen williams

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,512 Member Since:04/02/2011

#6 [url]

Jul 16 17 6:15 PM

chance wrote:
That was a good read. I wonder if anything has changed in the process from the lathe to the mother mold has changed

Not likely. The Neumann VMS-80 lathe and SX-74 cutterhead are still state-of-the-art, as far as I know (DMM cutters will still use the VMS-82, and some VMS-82 have been retrofitted to cut lacquer instead of copper). The "80" and "74" refer to 1980 and 1974, respectively. The bottleneck in vinyl isn't the mastering (at least not yet), so we're unlikely to see someone tooling up to make disc cutting lathes in the foreseeable future.

As for the galvanics... I know less about that end. 





 

brad allen williams

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,512 Member Since:04/02/2011

#8 [url]

Jul 17 17 5:18 AM

Their site seems to imply that their head is mostly an SX-74 copy? Cool nonetheless that someone is making new cutterheads.

brad allen williams

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dcollins

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,373 Member Since:27/01/2011

#9 [url]

Jul 17 17 12:38 PM

Something with rare-earth magnets seems like a good idea. Not much else has changed in materials science that comes to mind.

 davecollinsmastering.com


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waltzingbear

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Posts: 1,268 Member Since:16/07/2012

#10 [url]

Jul 17 17 12:51 PM

I agree with Dave about what potentials there is for changes to cutter head design. ie not a lot.

there could be some room for minor improvements by using better computer aided modeling and things that have been learned in driver technology. But that would be a long and costly design process, not likely given the low numbers of potential users.

Cheers
Alan

Alan Garren
Waltzing Bear Audio

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chance

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,750 Member Since:30/01/2011

#11 [url]

Jul 17 17 4:41 PM

Laser cutting head? If they already have a laser to read the vinyl tracks, I would think a laser could also cut the grooves, but then we are back to CD

Last Edited By: chance Jul 17 17 4:48 PM. Edited 1 time.

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dcollins

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,373 Member Since:27/01/2011

#12 [url]

Jul 17 17 4:41 PM

Maybe getting rid of that Evil Negative Feedback that has poisoned every LP ever cut! If people recoil from it in their amps, how can they allow in The Coil?

 davecollinsmastering.com


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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,532 Member Since:27/01/2011

#14 [url]

Jul 17 17 5:20 PM

bob olhsson wrote:
A German company began manufacturing them recently. I think Third Man bought some of them.

There are a few new presses being manufactured. I believe GZ owns the plant in the article. GZ had presses designed and built for them. I don't think they are commercially available.

Third Man bought Finebuilt presses which are hand presses  made in Germany.

Then there is Viryl which is the Toronto based company that Dietrich is involved with. Josey Records in Dallas have them and I believe there have been a bunch more sold but not announced.

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,288 Member Since:20/01/2011

#15 [url]

Jul 17 17 5:22 PM

dcollins wrote:
Maybe getting rid of that Evil Negative Feedback that has poisoned every LP ever cut! If people recoil from it in their amps, how can they allow in The Coil?

Let's be sure not to talk about the digital delay used (as far back as 1973..!)  in line with the cutterhead in some setups without preview heads on the tape machine.

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,532 Member Since:27/01/2011

#16 [url]

Jul 17 17 5:35 PM

dcollins wrote:
Maybe getting rid of that Evil Negative Feedback that has poisoned every LP ever cut! If people recoil from it in their amps, how can they allow in The Coil?

I've always thought a snare drum only recording format would be a winner. With a 40dB resonant peak a 1k Hz I think we have it. It would probably sound even better throught the 14 bit Studer DDL everyone used.

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dietrich

Silverado

Posts: 144 Member Since:01/02/2011

#17 [url]

Jul 18 17 8:35 AM

Lots of marketing and not full info on these announcements. Seems every new plant says they are the only one using NEW machines

This plant is using Czech made manual presses that the GZ plant has been using for years now.

Up the road we are also making new automatic presses and another Toronto area plant Microforum is using our Warmtones.
Also-http://mailchi.mp/riotactmedia/kindercore-brings-innovation-sustainability-to-vinyl-record-pressing-in-athens-ga?e=[UNIQID]

Others like stated above are using the German manual clones too

There are more new plants coming online this summer



 

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mdm

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,745 Member Since:27/01/2011

#18 [url]

If you bring back vinyl, better do it in a way that is a pure expression of the technology.

It's a fact that many people were using digital delay lines instead of tape heads but generally speaking, a lot of crappy-sounding LP's were produced, such as Greatest Hits records being so full of music that the sound was feeble, noisy and lacking bass etc.

I think there could be improvements in Lathe cutting... one thing that comes to mind is Class D power amps for the lathe if possible or maybe reducing some of that negative feedback, using slower cutting speeds etc.. This kind of approach gives room for improvement, which gives added value. You need to sell something with extra value IMO in order to compete with free downloads and low-res files.

Last Edited By: mdm . Edited 1 time.

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,532 Member Since:27/01/2011

#19 [url]

mdm wrote:

I think there could be improvements in Lathe cutting... one thing that comes to mind is Class D power amps for the lathe if possible or maybe reducing some of that negative feedback, using slower cutting speeds etc.. This kind of approach gives room for improvement, which gives added value. You need to sell something with extra value IMO in order to compete with free downloads and low-res files.
 

Class D amps an improvement? Why?

Reducing negative feedback where? It's everywhere in the all the versions of Neumann electronics. Reducing feedback in the cutterhead? Doesn't even deserve an answer iit's so idiotic.

Slower cutting speeds sounds cool. Try mastering an album at half speed.  You have to make a cutting master instead of mastering directly off the mixes. Not a an improvement.

Even if you could "improve" the cutting, the bottleneck is playback. Improve that first. Good luck. Vinyl is competeing pretty well with free. Free doesn't have much value.

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gr

Gold Finger

Posts: 359 Member Since:21/02/2011

#20 [url]

Bruno Putzeys on Class D amps for cutting:

"I get this question mailed directly to me by cutting engineers with surprising regularity. I'll leave aside the usual diatribe about the verifiable nonexistence of something like a digital amplifier (it's at http://www.hypex.nl/docs/allamps%20hypex%20layout.pdf if anyone's interested).

The important question is: what are the advantages to using class D?
*It's efficient
*It's compact

Those are the *only* defining characteristics which cannot be emulated or obtained more easily using non-switching power stages. In all other aspects, class D is a decided burden. Characteristics which are possible, but very difficult to achieve in class D are:
*Low distortion, low output impedance, uncoloured sound etc. Some makes of class D amps have a reputation for good sonic and measured quality. This is not because of class D but in spite of it. It's really hard.
*Absense of a switching residual. A small amount of residual is of no consequence in a loudspeaker, but would you like to cut a 400kHz signal, even a very tiny one, into a groove? I think not.

Characteristics of linear power amps that are impossible to get with switching power stages are:
*Simplicity of design
*Very wide bandwidth
And in the context of cutting
*Very high output impedance
*Ease with which a supplementary feedback loop is added

To make a long story short. Efficient is nice when a million people have their stereos on. Compact is nice when the product goes into your living room. Neither are particularly important when you're cutting records. Each record is cut exactly once, so the heat output is lost only once. And 4u of rack space next to the lathe isn't going to spoil an already geeky interior.

What you do need is:
*A feedback loop from the sense coils, preferably one that doesn't take a seasoned control theoretician two years to work out. A wideband amplifier makes this almost simple.
*Current out (one could work around that).

A class D amp to drive a cutting head solves nothing and only adds more problems."

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