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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,312 Member Since:04/02/2011

#21 [url]

Jan 25 17 1:35 PM

I get that George! I guess I just tend to think "well while I'm in here, I might as well spend 5 bucks and make it so I never have to think about it again."

brad allen williams

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,060 Member Since:20/01/2011

#22 [url]

Jan 28 17 9:24 AM

soapfoot wrote:
I have an electrosocket on my '70s thinline. I like it.

Regarding Chuck's point--

more so than the thread length of the jack itself, it's making sure you remove the little rectangular metal "washer" that's embedded in the wood in the original jack setup. I'm not sure what the name for this part is called, but it's possible to install the electrosocket with it in place-- and if you do, many right-angle plugs will not stay in reliably... they will "work," but just fall out.

The part on the right in the picture below is the part you want to make sure you REMOVE from the wood before using the electrosocket:

image

Here is an example of what I was referring to , this is the jack from one of my friend's Klein guitars.  If you use a plug with an oversized barrel, it tends to pop out...

(Why does lefora insist on rotating this image 90˚ ccw?)


Klein%20Jack%20IMG_7429.JPG

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,312 Member Since:04/02/2011

#23 [url]

Jan 28 17 9:55 AM

Yes, Chuck, that's the electrosocket.

I can't speak for the futuristic Klein, but on the Tele it CAN be installed with the part on the right of my pic left in place. If you do, it will look much like the image you've posted-- the threads of the jack "buried" in the electrosocket, and most right-angle plugs will "eject" themselves.

However, if you REMOVE the stock part entirely (including the part to the right in my pic), it will work much better, and will be compatible with most right-angle plugs. Below is an image from my 1974 Tele Thinline, with electrosocket installed. It didn't always look like that-- BEFORE I had removed the toothed spacer embedded in the wood of the stock guitar, it looked almost exactly like yours.

But I got frustrated one day, went in and tapped that part out, and now you can see that the standard Switchcraft #11 jack protrudes nicely, sticking out enough to allow the standard right-angle plug plenty of purchase.

image

image

brad allen williams

Last Edited By: soapfoot Jan 28 17 10:02 AM. Edited 2 times.

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,060 Member Since:20/01/2011

#24 [url]

Jan 28 17 11:57 AM

soapfoot wrote:
Yes, Chuck, that's the electrosocket.
I'm glad you understand that, Brad.  :)

As I  said, I posted the photo to illustrate the issue I had warned in my initial post:

zmix wrote:
If you use the electrosocket make sure the switchcraft jack you choose has a long enough threaded barrel to protrude sufficiently, so that the plug isn't forced out by that ridiculous tapered convex curve...

I've seen certain plugs that just pop out of those...


Obviously Klein has a certain aesthetic standard, which the machined electrosocket seems to fit (except, I'd argue, for the ugly dual Phillips screws to mount it..!), but this has caused some practical concerns.  Also the Klein will rest on the plug when you set it down to lean it against an amp or a wall..   :(

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