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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,505 Member Since:27/01/2011

#21 [url]

Apr 30 17 1:19 PM

mikerivers wrote:

I think using BNC connectors on a guitar and amplifier is a great idea. The connector makes the ground/shield connection the signal connection so you can connect and disconnect them without a blast of hum. And besides, it will frustrate anyone who steals your guitar. 


 
A guitar is one place I'd stick with the 1/4" connector. When I do my signature double back flip with a twist I'd raather have the cable come out of the guitar then have the cable come out of the connector. The main place I used to use RG58 was a long run to a phono pre. I use RG58 for test cables on the bench.

It can be very confusing ordering the correct cable, BNC connector and crimp die so all fit. I think it took at least three tries beofre I got the right stuff. I have cable, connectors and crimp die for RG59. I think I gave up before I had the right stuff for RG6.

Last Edited By: gold Apr 30 17 1:28 PM. Edited 4 times.

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Mike Rivers

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,503 Member Since:13/10/2012

#22 [url]

Apr 30 17 6:27 PM

gold wrote:
 
A guitar is one place I'd stick with the 1/4" connector. When I do my signature double back flip with a twist I'd raather have the cable come out of the guitar then have the cable come out of the connector. The main place I used to use RG58 was a long run to a phono pre.


 


Oh, well in that case maybe you should  be considering a wireless setup. You could still use a BNC connector on the guitar end of the cable that goes to the transmitter. I remember seeing some sort of magnetic quick-silent-disconnect plug assembly that was designed with the acrobatic guitarist in mind, as a safeguard against getting strangled. I can't remember who makes it, or if anyone ever trusted it to use on stage.

As for me, I'm too old to do a double back flit with a twist. And I play an unplugged guitar so I won't forget to unplug it when I walk off stage.
It can be very confusing ordering the correct cable, BNC connector and crimp die so all fit. I think it took at least three tries beofre I got the right stuff. I have cable, connectors and crimp die for RG59. I think I gave up before I had the right stuff for RG6.



Those tools can get expensive. The best way to get it right is to call a distributor like Arrow who sells a lot of that stuff, tell them what kind of cable you want to use, and they'll sell you the right tools.

Is there some guitar myth about RG-6? RG-6 has lower high frequency loss than RG-59 but you probably don't play too many notes up around 50 MHz even when doing a double back flip. Both the center conductor and insulation are thicker in RG-6 than in RG-59, but the capacitance per foot is darn near identical for the two, and that's what matters most to guitar pickups. But RG-6 is less flexible than RG-59 and might be a nuisance on stage if you move around much. Though maybe you can work up an act where you kick your legs out and spin around a standing piece of the cable.  ;)



For a good time, call mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,568 Member Since:26/01/2011

#23 [url]

Apr 30 17 9:12 PM

Boy, of all the attendant problems with back flips the cable is my last concern. The continued functionality of my spine is much higher on the list.

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,505 Member Since:27/01/2011

#24 [url]

Apr 30 17 9:46 PM

Uhh, I was exagerating for effect. I can't do a back flip. I meant that a guitar is one place where it's better not to have a locking connector.

When I wanted to tool up for RG58 and BNC I already had a Paladin frame with a couple of dies for BNC's. As it turned out both were for RG59 as best I can tell.  I had only used RG59 before. No RG58 connector and cable combination I found fit the dies I had.  I was trying to figure everything out with manufacturers mechanical drawings. I have payed for my education.

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,568 Member Since:26/01/2011

#25 [url]

May 1 17 8:06 AM

gold wrote:
Uhh, I was exagerating for effect. I can't do a back flip. I meant that a guitar is one place where it's better not to have a locking connector.

 

I did kind of realize that, Paul. ;-) Not that it hasn't occurred to me to try a back flip, but the impulse passes quickly.

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Mike Rivers

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,503 Member Since:13/10/2012

#26 [url]

May 1 17 9:44 AM

When I wanted to tool up for RG58 and BNC I already had a Paladin frame with a couple of dies for BNC's. As it turned out both were for RG59 as best I can tell.  I had only used RG59 before. No RG58 connector and cable combination I found fit the dies I had.  I was trying to figure everything out with manufacturers mechanical drawings. I have payed for my education.


Well, of course they an RG-59 setup won't work with RG-58. The outside diameter of the cable is different and an RG-59 die won't crimp the cable and shield sleeve tightly enough. But you probably know that now. There's no RG-58/59 universal crimp tool unless it's made of plastic and comes from Radio Shack.

You can buy pre-made RG-59 BNC cables. If you only need a few, it's probably going to be cheaper than buying the proper tooling, but if you're like me, you want to have the right tools.



For a good time, call mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,505 Member Since:27/01/2011

#27 [url]

May 1 17 12:25 PM

mikerivers wrote:
Well, of course they an RG-59 setup won't work with RG-58.

 
If only it was that straighforward...Not all RG58 cable has the same O.D. Not all RG59 cable has the same O.D. Each Paladin die has two O.D. crimp sizes. The manufacturers descriptions say things like "for RG58 and RG59". But of course not all RG58 and RG59. Some of the dies are made for and labeled for specific a cable brand model number, of course leaving out whether it's RG58 or 59. Try going to someplace like Marketek and figuring it out. I'd bet dollars to donuts you wouldn't get it right the first time.

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scullyfan

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,589 Member Since:27/07/2011

#30 [url]

May 1 17 7:36 PM

mikerivers wrote:

When I wanted to tool up for RG58 and BNC I already had a Paladin frame with a couple of dies for BNC's. As it turned out both were for RG59 as best I can tell.  I had only used RG59 before. No RG58 connector and cable combination I found fit the dies I had.  I was trying to figure everything out with manufacturers mechanical drawings. I have payed for my education.


Well, of course they an RG-59 setup won't work with RG-58. The outside diameter of the cable is different and an RG-59 die won't crimp the cable and shield sleeve tightly enough. But you probably know that now. There's no RG-58/59 universal crimp tool unless it's made of plastic and comes from Radio Shack.

You can buy pre-made RG-59 BNC cables. If you only need a few, it's probably going to be cheaper than buying the proper tooling, but if you're like me, you want to have the right tools.


​The twist-on BNC connectors for RG58 and RG59 are identical in every regard and interchangable, at least the ones I used to get from Graybar Electric. I acknowledge that there is SOME difference in outside diameter with various versions of RG58, especially "Thin Net" 50 ohm coax. There is a HUGE difference between RG58/59 and RG6, and even a difference between standard RG6 and quad-shield RG6.

I don't use crimp connectors for coax anymore, nor do the cable company techs. I'm using compression fittings now and they are "Super Skookum".

Last Edited By: scullyfan May 1 17 8:01 PM. Edited 2 times.

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Mike Rivers

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,503 Member Since:13/10/2012

#31 [url]

May 2 17 6:26 AM

scullyfan wrote:

I don't use crimp connectors for coax anymore, nor do the cable company techs. I'm using compression fittings now and they are "Super Skookum".


Those are the greatest, and three tools and connector sizes will cover most of the 75 ohm cables used for TV installations. Thing is that TV coax isn't designed for portable use and is usually too stiff to be comfortably used on stage or in the studio.

Unless you're making dozens of cables, though, it's really not all that hard to use the old fashioned "no special tools" connectors with the soldered center pin. One of those two-blade strippers that strip the sheath and shield in one operation is handy, but those aren't very expensive. 



For a good time, call mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,310 Member Since:04/02/2011

#33 [url]

May 7 17 1:26 PM

Cool post!

Of course, a lower resonant peak is "different," not worse.

I purposely use Canare GS-6 cable over the slightly lower-capacitance George L because I like the effect of a little extra cable capacitance for MOST of my guitars. I don't always want it "maximally bright," but usually prefer a sort of 'happy medium' (I also dislike brand new strings).

brad allen williams

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