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chrisj

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,007 Member Since:22/02/2011

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Nov 24 14 3:14 PM

I'm delighted that he liked my stuff that much. And that speaks volumes for Tape Op, as _I_ certainly can't pay 'em off for good press! I might be able to fix my car up a bit, though! :D

The part that left my jaw hanging was that he liked Console BETTER than analog summing. I suspect maybe if he had better monitoring he'd feel different, but at least the conversion was good. Also, I know at least one guy who's using Console _with_ external summing. Maybe Kirt would like that even better. Anyhow, a very good day and long a-coming :)

Chris Johnson, airwindows.com

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soapfoot

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Posts: 7,504 Member Since:04/02/2011

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Nov 25 14 8:27 AM

chrisj wrote:
And that speaks volumes for Tape Op, as _I_ certainly can't pay 'em off for good press! 
I've written a couple of gear reviews for Tape Op (including one in the current issue). I will say definitively that payola-for-review doesn't happen-- which is the best thing going for that magazine. The writing isn't always the best, and the reviews aren't always the most informative (sometimes there is bad or incomplete information, or leaps of logic). Writers don't get paid all that much for gear reviews.

But basically, the writers get to review what they like, and it's not that hard to be able to write reviews for them (one of the reasons I did is that I felt it was a better action than merely complaining about the standard not being higher-- get involved, raise the bar).

After a review is written, someone on the magazine's staff will usually reach out to the maker or manufacturer and see if they want to purchase advertising in the issue with the review. If they decide to do so, they'll make every effort to place the ad on the same page as the review, or on the facing page. But I've never heard of them pulling a review because someone declined to buy ad space, or choosing which reviews get published based on any economic kickback.

I don't read much in the way of recording magazines these days, but the subscription is free so it keeps coming. Not everyone is interested in the DIY/indie/low budget slant (truth be told, I'm not really, anymore) but the way it's run at least seems to have integrity, which is a positive.

brad allen williams

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fenris

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Posts: 1,450 Member Since:26/01/2011

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Nov 25 14 10:37 PM

People talk about "summing" when they really mean harmonic distortion and subtle dynamic compression caused by sag in the power supply. Best experienced with old discrete gear. I have a clean-ish console, and I routinely record direct channel outs into the DAW and rebalance them in the computer, and I can't hear any difference. I'm amazed that anyone would spend $$$ on those D******s mixers that cost more than my entire console. You might as well get a Funk Logic Palindrometer, it has exactly the same functionality and it's a lot cheaper.

It looks like Chris has made some interesting discoveries about the weird things that go on inside an analog console. A lot of manufacturers had f'd up summing in their earlier consoles and it took them 10 or 15 years to work out the problems.

Last Edited By: fenris Nov 25 14 10:47 PM. Edited 1 time.

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chrisj

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Posts: 1,007 Member Since:22/02/2011

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Nov 26 14 8:58 AM

soapfoot wrote:

chrisj wrote:And that speaks volumes for Tape Op, as _I_ certainly can't pay 'em off for good press! 

I've written a couple of gear reviews for Tape Op (including one in the current issue). I will say definitively that payola-for-review doesn't happen-- which is the best thing going for that magazine. The writing isn't always the best, and the reviews aren't always the most informative (sometimes there is bad or incomplete information, or leaps of logic). Writers don't get paid all that much for gear reviews.

I don't read much in the way of recording magazines these days, but the subscription is free so it keeps coming. Not everyone is interested in the DIY/indie/low budget slant (truth be told, I'm not really, anymore) but the way it's run at least seems to have integrity, which is a positive.


Yeah, I feel I can vouch for that now. Actually, years ago I made some odd little very DIY stompboxes. I don't even remember how long ago that was, but those got a look by Tape Op, I think.

Certainly what I did there represents f'ed up summing, which also means it's only ONE type of sound. I'm still interested in exploring others, like how to make stuff sum like it does over large volumes of air (not at all the same as digital summing). But what Console does isn't that weird. I felt that saturating sounds tends to bring them forward (especially very even transfer functions without sharp breaks). Doing the opposite gives a weird unmusical spiky sound that also happens to sound more far-away (pretty much the un-marketable as a 'mix sound'). But if you saturate everything on channels and then apply the complementary function on the buss, individual channels should come out more or less unaltered. Things in phase likewise don't change much. But as things interact out-of-phase, they hit the buss at much lower levels, but the saturation applied on the channel is still there. So as things go out of phase, distortion levels rise rapidly and the output falls off.

That's all I'm doing (at least with the first Console, I've made it a bit more sophisticated by now).

As near as I can work out, this is the same as if you had a poorly designed console where the channels only had so much headroom, their summing networks weren't perfect, and the buss input impedance fluctuated depending on the audio so that out of phase stuff tended to stress the channels without producing much effect on the buss output. They'd distort more easily through pumping voltage into each other through leaks in the summing resistance network, which might be overly interactive because it'd not lose so much gain and then have to make it up. But really, I'm not going to claim some amazing insight into mixer networks. I've built them and I'm no great shakes at it. It's just an experiment :)

Chris Johnson, airwindows.com

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