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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,982 Member Since:20/01/2011

#22 [url]

soapfoot wrote:
the narrow neck is the "A" width. It's relatively rare. On a '74 Fender there's no easy way to tell. On a '60s Fender, the nut width is on the date stamp at the end of the neck.

Almost all Fenders were the standard "B" width.

The neck stamp on my '62 jazzmaster says "4OCT62B." This means it was a jazzmaster neck (jazzmaster code is "4") made sometime in October if 1962 with the standard "B" width neck. 4 means "jazzmaster," not the 4th of October.

There was also a "C" width, which was larger and wider. This was pretty rare, too.

by the time your '74 was made CBS had gone to a different, less-easily-decoded date code system for the necks.
Indeed:

KIF_1446.JPG



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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,162 Member Since:04/02/2011

#23 [url]

zmix wrote:
Jeeze Brad... clearly I was teasing you (note the use of the word "seriously" in the subsequent sentence.....) touchy..!!

haha fair enough.

sometimes subtleties of sarcasm are tricky to decode via this medium!

brad allen williams

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,162 Member Since:04/02/2011

#24 [url]

Also-- very interesting end grain on that neck. Looks perhaps to have been cut from a small piece of timber. Not quite quarter-sawn, not quite plain-sawn.

Many of my favorite old Fender necks I've noticed have end grain that's somewhere in between those two extremes, with the grain lines running somewhat diagonally (usually when this is the case, it's closer to quarter-sawn than to plain sawn)

brad allen williams

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,641 Member Since:14/02/2011

#25 [url]

Well I'm with you on pulling the instrument apart and getting the mung off of it. It took me 4 hours of hard cleaning to get all the extra polish and nicotine off the body of the guitar.
That's interesting about the flat pole pickups. I pulled the original pickguard intact and replaced it with a white one with the pickups I mentioned earlier. The original has some issues like a broken tone pot and for some reason the cap is split in half. It was rattling in the cavity, I had thought it was part of the pot I was hearing but no.

I need to pull the neck to check the adjustment as something is funky the way the tilt is set up so I'll take some pics to post just for reference.
The bridge is missing some saddles so I think I will upgrade that with a Callaham.

OK it's cold here

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,982 Member Since:20/01/2011

#26 [url]

soapfoot wrote:
Also-- very interesting end grain on that neck. Looks perhaps to have been cut from a small piece of timber. Not quite quarter-sawn, not quite plain-sawn.

Many of my favorite old Fender necks I've noticed have end grain that's somewhere in between those two extremes, with the grain lines running somewhat diagonally (usually when this is the case, it's closer to quarter-sawn than to plain sawn)
It's the first maple neck / fingerboard I've owned.. it's very lively and responsive..  I was surprised to learn last night via a fender video about"The Edge" signature strat that he had to specify quarter sawn for his neck...  is the other method called "slab cut"?

Also, they stated that the larger headstock required a larger neck blank, so go figure on that small grain pattern...

One more point:  note how the grain goes diagonally across the fingerboard, my other maple neck fender (72 telecaster) has almost no visible grain on the fingerboard).KIF_1448.JPG

Last Edited By: zmix . Edited 1 time.

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,982 Member Since:20/01/2011

#27 [url]

spiritwalker wrote:
Well I'm with you on pulling the instrument apart and getting the mung off of it. It took me 4 hours of hard cleaning to get all the extra polish and nicotine off the body of the guitar.
That's interesting about the flat pole pickups. I pulled the original pickguard intact and replaced it with a white one with the pickups I mentioned earlier. The original has some issues like a broken tone pot and for some reason the cap is split in half. It was rattling in the cavity, I had thought it was part of the pot I was hearing but no.

I need to pull the neck to check the adjustment as something is funky the way the tilt is set up so I'll take some pics to post just for reference.
The bridge is missing some saddles so I think I will upgrade that with a Callaham.

I have a set of "graph tec" saddles if you're interested..

Also, Re: cleaning.. my 1979 was so coated in layers of guitar or furniture polish it felt like pure wax..  so sticky and disgusting..!!  I tried everything to remove the wax, from Ammonia to warm water.. finally I asked my Mother, she tild me that Naptha would remove the wax without harming the polyurathane, she said it was sold under the trade name "Ronsonol" and that they'd check my ID when I bought it because apparently the kids are huffing it these days.. 

I must say it was incredible (see the "after" picture I posted a page back).  I called it "The Jimi Hendrix Guitar cleaning solution"


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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,162 Member Since:04/02/2011

#28 [url]

Naphtha is the trick! Safe for lacquer as well.

Sometimes when an old lacquer finish gets "sticky" I'll just leave it alone. This is because of one particular odd thing that happens--

Humans have varying amounts of triglycerides in their skin oil. If a person has high blood cholesterol, they can secrete rather large amounts of triglycerides. 

Triglycerides, in addition to being a type of fat, are also effective plasticizers. In extreme cases, especially if the guitar is never cleaned, a person's body funk can seem to permanently soften the lacquer. Attempting to clean or polish makes it into a smeary mess. Sometimes you keep going and going and going, and the "funk" never comes off. The lacquer has been permanently softened and damaged! I've had two guitars with this condition.

brad allen williams

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,162 Member Since:04/02/2011

#29 [url]

Oh yeah, I always use "plain sawn" to describe what some call "slab cut" but it's essentially the same thing. 

Quarter sawn wood is stronger. They first cut the log into quarters (wedges or pie slices, so to speak... If the entire log were conceived as a really tall pie) and then cut flat boards off either face of each wedge, or quarter. 

Plain sawn wood is just taking the log and slicing the whole length of the log. This gives you really wide lumber in the middle and is by far more efficient with less waste, but the lumber isn't as rigid not as resistant to warping.

quarter sawn necks definitely sound different. They need less truss rod tension to stay straight. My impression over the years is that they tend to present as a little brighter sounding, or focused-sounding. Probably just a result of the stiffness.

brad allen williams

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,641 Member Since:14/02/2011

#30 [url]

In all the builds I've done, three of them now I have ordered quarter sawn necks. The temperature changes can really move plain sawn necks, especially if they were a little green to start with. The QS necks I've been getting seem to be solid with very little shrinkage.

OK it's cold here

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,641 Member Since:14/02/2011

#31 [url]

zmix wrote:

 


Also, Re: cleaning.. my 1979 was so coated in layers of guitar or furniture polish it felt like pure wax..  so sticky and disgusting..!!  I tried everything to remove the wax, from Ammonia to warm water.. finally I asked my Mother, she tild me that Naptha would remove the wax without harming the polyurathane, she said it was sold under the trade name "Ronsonol" and that they'd check my ID when I bought it because apparently the kids are huffing it these days.. 

I must say it was incredible (see the "after" picture I posted a page back).  I called it "The Jimi Hendrix Guitar cleaning solution"

I used Murphy oil soap. It worked great at cleaning the mung on the body and gave the fret board a little bit of moisture back.
I live in what is considered a semi-arid climate

OK it's cold here

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,641 Member Since:14/02/2011

#32 [url]

So does anyone have any experience with the Callaham Full Aluminum pickguard shield?
I know that these used to be common on 60's Stratocasters. I'm wondering if it's something I should consider as an upgrade?

Chuck did you shield the inside of the guitar or just leave it stock?
Did you upgrade the pots and cap?

OK it's cold here

Last Edited By: spiritwalker . Edited 1 time.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,162 Member Since:04/02/2011

#33 [url]

The shield most likely will have little-to-no effect on single coil hum. If you're having issues with other types of noise, it can possibly be worthwhile

sounds like your cap is broken, so you'll need to replace it. I would leave the pots alone if they're functional. They'll be the same (CTS most likely, possibly Stackpole) spec pots Fender used in the glory days... Indeed there's even a chance they will have 1966 date codes, as CBS bought a MASSIVE lot of pots in '66 that took them several years to use up.

theyre at least as good as (maybe better than) most new pots you'd get today

brad allen williams

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,982 Member Since:20/01/2011

#34 [url]

spiritwalker wrote:
So does anyone have any experience with the Callaham Full Aluminum pickguard shield?
I know that these used to be common on 60's Stratocasters. I'm wondering if it's something I should consider as an upgrade?

Chuck did you shield the inside of the guitar or just leave it stock?
Did you upgrade the pots and cap?

I left them bone stock..   

Interesting note: I "upgraded" a Harmony Airline "Strat-o-Tone"  re-issue with high quality Bornes conductive plastic pots and within 2 years they were scratchy, where as none of the CTS pots in any of my guitars from the 50s-70s have any issues whatsoever. 

If they ain't broke...


Please read the "Jazz Bass" upgrades thread for my (our) thoughts on shielding, etc...

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,162 Member Since:04/02/2011

#36 [url]

If you do have a defective pot that can't be fixed by cleaning/lubrication and must be replaced, RS Guitarworks sells some overpriced-but-nice CTS pots made to their spec by CTS. Nice metal shafts, spec'd with a tight tolerance of resistance value, and (they allege) a 'special' taper that's more like the old audio taper (as opposed to modern audio taper, which typically has some kinks in the sweep and only very loosely approximates a true logarithmic curve).

Mojo Musical Supply has their own spec from CTS which is VERY similar for quite a bit less money. I usually use these. 

I throw them in the guitar and never think about them again, which probably means they're more than good enough

brad allen williams

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,162 Member Since:04/02/2011

#37 [url]

The RS pot--

To tell the truth, I have no idea what they could possibly mean when they say it's designed specifically to be used as a volume control, and not a tone control.

I can't fathom a reason a pot would work well for one application and not for another, except perhaps that maybe this $10 pot is overkill in a tone control application, where the sweep/taper is seldom critical. Who knows.

https://rs-guitarworks.myshopify.com/collections/loose-electronic-parts/products/rs-guitarworks-280k-superpot-split-shaft

brad allen williams

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spiritwalker

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,641 Member Since:14/02/2011

#38 [url]

In this case the shaft was broken off on the bottom tone control. So I took the case off of it and put it on another new Emerson pot that I had. worked like a charm an still has the date code info. I also bagged and kept the spare parts.

The more I play this instrument the more I like it.
The balance of the truss rod and neck tilt adjustment takes a bit to get what you want, but I can see the benefits of having both.
Three days in and I'm already getting song ideas when I pick it up. That is a very good indication.

OK it's cold here

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,982 Member Since:20/01/2011

#39 [url]

That's good news.. the internet is populated by doubters and frustrated musicians who are hopeful that "if only I do this *one* thing, this instrument will be great..!" but as soon as that first musical idea appears, you begin to see the inherent charm of the instrument, and turn off the browser, turn up the amp!!

PS: Pictures please..!

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John Eppstein

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,175 Member Since:31/05/2015

#40 [url]

spiritwalker wrote:
So does anyone have any experience with the Callaham Full Aluminum pickguard shield?
I know that these used to be common on 60's Stratocasters. I'm wondering if it's something I should consider as an upgrade?

Chuck did you shield the inside of the guitar or just leave it stock?
Did you upgrade the pots and cap?

Mid/late 50s Strats, Precisions, and Jazzmasters, had the full aluminum pickguardactually. Soime early '60s Streats had a thin aluminum -plate under the guard.

If you're having a noise problem you might check out the Illich noise cancelling system.

Last Edited By: John Eppstein . Edited 1 time.

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