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trock.lucasmicrophone

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Posts: 343 Member Since: 11/10/2013

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Apr 22 17 7:43 AM

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I am looking for some good headphones for tracking that don't allow alot of sound out of them. The ones I have now seem to let alot of sound out and I can hear it on the track whenever I have a quieter part going on. They were supposed to be closed but in any track I may be doing some quieter vocals or acoustic i can hear the bleed, click etc.

Just wondering what you like and use then for tracking and silence?

Thanks!
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soapfoot

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Posts: 7,312 Member Since:04/02/2011

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Apr 22 17 7:52 AM

If headphone monitoring level is loud, there will always be some bleed. The best case is to monitor your cue mix at more sensible levels. However, some folks (particularly vocalists) struggle to monitor sensibly.

With click track, there are a few strategies-- first among them turning the click OFF if it's not strictly needed. Second is to ditch the default Pro Tools clave sound in favor of either the MPC click or the UREI click styles, which are much less persistent/problematic in terms of bleed.

Vic Firth does make some super-isolated cans designed for drummers... they're more designed to keep ambient sound OUT of the cans, but they of course work in reverse as well.

Sometimes (often!) taking one ear off helps singers monitor at a more sensible level.

brad allen williams

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seth

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Posts: 5,572 Member Since:26/01/2011

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Apr 22 17 8:17 AM

I like Fostex T20 phones - bleed is manageable and they're comfortable. They also have replaceable cables so you don't have to do major surgery if the molded cable gets funky. Also I find that having a headphone box with a balance pot on each output helps bleed by panning everything to one side if the singer or musician takes off the other ear.

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maarvold

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Apr 22 17 9:00 AM

Sennheiser HD 280 Pro have a lot of isolation, which should allow them to give good results at lower volume.  My friend who recommended them had a pair that sounded fantastic.  Based on his, I recommended them to a friend for his small studio.  Those sounded acceptable, but didn't sound as good as the first pair I heard unfortunately.  But they also had good iso.  If less headphone bleed with acceptable sound is the problem to solve, imo these would be better than Sony 7506's (too bright and scooped--I had one very experienced session player who flatly refused to use them), AKG 140/240 (and similar).  They might also be a bit better at iso than my Audio Technica ATH-M50's.  I noticed that they're using Shure headphones at Capitol now, but I haven't heard them (they used to use Audio Technica's).  

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bob olhsson

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Apr 22 17 10:00 AM

I used $20 drug store Sonys for years. The main causes of headphone bleed are performers taking one side off or placing the cans in front of their ears because they found they could play or sing better in tune that way. Different headphones don't solve that.

www.audiomastery.com Bob's room 615 562-4346 georgetownmasters.com Georgetown Masters 615 254-3233 www.thewombforums.com

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trock.lucasmicrophone

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Posts: 343 Member Since:11/10/2013

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Apr 22 17 2:02 PM

Thanks alot everyone! Bob, good point, I am one who sometimes uses one ear, it helps me sing better so was hoping with a better headphen and lodged on my head i could stop the bleed better. These would be for tracking only. I don't think I have the volume up all that loud but the mic picks up alot at this time. the click is a sharp clack form cubase, and it really gets hear, but def can turn it off.

I'll start checking these out!

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d gauss

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Posts: 1,252 Member Since:17/02/2011

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Apr 22 17 3:15 PM

trock wrote:
 I am one who sometimes uses one ear, it helps me sing better so was hoping with a better headphen and lodged on my head i could stop the bleed better. These would be for tracking only. I don't think I have the volume up all that loud but the mic picks up alot at this time. the click is a sharp clack form cubase, and it really gets hear, but def can turn it off. 

in that situation, i have often done this:  put a mono plugin on your playback mixbus if it doesn't have a mono switch.  pan whole mix to whichever side you keep on your ear.  easy peasy.

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blairl

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Apr 24 17 11:26 AM

I record a lot of large groups that often require tempo maps or click tracks.  They need headphones.  Based on recommendations here at PRW I started buying some Monoprice headphones.  Very inexpensive and surprisingly good sounding--especially for the price.

Monoprice

Headphones inevitably get dropped, stepped on and otherwise abused.  When we opened the studio 25 years ago, we bought a bunch of higher end AKG and Sony headphones.  Over the years they have been abused, repaired, and gradually discarded.  I still have a couple pair of the AKG phones and one Sony that are alive and well.  The Monoprice headphones seem to be pretty durable so far.  I've had one pair go bad.  But, at $16 each, they are eaiser to replace than repair.

The cables are detachable.  They used to come with a long cable.  No more.  But, you can find a longer cable on monoprice for less than $1.

For general use, mass-quantity headphones, I'm satisfied with the Monoprice headpohnes up to this point.

Last Edited By: blairl Apr 24 17 11:30 AM. Edited 2 times.

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soapfoot

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Posts: 7,312 Member Since:04/02/2011

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Apr 24 17 11:44 AM

Yep, the Monoprice headphones are cheap enough to be basically "disposable," and work quite well especially considering their low cost.

brad allen williams

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weedywet

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Apr 24 17 12:44 PM

I've definitely noticed the trend for higher end musicians to come with the in-ear monitors they're already used to wearing 'live' to use in the studio.

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gtoledo3

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Posts: 4,110 Member Since:23/10/2013

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Apr 24 17 1:45 PM

Even though a closed back headphone will lead to less bleed, theoretically, I find that I like open back headphones so much more because of ear fatigue issues. It also seems to keep me from being eager to take one side off.

That said, isolation headphones like Vic Firth are great for tracking drums even if they sound sort of crappy.

Seems to be helpful to have a few different types of headphones. For example, I have some Ultrasones that seem very flat, and I which I like most for general tracking. However, I sometimes tend to like AKG240s if I'm recording myself doing acoustic/vocal stuff, because of how they make the sound cut through a bit differently...I guess they probably have a bit of a peak in a certain part of the spectrum that makes pick attack and some syllable sounds pop in the phones just a bit more.

Somewhere I have bunch of Sony headphones in various states of disrepair, not sure the model, but to cover when a band doesn't have any phones. I thought they really sucked, but if budget is low you have to do what you gotta do.

Last Edited By: gtoledo3 Apr 24 17 1:51 PM. Edited 1 time.

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maarvold

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Apr 24 17 5:04 PM

weedywet wrote:
I've definitely noticed the trend for higher end musicians to come with the in-ear monitors they're already used to wearing 'live' to use in the studio.

 

blairl wrote:
Around our area, most of the session string players bring their own headphones or in-ear monitors.

Yes and yes.  When the string players first started to bring their own single ear phones/buds they were a bit out of control with click bleed because they would buy open back and/or have their own little in-line volume fader which they'd turn up too much: it only took 1 or 2 players to cause a problem.  Now everybody's pretty well figured it out so the problems are far less.  Some of the players now come in with some pretty pricey solutions and I'm sure it makes their job easier.  

I have been very patiently waiting (for over a year) for my Asius ADEL ear buds: I'm told they are finally shipping this month.  These are the buds with the additional membrane that are supposed to play subjectively louder--with less power, as well as being significantly less damaging compared to other sealed ear designs.  The 'buzz' is that they're very good-sounding.  

Last Edited By: maarvold Apr 24 17 5:08 PM. Edited 1 time.

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soapfoot

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Apr 24 17 5:14 PM

I have some in-ear monitors, but prefer old-fashioned cans in the studio. To tell the truth, I don't even enjoy playing live with IEMs... it feels less like "playing in a group" and more like playing along to a recording. If there's a click in the IEMs (i.e. if the act plays with tracks) then it goes a further step down the ladder of musicality into merely "executing sonic tasks in time."

brad allen williams

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