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jerry tubb

Gold Finger

Posts: 654 Member Since:06/02/2011

#22 [url]

Apr 29 17 5:10 PM

One session back in the late 90s, the famous artist showed up with a Texas 5th of bourbon, an extra large box of fried chicken, and a bag of herbs.
At midnight he announced that his entourage was heading over to the gentlemens club for a break!
Upon their return shortly after 2am, we worked thill sunrise, all while coaching me on the EQ settings :~)>
Crazy days!

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John Eppstein

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,271 Member Since:31/05/2015

#23 [url]

Apr 30 17 12:46 AM

zmix wrote:
Look...

Before you demonize the client (and I haven't read any replies, so bear with me), or generate another internetz pile on of slagging, try to understand what that client was feeling.

Most artists have been "burned" or at least feel that they have, somewhere along the process.

Most artists look forward to mastering the same way most people look forward to seeing the dentist.

They expect to feel criticized.

They expect to be shamed.

They expect to be overwhelmed with technical details that only mean "you suck" to them.

Supermodels feel the same way about photo retouchers, by the way. Even though you're going to make the project "better" they feel vulnerable and exposed.

Be sensitive.

Be empathetic.

It's not your baby, it's theirs, have a good bedside manner.

Be aware of your own sensitivity to their criticisms.



...

That's funny, it's the exact opposite of how I felt working with Bob. He did a great job, immediately solved a problem that had had us tearing our hair out without even having to be asked,. and put up with my probably somewhat nitpicky correction requests. 3 or 4 years later I'm a bit less happy with the album, but it's definitely NOT Bob's fault, it's all stuff related to it being the first time working on my own shit and especially my own vocals.

Really looking forward to the next one, if I can just get some takes on those pesky vocals that don't bother me.

I think that a lot of the difficulty with those "problem clients" is that they have way too much experience with having their stuff "mastered" by monkeys....

Hey, that kinda has a ring to it - "Mastered by Monkeys"!

 

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tbethel

Gold Finger

Posts: 306 Member Since:21/02/2011

#24 [url]

Apr 30 17 4:42 AM

Most clients don't really know what a mastering session is all about so they are a little bit anxious. I am going though some cataract surgery at the present time and I was very anxious. I got to the out patient clinic and was met with people who were the ultimate professionals and also had a good sense of humor. My anxiety disappeared instantly. I think that being professional and approachable with a a good sense of humor is the way to make clients feel "at ease". I try never to judge a client or their material and will only "comment" if asked in the course of the mastering. Since more and more mastering is being done over the internet, with the client not in attendance, I think it is important to maintain a good friendly, professional rapport with them from the get go.

FWIW and MTCW

-TOM-
Thomas W. Bethel
Managing Director, Acoustik Musik, Ltd.
www.acoustikmusik.com/
Celebrating 22 years in business in 2017

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chance

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,682 Member Since:30/01/2011

#25 [url]

Apr 30 17 7:50 PM

On the subject of weirdest client ever, You all might remember this post from a while agoimagechanceInteract  Aqua Marine Posts: 2,637 Member Since:30/01/2011#17 Apr 8 15 7:09 AM  

mikerivers wrote: 
chance wrote:
My daughter gave me one of these many years ago and they were actually used on a session. If you haven't heard the story, I'll post it again. Too funny

 
Do tell us. The RNC is a pretty decent compressor. I still have one that gets a fair amount of use when I use a compressor (which isn't very often). But mine doesn't have a cool dashboard.

 
My daughter gave me one of these funklogic do nothing pieces of rack filler. For a breif second I thought it was real, but soon discovered it was a joke. I put it in an empty rack space. I had a group come in for a session. The leader of the group was a very arrogant control freak whom the band worshipped. During mixdown we were searching for a solution for a specific sound. The band leader pointed to the do nothing Funklogic peice and said "lets try that". I told him that it doesn't do anything. His reply to me was "I'LL BE THE JUDGE OF THAT"! I repeated that it was cosmetic and not functional. He insisted LETS TRY IT! He wouldn't conceed to the fact that it was for show only and he and his band insisted we try it. The time came to prove that it didn't do anything so I started turning the knobs and he said START LOW so I turned a knob fully CCW and started up the scale, and he said "YES, I like it", turn it up more. A little more. more. TOO MUCH! Back it off a little. Now bring it up just a tad, A little more, YES!! PERFECT!! All the band members were cheering their control freak leader with praise and admiration.
For the life of me I have no idea what they were hearing. I was behind the board thinking to my self. "If they only knew" I kind of felt abused, but they were on the clock, I was paid, and they were pleased. I guess I did my job, but I will never forget that session.
 Chance Pataki The Musicians Workshop [url=http://www.the-musicians-workshop.com]www.the-musicians-workshop.com musicians.workshop@gte.net Edit     Delete     Quote    Reply     

Chance Pataki The Musicians Workshop www.the-musicians-workshop.com musicians.workshop@gte.net

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silvertone

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,774 Member Since:26/01/2011

#27 [url]

May 1 17 5:47 AM

"In Mastering we stay quardanoid (4 times paranoid) as the client comes in octanoid (8 times paranoid)". The late great Denny Purcell.

"Mastering is the sobering experience", Bernie Grundman. (In other words no more hyping yourself up like when you recording and overdubbing. Here reality hits the road. Mastering is no place to BS anybody as the results are life long).

When someone hires me I am a member of the team. I work for the song first, the client second and my ego never. It is their art, their vision. I try to understand where it comes from, who they are talking to and the best way to deliver that experience.

I will do partial masters to start as we discover this road together. I am there to guide and help and I make that very clear from the beginning. 

Chuck, you talk of some mastering engineers of yesteryear I think. I've been in on those sessions with some really big name ME's. I would think "if I was doing this, I would never treat a client like some of them treated their WELL PAYING clients". No communication. Acting God like. Trying to impress, acting bored or worst, just didn't care about what they were working on. Just horrible people IMHO. Only happened a couple times but really, once was more than enough.

Most of the ME I know today go out of their way for the client. Most are super nice, sweetheart human beings whose only concern is the music and their clients satisfaction... certainly all the ME's here at PRW are this way.

Silvertone Mastering, celebrating 28 years in business.

www.silvertonemastering.com

Last Edited By: silvertone May 1 17 5:50 AM. Edited 1 time.

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,949 Member Since:20/01/2011

#28 [url]

May 3 17 10:30 PM

morespaceecho wrote:

 


i REALLY don't think that's how artists feel AT ALL. if they do, then they shouldn't, because that isn't even remotely how i (and i assume everyone else who's any good) interact with them.

i never criticize people. shame them? what is this, church? i never talk technical stuff at all unless they bring it up first.

we're here to help. i think most people look forward to mastering because it means THEY'RE DONE.

 
I agree

that's not how anyone I've ever brought to mastering feels


I expect mastering to be an easy and pleasant experience, and I cultivate that expectation in clients.

 

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,390 Member Since:04/02/2011

#29 [url]

May 4 17 7:58 AM

weedywet wrote:

morespaceecho wrote:

 


i REALLY don't think that's how artists feel AT ALL. if they do, then they shouldn't, because that isn't even remotely how i (and i assume everyone else who's any good) interact with them.

i never criticize people. shame them? what is this, church? i never talk technical stuff at all unless they bring it up first.

we're here to help. i think most people look forward to mastering because it means THEY'RE DONE.

 
I agree

that's not how anyone I've ever brought to mastering feels


I expect mastering to be an easy and pleasant experience, and I cultivate that expectation in clients.


 

same, in my experience.

brad allen williams

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,159 Member Since:20/01/2011

#30 [url]

May 4 17 6:01 PM

You guys are just lucky I guess, seems I'm always calming artists before and after mastering, and despite that they are usually on edge.. One artist I knew was really upset that the mastering engineer didn't say one kind word the entire session, you could look at that from both of their perspectives, but it's not always so pleasant for some.

I've worked with some great mastering engineers and some real dickheads, and it's hard to imagine what these things are like for an artist.

When I'm mastering someones project, I make sure that they feel completely at ease, and that they understand the what when why who and how of it all..

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silvertone

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,774 Member Since:26/01/2011

#33 [url]

May 5 17 5:06 AM

zmix wrote:

weedywet wrote:Well, avoiding working with dickheads is ALWAYS a good idea. 

Unfortunately there are some pretty talented dickheads out there...

So true.

Although dickheads have something to teach you... it's called "what not to be".

Favorite part of the dick for some...

Silvertone Mastering, celebrating 28 years in business.

www.silvertonemastering.com

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,139 Member Since:23/01/2011

#34 [url]

May 5 17 8:56 AM

silvertone wrote:

zmix wrote:

weedywet wrote:Well, avoiding working with dickheads is ALWAYS a good idea. 

Unfortunately there are some pretty talented dickheads out there...

So true.

Although dickheads have something to teach you... it's called "what not to be".

Favorite part of the dick for some...

 
EEK!!

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,514 Member Since:27/01/2011

#35 [url]

May 5 17 11:31 AM

zmix wrote:
When I'm mastering someones project, I make sure that they feel completely at ease,

 
My goal for all attended sessions is to have the client fall asleep. It doesn't happen too often but when it does I'm happy.

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morespaceecho

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,323 Member Since:29/01/2011

#36 [url]

May 5 17 1:24 PM

i had that happen once. "your couch is so.....zzzzzz......comfortable.....zzzzz....."

weirdest client encounter i ever had was this one guy who was nice enough but didn't laugh at a single one of my many jokes.

difficult to believe, i know. BUT TRUE.

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,949 Member Since:20/01/2011

#37 [url]

May 5 17 5:45 PM

Well there WAS one reasonably well known Record Plant engineer who when he wanted to end the late session would put a Quaalude in a certain producer's coffee...

"Boy, i'm really starting to fade... maybe we should call it a night..."

 

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sbm

Silverado

Posts: 121 Member Since:22/02/2011

#38 [url]

May 7 17 4:22 PM

morespaceecho wrote:
weirdest client encounter i ever had was this one guy who was nice enough but didn't laugh at a single one of my many jokes.


 

And if you're like me, you were only encouraged to keep trying.

Cass Anawaty, Mastering Engineer www.sunbreakmusic.com

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,626 Member Since:26/01/2011

#40 [url]

May 8 17 8:30 AM

morespaceecho wrote:

weirdest client encounter i ever had was this one guy who was nice enough but didn't laugh at a single one of my many jokes.

difficult to believe, i know. BUT TRUE.
 

They used to say that about Richard Nixon - he loved to hear jokes but he never laughed at them, he'd say, "That's very funny, very funny."

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