avatar

podgorny

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,306 Member Since:27/01/2011

#45 [url]

Nov 12 16 12:13 AM

gold wrote:

 

I don't see why it would cost $150,000 for an acoustician to consult on the space. Sure, there are acousticians who are expensive (and a couple of them who are worth every penny), but for this type of project, an afternoon with someone who has successfully built the kind of room you're hoping to build could save you a huge amount of money and headache in the long run.

Kyle Mann :: www.kylemann.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

hank alrich

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,732 Member Since:28/01/2011

#46 [url]

Nov 12 16 11:05 AM

Back in 2009 we visited Jerry Tubb for a mastering job. My singing daughter attended, and we had our instruments in her car. We didn't want to leave those in the parking lot so we brought them into Terra Nova to stash during the session. Before mastering began, Jerry asked us to play him a fiddle tune in his mastering room. This bit about "create a good listening room" is right on the nailhead. The sound was gloriously _accurate_ and delicious.

hank alrich
http://hankandshaidrimusic.com/
http://www.youtube.com/walkinaymusic

Quote    Reply   
avatar

gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,468 Member Since:27/01/2011

#47 [url]

Nov 12 16 12:43 PM

silvertone wrote:
Let me preface this by saying what I am talking about below is a good natural listening room.  Not an acoustically isolated environment like a studio live or control room would be. You can times the cost below by 10 if you are talking about doing an acoustically controlled environment.  Which is not needed to make a mastering room.

 

Exactly. I came up with my number as a rough estmate of hiring an acoustician to design the room and hiring contractors to build it. The space in question will not be difficult to get to sound good. Scott is probably not as dumb as he looks...If he had limitied space and needed isolation then I would say an acoustician is mandatory. You have to know exactly what you are doing to get something like that to work. A large space that doesn't require a lot of isolation is about as good as you can hope for in a listening space.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,190 Member Since:29/01/2011

#48 [url]

Nov 12 16 2:04 PM

gold wrote:
.A large space that doesn't require a lot of isolation is about as good as you can hope for in a listening space.
 

yep. my sole criteria for moving was: i need a place where i can put in a nice big room that doesn't require a ton of isolation. my room here is a nice size, 13'5"x16'10"x21'3" (a friendly 1:1.26:1.59 ratio) and i wasn't gonna settle for anything smaller. i didn't want to have to cram a studio into a tiny garage or something. fortunately we found this place without too much trouble.
Scott is probably not as dumb as he looks...


i wear glasses. so i look smart. all a lie. i'm dumb as a stump. 
podgorny wrote:
for this type of project, an afternoon with someone...


yes, that is what i'd like to do. for the meagre amount i'm able to pay someone, i'd like to take up as little of their time as possible. so i'd like to be able to say "here's my plan, tell me what's wrong with it" rather than "hey yeah i wanna build a studio! let me ask you 50 million questions at once! while i'm at it can you just sketch out a design on this cocktail napkin here?" 

i like learning about this stuff, it's really interesting. so i'm getting my idea together and hopefully won't sound like a complete idiot when i talk to someone.
silvertone wrote:
10k should be enough if you do most of the work yourself.


putting the I in DIY. most of this should be no problem to do myself. the stuff i definitely can't or don't want to do is just:

1. removing the garage door opener/rails
2. the entry door might need to be moved. seems like that'd be a straightforward thing for someone who knows what they're doing. which isn't me.
3. i'm comfy wiring outlets and running romex, but anything with the panel that's more involved than switching breakers on and off, yeah no. i'm friendly with the electrician who did some work at the loft here, i'll call him for help if i need it.



 

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,190 Member Since:29/01/2011

#49 [url]

Nov 15 16 1:03 PM

since i'm gonna be building a new studio, i'm not sad about leaving my current room, but i am gonna miss the living room for sure:

image

that space has been a lot of different shapes and sizes over the years, and all of them have made for entertaining drum sounds. i am unlikely to ever have a room this big again:(


 

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,190 Member Since:29/01/2011

#50 [url]

Jan 14 17 11:10 AM

bump for a couple funny pix:

i meant to post this one yesterday, in honor of friday the 13th....my old room emptied out and looking like a horror movie:

image
and here at the new house, here's a pile of drywall with ms mse for scale:

image

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,190 Member Since:29/01/2011

#52 [url]

Feb 2 17 10:47 AM

gimme a day or two and i'll have a better version of the pic i could take now. that stack of drywall is a little shorter than it was....

it's coming along. i am of course way behind schedule....it took awhile just to get the house together, get a little temporary studio set up, etc.

and then last week brought a big setback....we had a couple days of torrential rain, and my lovely new studio space flooded. there were no gutters on it, of course it flooded. it's been a really rainy month, i was wary of the lack of gutters and surprised it'd stayed dry as long as it did. anyway when it finally failed it did so in dramatic fashion. i was on top of it, so i got everything up off the floor really quick. of course, it didn't really start to get bad until about 10 at night, and then it stayed bad. so i just stayed up all night and went out once an hour and shoveled the water out. finally about 7am or so it stopped coming in.

shoveling water. ridiculous. it works though.

so that was quite an eventful day. i called the gutter guys the next day, they came out this week and did the job lickety split. i'm all about DIY, and putting up gutters sure doesn't seem too complicated but i just didn't want to deal, and it felt good to just pay professionals and have it be done.

anyway, no one wants their space to flood, but i'm soooooo glad it happened NOW and not a few months from now. best thing that could've happened really.

so aside from that it's just been your basic frames, insulation and drywall so far. still working on the exterior shell, gonna be a bit till i get to the fun stuff.

i'm not doing any of the dumb stuff i talked about earlier in the thread, just keeping it all real simple and straightforward.

another cup of coffee and then it's time for more framing.

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,935 Member Since:23/01/2011

#54 [url]

Feb 2 17 11:47 AM

morespaceecho wrote:
...shoveling water. ridiculous. it works though...

...anyway, no one wants their space to flood, but i'm soooooo glad it happened NOW and not a few months from now. best thing that could've happened really...

In an emergency it seems to me you can move, or redirect, water with a broom or pushbroom as well.  Not the most effective, but not totally ineffective either.  

I happen to think it's a good omen when things go badly at the start: you get the crappy part out of the way instead of 'waiting for the shoe to drop'.  

Quote    Reply   
avatar

soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,044 Member Since:04/02/2011

#55 [url]

Feb 2 17 1:14 PM

maarvold wrote:

morespaceecho wrote:
...shoveling water. ridiculous. it works though...

...anyway, no one wants their space to flood, but i'm soooooo glad it happened NOW and not a few months from now. best thing that could've happened really...

In an emergency it seems to me you can move, or redirect, water with a broom or pushbroom as well.  Not the most effective, but not totally ineffective either.  

I happen to think it's a good omen when things go badly at the start: you get the crappy part out of the way instead of 'waiting for the shoe to drop'.  

I always hate when the rehearsal before the show goes really well.

Wise move on calling the professionals to do the gutters... like Andy Griffith told Aunt Bea, "call the man."

brad allen williams

Quote    Reply   
avatar

seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,477 Member Since:26/01/2011

#56 [url]

Feb 2 17 3:06 PM

You're sure it wasn't ground water pushing its way up through the slab? I had that problem which was no worse than a few wet spots when the water table was very high, though it culminated in two feet of water when a sump pump failed. I got really good french drains with three pumps in the sump - primary and secondary AC pumps and one DC with a battery backup. Works great, my basement is dry as a bone. In your case now would be the time to do that.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,190 Member Since:29/01/2011

#58 [url]

Feb 2 17 11:20 PM

water is indeed the worst. i still have PTSD from the leaky roof fiasco at the loft a couple years ago. this was easy breezy compared to that. of course that was a horrible, months-long nightmare...

i haven't sealed up the joints yet, i'm gonna ask my contractor friend about the best way of doing that. where the sides meet the slab definitely needs attention. but i figured gutters were the obvious first thing to do. not having 100s of gallons of water pouring down 3 inches from the foundation is probably a good start.

my slab has a bunch of seams....it's basically 6 10x10 squares. when we were looking at the house, the realtor was going on about "oh this is great he put the seams in here because blah blah blah"...i wasn't really paying attention. but there was definitely moisture coming up through those, and some hairline cracks as well. not enough to cause flooding, that was for sure due to water coming in from the sides, but still.....i would really much rather no moisture coming in at all! another question for my contractor friend. 

also, whoever built this thing did a fine job but they built a parallelogram instead of a rectangle. 

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,477 Member Since:26/01/2011

#59 [url]

Feb 5 17 10:43 AM

MSE, my basement has seams and cracks in the floor. Most often we had some very minor damp spots. On rare occasions, if the water table was already high and we had serious rain, we'd get puddles an eighth of an inch deep, a half inch in some low spots. We were used to it so we didn't keep anything on the floor. The disaster was when the sump pump failed in the middle of the night and we had 18 inches before I knew anything was wrong. But you should understand that the water doesn't come in from the sides, it comes straight up from underneath as the water table rises closer to the surface. Hydrostatic pressure is immense and it will force water right up through the cracks and seams. French drains or footing drains provide a path of less resistance to the sides and keeps the water from building up enough pressure to force its way up. I used these guys: http://www.basementsystems.com/ and they did a great job. My basement is now bone dry and I have the system cleaned and the battery replaced every two years or so. This is an area I'd urge you not to skimp and to take VERY seriously. My system was expensive but it works flawlessly. My parents had a cheap job done and it helps but their basement is still wet. I watched one of my guitar cases leisurely float by like a canoe, and I never want to see that again.

Last Edited By: seth Feb 5 17 10:49 AM. Edited 2 times.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,190 Member Since:29/01/2011

#60 [url]

Feb 7 17 12:32 AM

yeah i've had enough battles with water in my life already. we have a bunch of rain coming again this week so we'll see how seaworthy this ship is now with its nice new gutters.

anyway here is a totally unexciting pic of the progress so far:

image

none more gray. concrete sure is ugly. my best friend loves brutalist architecture. i just don't get it.

here's my main assistant:

image

this thing lived at the loft, i couldn't have built my last room without it. i didn't think i'd need it here at the new place so i left it behind. a couple days on the a-frame ladder and i realized the error of my ways. i had to rent a van and go back and get it. it's old and clunky and heavy and missing a wheel....if there's a cable or anything at all on the floor, invariably it will get caught on it, i've sworn at it a thousand times. but it's just so much better than the a-frame. pretty much an old friend at this point.

and you can't build a studio without a soundtrack, here is my boomin sound system:

 image

not-terribly-affectionately dubbed "the shitbox" by ms mse. it sounds awful and has gotten extremely fussy. i have to do a convoluted rain dance/fonzarelli routine to get it to play. but it works.

does anyone know a guy at Polar? i could really use an endorsement deal for that seltzer.
 

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

Quote    Reply   
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help