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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,393 Member Since:04/02/2011

#21 [url]

Nov 5 16 10:22 PM

they didn't.

man there is nothing like a good DeArmond Dynasonic, or a good FilterTron. Both are outstanding in their own unique ways.

Interesting note-- the Alnico V "staple" pickup that was Gibson's top-of-the-line pickup until 1957 (used in the neck position of the Les Paul Custom, and on top-end archtops like L-5CES and Super 400CES) was a straight copy of the DeArmond Dynasonic.

A friend today pointed out that you can find some old pictures of Les Paul using the DeArmond Dynasonic bodged into in the neck position of his guitars, including some of his Gibsons. Putting two-and-two together, it's easy to speculate that he wanted THAT pickup, and that Gibson elected to make a similar design.

The Gibson pickup has little rectangular magnets whereas the DeArmond's magnets were round... otherwise the pickups are near-identical in design (a very mechanically complex design, at that, compared to almost any other magnetic pickup!)

brad allen williams

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,393 Member Since:04/02/2011

#22 [url]

Nov 5 16 10:39 PM

Here's a good pic of what I'm talking about above--

image

That's positively a DeArmond Dynasonic (as used on early Gretsch) incognito, stuffed under a P-90 cover. It's not too much of a stretch to imagine Les and Gibson compromising with Gibson's version... the AlNiCo V "staple" pickup, for the Les Paul Custom the following year (the pickup made its debut around the same time, with R&D taking place mostly during 1953).

In the pictures below, you can see that both use spring-loaded magnet polepieces with individual height-adjusting screws (unlike later adjustable-pole designs, which usually had screw polepieces that were magnetized by a bar magnet, or in the case of the Fender Wide-Range Humbucker, were threaded CuNiFe rod magnets).

Dynasonic:

image
image

AlNiCo V "staple" pickup:

image
image

brad allen williams

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Iggick

Silverado

Posts: 217 Member Since:24/11/2014

#23 [url]

Nov 28 16 10:25 PM

Just wanted to thank everyone, particularly Brad for all the Gretsch info.
In the past I bought and later sold a late 60's Anniversary and a Baldwin era Country Gent.
Saw a used Japanese 6120 in a friends store recently and started to bite, but not in time.
That's what prompted the OP. 
A bit later found a pre FMIC 6022 at GC for a decent price and decided to go with it.
They had it marked as an 85 but as Brad pointed out in a PM, they weren't really making guitars in 85.
Turned out to be a 91. Having it set up now at a local shop.
Single cut, no back pad, real F-holes, no mud switch. Master vol, separate pickup volumes and a tone POT.
Hope the set up turns out OK. Every Gretsch  I've ever played just felt strange, OR not like a Fender or a Gibson.
This isn't it, but is a dead ringer:
a839731945c94e0abf04dba98f5d1e4e_r.jpg

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Tate

Tin Man

Posts: 37 Member Since:25/05/2014

#26 [url]

Dec 10 16 10:20 AM

I've seen it theorized that because 40s-50s-60s USA Gretsch employees were paid on a piece-work basis, workmanship problems might be more likely than if they'd been paid hourly.  Understandably, an employee might rush to complete as much work as rapidly as possible during his or her shift.  Possibly not the best arrangement for optimum QC.  - TF

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