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ccash

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,467 Member Since: 19/01/2011

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May 3 14 7:04 PM

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I have a lovely old Kalamazoo amp, from the late 40's I think.
Sounds wonderful, about 6 watts  with a 10" speaker.
I was playing it today and all was well.
When I unplugged it to put it away I noticed light coming through the speaker!
Closer inspection revealed two small holes right next to each other about 1/2 " from the foam surround thingy.
The holes are about the size of my pinky finger nail.

The amp still sounds incredible.
Should I leave it alone, try fix it or perhaps a re-cone?
Or maybe just look for another speaker?
I am really really happy with how it sounds as is.

Help.
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.

Posts: 1,503 Member Since:28/11/2011

#1 [url]

May 3 14 9:30 PM

Is the material still there? 

I have had great success in the past by using extremely thin coating of clear silicone caulk to 'glue' the rip back together. 

With a finger on one side for support, spread the smallest amount on the other side along the tear with index finger of the other hand. Allow to dry, and repeat on the opposite side. If this doesn't do it, repeat until you've "built up" the rip with the silicone. Smallest amount possible. 

Of course this won't work if the paper is actually missing from the hole/tear, but it works quite well if done carefully.

 "Real People, Real Performances."

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ccash

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,467 Member Since:19/01/2011

#4 [url]

May 4 14 6:09 AM

The material is missing.

But it still sounds awesome.
I think I should leave it alone till it stops sounding awesome.

Last Edited By: ccash May 4 14 6:59 AM. Edited 1 time.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,231 Member Since:04/02/2011

#5 [url]

May 4 14 8:15 AM

A layer of black tissue paper on either side, coated with a 1:1 mixture of white glue and water. Easy peasy.

brad allen williams

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,231 Member Since:04/02/2011

#7 [url]

May 4 14 8:39 AM

yes, exactly!

You'd be shocked how well this repair works. The 'black' color for the tissue paper (the gift-box kind!) is optional, obviously. You could use any color and dust the repair with flat black paint if you want it to be invisible, or you could use any color and not attempt to disguise the repair.

brad allen williams

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dave harrison

Gold Finger

Posts: 821 Member Since:21/01/2011

#9 [url]

May 4 14 9:56 AM

If this is in an open back cabinet, the holes won't matter. Simply reinforce the edges of the holes to prevent tearing, Any glue that dries flexible (rubber cement, kids white glue) will work fine. Try to avoid build up next to the surround, this is where most of the stress on the cone is... keep the repair thin and pliable.

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scullyfan

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,570 Member Since:27/07/2011

#11 [url]

May 4 14 1:00 PM

+1 on the Elmer's Glue. I repaired an old University speaker cone with it over 30 years ago and it still is holding together. I don't think I'd use a glue or cement that would flex in a situation like speaker cone repair, but that's just me.

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panman

Gold Finger

Posts: 529 Member Since:04/02/2011

#12 [url]

May 4 14 3:48 PM

soapfoot wrote:
A layer of black tissue paper on either side, coated with a 1:1 mixture of white glue and water. Easy peasy.

This!!!

Esa Tervala

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.

Posts: 1,503 Member Since:28/11/2011

#16 [url]

May 4 14 9:18 PM

Next time I need to do this, I will try the tissue/Elmer's thing. 

Learn something new here all the time.. 

 "Real People, Real Performances."

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mikerivers

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,487 Member Since:13/10/2012

#17 [url]

May 5 14 6:04 AM

 

compasspnt wrote:
Go to Lowe's, they have it!

If you're talking about white glue, sure, but if you're talking about Barge, they may have it by name, but the formula was changed a couple of years ago. Like New Coke and Cramolin, it's not the same and it doesn't work as well for the things it was originally made for, like gluing the soles on to shoes. It may work fine for speaker cones, though, if that's how you want to do the job. 



For a good time, call mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com

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crazydoc

Silverado

Posts: 99 Member Since:13/02/2011

#18 [url]

Jun 11 14 12:57 AM

I use Elmer's and coffee filter paper - there's always one from the morning in the trash, and since the fibers don't fall apart in water I just rinse it out.

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barkleymckay

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,338 Member Since:22/01/2011

#19 [url]

Jun 11 14 11:02 AM

I repaired my pair of 60's Goodmans 12" speakers last year.
They are in a Selmer Cab loaded with a 18 watt Traynor Guitar Mate Reverb from 1970. A great combo.
I used the white paper glue/PVA stuff, coffee filter paper, and a chopstick to help roll the paper into the shape of the cone and squeeze out the excess glue.
A little black paint for cosmetics and it's been fine for the last year. No buzzes, and no noticeable change in tone or response.
I did patch both sides of the repair for extra security - but this may have been overkill.
I got these rips from the bad habit of chucking everything into the back of the cabinet!
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