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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,772 Member Since: 20/01/2011

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Mar 11 17 11:49 PM

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I don't care whether you consider this a "political" post or not.

all of us in the music business, or arts in general, should be concerned about this... and its potential repercussions.

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2017/03/10/519707931/italian-band-soviet-soviet-denied-entry-to-the-u-s-jailed-and-then-deported?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social

 

Last Edited By: weedywet Mar 12 17 10:56 AM. Edited 1 time

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,044 Member Since:04/02/2011

#3 [url]

Mar 12 17 7:38 AM

The silver lining for the band and label is that the "promotional tour" was a success even though it didn't happen.

I can guarantee that Soviet Soviet got more publicity from this than if they had actually played the shows, and the band themselves allegedly make the same amount of money (which is nothing).

brad allen williams

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waltzmastering

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,585 Member Since:02/02/2011

#4 [url]

Mar 12 17 7:55 AM

morespaceecho wrote:
completely  fucked. 

Couldn't have said it more eloquently.
Lots of other stuff going sideways too.
Makes GB43 look sane

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,476 Member Since:26/01/2011

#7 [url]

Mar 12 17 9:18 AM

It's funny, if you read the whole statement the rationale for denying them entry is that they were playing a couple of shows where admission was being charged and therefore they needed work visas rather than visitors visas. That could be legit, maybe they needed better logistical support while setting up the tour. There is no justification for they way they were treated.

Many years ago I got a very thorough grilling on my way into Canada to play on a session at Le Studio in Montreal. I had a letter from the label and from the management of the artist, and as I said, I got a very thorough and serious questioning. They were, however, very courteous and polite.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,044 Member Since:04/02/2011

#8 [url]

Mar 12 17 10:04 AM

I've traveled to many countries for the purpose of playing music for money. Probably about 20 countries, including some countries with very tight security like Israel.

I never had a harder time or more thorough grilling than Canada. They almost denied me entry because my passport photo was slightly over-exposed (that is not an exaggeration).

brad allen williams

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dougrogers

Silverado

Posts: 134 Member Since:21/02/2011

#9 [url]

Mar 12 17 10:31 AM

Sounds like a publicity stunt to me ... and it's working, every record company knows bands need a work visa to perform in the USA, super easy to get.

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,772 Member Since:20/01/2011

#10 [url]

Mar 12 17 10:59 AM

there was a kerfuffle around SXSW in general this year because of the wording of some "warning" they gave foreign bands about playing other shows outside of the festival... but the underlying gist was that MOST of their foreign acts don't have true work visas.

they almost all come in on that ESTA option...

I don't read this as a stunt.

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weedywet

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Posts: 5,772 Member Since:20/01/2011

#11 [url]

Mar 12 17 11:10 AM

In a very detailed Facebook post related to last week’s controversy about immigration language in the SXSW contract, immigration lawyer Matthew Covey, who’s co-presenting the Contrabanned: #MusicUnites showcase next Friday at the fest, explained that artists are able to use the Visa Waiver Program, to perform at SXSW without employment visas “under a narrow exception to the law carved out for performances that are effectively auditions… ‘bona fide industry showcases.'”

“The problem however is that the applicability of the ‘showcase exception’ to SXSW is something of a legal grey area, given that SXSW is kind of an audition, but it’s also kind of a party,” he wrote. “The vast majority of artists who enter the U.S. to perform at SXSW without employment visas do so successfully, but this is because U.S. Department of State and Customs and Border Protection are—so far—playing ball. Presumably they recognize that SXSW is in the interests of American commerce, and poses little threat to American security or labor interests”

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dougrogers

Silverado

Posts: 134 Member Since:21/02/2011

#12 [url]

Mar 12 17 11:49 AM

weedywet wrote:
there was a kerfuffle around SXSW in general this year because of the wording of some "warning" they gave foreign bands about playing other shows outside of the festival... but the underlying gist was that MOST of their foreign acts don't have true work visas.

they almost all come in on that ESTA option...

I don't read this as a stunt.

So the others broke the law and didn't get caught, doesn't make it right, bet you never heard of SOVIET SOVIET until now.

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owlander

Gold Finger

Posts: 993 Member Since:27/01/2011

#15 [url]

Mar 12 17 1:30 PM

"We are already receiving reports of artists being held and detained for hours upon entering the U.S. to determine whether or not they are performing," Goldstein said. "Even artists entering as visitors for the purpose of attending a conference or 'performing a showcase' are being pulled aside and, in many cases, being refused entry."

Ever watched Border Security? Great Canadian show. It highlights the extent to which people will attempt to conceal truth(not saying that's what happened here). Said visitor is asked a bunch of basic questions. Then, cell phones are taken, passwords, online passwords to social networking, etc, etc...and are analyzed carefully. Then, based on what they find, the real questioning begins.

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morespaceecho

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Posts: 2,190 Member Since:29/01/2011

#16 [url]

Mar 12 17 1:34 PM

that this would be a stunt seems totally illogical to me.

if your label/manager came to you and said "guys guys i have a great idea for a publicity stunt! we'll fly to the US, ostensibly to play some showcases, but really what we want is for you to get busted by customs so we can make a big deal out of it. all you'll have to do is sit and answer questions for hours, then be searched, handcuffed and jailed overnight. and then searched and handcuffed again the next day before being sent home. sounds amazing doesn't it? you won't get to play a note of music but cmon, it's every musician's dream to spend the night in jail in a foreign country!"

you'd say "oh yeah, sounds great boss!"

right.

www.oldcolonymastering.com

morespaceecho.bandcamp.com

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maarvold

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,933 Member Since:23/01/2011

#17 [url]

Mar 12 17 2:01 PM

weedywet wrote:
they didn't "break the law"

the law specifically allows a different kind of entrance requirement for a showcase

 
I don't have 'a dog in this hunt', but reading about it reminds me of some timeworn advice I heard at a fairly early age: "Don't piss off a bureaucrat".  I'm not saying these guys did that, but the whole thing is a reminder about how 'sticky' things can get when bureaucrats become involved.  

bu·reau·crat
[ˈbyo͝orəˌkrat] 
NOUN
  1. an official in a government department, in particular one perceived as being concerned with procedural correctness at the expense of people's needs.

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dougrogers

Silverado

Posts: 134 Member Since:21/02/2011

#18 [url]

Mar 12 17 2:09 PM

weedywet wrote:
they didn't "break the law"

the law specifically allows a different kind of entrance requirement for a showcase

How do you know their entry was limited to a showcase? As part of that questioning CBP may have looked at their social media sites where a tour was announced. The fact is a reason was discovered to deny entry. One bit of advice I followed as an immigrant myself that went through a lengthy process to become a citizen, if you lie to the US government, no matter who is in charge, and they find out, you are toast.

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chance

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,537 Member Since:30/01/2011

#19 [url]

Mar 12 17 2:33 PM

In the late 70's when Bill Bonham moved here from England, we became friends and he needed a place to show employment and "on paper only" he was working for me at United Audio. For a while he lived in the studio. I think he was here on a work visa, but later went through the process for legal citizenship. Entry was much easier back then.

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harland

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Posts: 916 Member Since:05/02/2011

#20 [url]

Mar 13 17 12:22 AM

I wouldn't jump up and down and look at this as a Trump thing or post 911 thing. Many years ago, back in the 80's I had a regular Sunday aft/eve gig just across the border. The band had been doing this for years, the owner of the club (who also owned a club in Vancouver where we had the house gig) handling all the Visa work so that we just had to pick them up once a month at the border. One time the owner told us that the Visas were late so just come across as if we were going down as regular Sunday bar hoppers. During the first set border guards came in and arrested us right off the stage. They confiscated our gear and took us to jail, each in our own cell so that we couldn't speak with each other and we each went through some serious interrogation. Hours later they escorted us to the border and that was the last time we ever played there. We did get our gear back.

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