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ccash

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,470 Member Since: 19/01/2011

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Jan 13 15 9:46 AM

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I am about to start a recording session with a really talented local musician.
He is a song writer and an incredible guitar player.
He is 70 years old and has been playing forever, in and out of bands and has also recorded an album with a big blues name back in the 70's that we all know.
He does not want to work with any of his former band members.
A couple weeks ago I set him up with a drummer and bass player that I sometimes work with and they were all happy, so he wants to go ahead and get started.
Keeping in mind that these players dont know any of his songs and have never played with him I have no fear that they will be able to come in and nail them.
I told him to choose 10 or 12 songs, he says he has 16 ready to go.
He says that some of the songs will also be needing sax, flute,B3 and maybe some others. I have all that coverd.
He wants to record live, no headphones, no click trac  :-)  .

I have a day job and cannot work late at night on weeknights.
So weekends are really the only time that we can work.
The artist knows this and is fine with it as we have been recording stuff together for years.
The other musicians are also fine with this.

My thoughts.

I can either have them come in on weekends and learn and rehearse the songs , then when we feel its tight record them al at one tim.

or,

Every weekend learn a song or two and record it and move on.
I am more inclined to the second thought.

I am also thinking that any overdubs, additional guitars, sax, flute ,B3, whatever should be done after we have the basics done.

Any tips, thoughs or advice would be most appreciated.
I really want to come away with something nice.

Thanks.
 
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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,682 Member Since:14/02/2011

#1 [url]

Jan 13 15 11:24 AM

I assume that the client is producing and you are just recording? If yes, can the players get together before they come to the studio on the weekend?

That's what I would suggest. That way they can nail the beds without a lot of fuss learning the tunes. Then they can listen to the beds and decide if they need to re-work and re-record.

Just a thought.

OK it's cold here

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jburtner

Gold Finger

Posts: 449 Member Since:26/01/2011

#3 [url]

Jan 13 15 12:07 PM

I would recommend them learning the tune and tracking same day in the studio live to multi with the goal of every input being the keeper. I would personally much prefer capturing the immediacy of the moment such that their take is approaching the cusp of discovery. Recording as much as possible live, with any overdubs in the moment while that feeling is most present.

My $0.02!
Cheers,
jb

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ccash

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,470 Member Since:19/01/2011

#4 [url]

Jan 13 15 12:20 PM

jburtner wrote:
I would recommend them learning the tune and tracking same day in the studio live to multi with the goal of every input being the keeper. I would personally much prefer capturing the immediacy of the moment such that their take is approaching the cusp of discovery. Recording as much as possible live, with any overdubs in the moment while that feeling is most present.

My $0.02!
Cheers,
jb

Awesome!

Thanks so much.

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.

Posts: 1,503 Member Since:28/11/2011

#5 [url]

Jan 13 15 12:45 PM

jburtner wrote:
I would recommend them learning the tune and tracking same day in the studio live to multi with the goal of every input being the keeper. I would personally much prefer capturing the immediacy of the moment such that their take is approaching the cusp of discovery. Recording as much as possible live, with any overdubs in the moment while that feeling is most present.

My $0.02!
Cheers,
jb

I'm with you, J. Many times that's where the magic lives. 

 "Real People, Real Performances."

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silvertone

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,777 Member Since:26/01/2011

#6 [url]

Jan 14 15 9:29 AM

Yep, the magic is usually in the first or second take. After that people may become too confident or comfortable in their performance. It may be more slick sounding or tighter but it usually looses some of the emotion once that happens... and music should be all about the emotional experience of the listener.

Some may argue this but most of the music that stands the test of time is built on performance not perfection. YMMV

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,682 Member Since:14/02/2011

#7 [url]

Jan 14 15 10:42 AM

Oh I agree, but I think it's important to do a little work prior to getting into the studio and settling in.

Do 3 takes of each tune and move on.

OK it's cold here

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