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trock.lucasmicrophone

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May 13 17 2:43 PM

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I was reading the articel on herman hermits Terry posted, i laughed a bunch of times in it. I kind of like the sarcastic wit, droll humor etc. I was a big fan of Dave Barry back in the day. 

Who do you read that makes you laugh?
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ssltech

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Posts: 4,058 Member Since:22/01/2011

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May 13 17 6:32 PM

Pratchett.

"The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."

Delicious.

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John Eppstein

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Posts: 1,273 Member Since:31/05/2015

#3 [url]

May 13 17 11:02 PM

ssltech wrote:
Pratchett.

"The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."

Delicious.

Damn, you beat me to it.

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tim halligan

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Posts: 1,352 Member Since:04/02/2011

#4 [url]

May 13 17 11:39 PM

Douglas Adams - Hitchhikers' Guide To The Galaxy, Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, The Meaning Of Liff, Last Chance To See...

"...the size of skyscrapers, that hung in the air in exactly the way that bricks don't."

Cheers,
Tim

PS. Spike Milligan was prety good too...

An analogue brain in a digital world

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resolectric

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Posts: 647 Member Since:26/01/2011

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May 14 17 4:48 AM

Erik Satie (excerpt from "Memoirs of an amnesiac")

The Musicians Day

  A n artist must organize his life. Here is the exact timetable of my daily activities: I rise at 7.18; am inspired from 10.23 to 11.47. I lunch at 12.11 and leave the table at 12.14. A healthy ride on horse-back round my domain follows from 1.19 pm to 2.53 pm. Another bout of inspiration from 3.12 to 4.07 pm. From 4.27 to 6.47 pm various occupations (fencing, reflection, immobility, visits, contemplation, dexterity, natation, etc.) Dinner is served at 7.16 and finished at 7.20 pm. From 8.09 to 9.59 pm symphonic readings (out loud). I go to bed regularly at 10.37 pm. Once a week, I wake up with a start at 3.19 (Tuesdays). My only nourishment consists of food that is white: eggs, sugar, grated bones, the fat of dead animals, veal, salt, coco-nuts, chicken cooked in white water, fruit-mould, rice, turnips, camphorised sausages, pastry, cheese (white varieties), cotton salad, and certain kinds of fish (without their skin). I boil my wine and drink it cold mixed with the juice of the Fuschia. I am a hearty eater, but never speak while eating, for fear of strangling. I breathe with care (a little at a time). I very rarely dance. When walking, I clasp my sides, and look steadily behind me. My expression is very serious; when I laugh it is unintentional, and I always apologize most affably. I sleep with only one eye closed, very profoundly. My bed is round, with a hole to put my head through. Once every hour a servant takes my temperature and gives me another. I have subscribed for some time to a fashion magazine. I wear a white cap, white stockings, and a white waistcoat. My doctor has always told me to smoke. Part of his advice runs: 'Smoke away, dear chap; if you don't someone else will.'

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dr funk

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May 14 17 12:52 PM

ssltech wrote:
Pratchett.

"The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."

Delicious.

Yes, Terry Pratchett!

"Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day.  Set him on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life".

The Discworld footnotes were classic.

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chrisj

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Posts: 986 Member Since:22/02/2011

#9 [url]

May 14 17 6:37 PM

"PS. Spike Milligan was prety good too..."

Milligoon! Yes yes yes yes yes yes YES! (You also have to give Peter Sellers and Harry Secombe credit too, Sellers was in fine form and Neddie Seagoon had a voice that sank a thousand ships)

I can't even begin to outline the wonders of the Goons. My chalk would run out :)

Chris Johnson, airwindows.com

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ssltech

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Posts: 4,058 Member Since:22/01/2011

#10 [url]

May 14 17 7:47 PM

I loved Douglas Adams. Listened to the early radio version of 'HitchHiker's Guide...' when it was being written.

I knew I was hooked on Coren when I first read "Bumf".

Wodehouse is sublime, although I doubt he has a wide audience in the US. Fabulous, gentle humor though.

"Made in America" by Bill Bryson is fantastic.

I was RAISED on the Goons; my dad listened to the Goon Show broadcasts religiously; great times fondly remembered. I didn't know until Sellers died in 1980 that Sellers and Seacombe share my birthday. O facy. Sellers was born on my birthday and died on my sister's birthday, so I can never forget the dates. I've copied some of the shows to share with some python-fan colleagues, but haven't yet found one who fully "gets" the goons. -I have however inflicted the goon shows on my teenage son, who now knows the Ying-Tong song by heart!

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barry hufker

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Posts: 12,201 Member Since:26/01/2011

#11 [url]

May 15 17 1:51 AM

Every semester in AUDI 3000 I made my students perform, record, edit, write music for, create original sound effects for, mix, the Goon's "Napoleon's Piano" (mainly) or one of the other excellent Goon scripts.  I spent a while running through the play with them ahead of time to help them with the dated (and British) humor.  They produced theirs without hearing the original version first, as producing the play was also meant to be an exercise in "sound design" when presented with a script.  Once theirs was finished, I would play them the original for comparison.  Theirs was not produced in real time and had to be professional (except for the acting) in all respects.  They seemed to enjoy the experience.

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silvertone

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Posts: 2,775 Member Since:26/01/2011

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May 15 17 5:53 AM

Lorenzo Music was a great comedy writer, Smothers Brothers, Mary Tyler Moore, Rhoda, Bob Newheart Show, etc... I do a lot of move music for his son Sam who works for Warner Chappell. We talk about his dad all the time, he was the voice of Carlton the doorman... which was my nickname in high school. Small world.

Silvertone Mastering, celebrating 28 years in business.

www.silvertonemastering.com

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ktownson

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May 15 17 9:33 AM

+1 on Adams and any version of HHGTTG. Sadly, every piece he wrote was "Chinese Democracy-ish" in that he was such a perfectionist that he wrote and rewrote and rewrote, so his bibliography is slim and he died young.

I quote Adams regularly, as his absurdist viewpoint resonates with government work quite nicely, still incredibly relevant. "Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job."

Another of my favorites: "There is an art, it says, or rather, a knack to flying. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."

His lesser known works, the Dirk Gently novels, were made into a madcap mini-series by Max Landis on BBC America. While not a "real" Adams script, it embraces the spirit of the novels, which are baffling to read at first but snowball into a grand interconnected finale. Season 1 is available for streaming with the BBCA app and Season 2 is expected sometime this year. It's fun viewing, but you have to pay attention. The devil is definitely in the details.

"Kerry fixed the stereo, and now it doesn't work." (My six-year-old sister)

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gtoledo3

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#14 [url]

May 15 17 10:32 AM

Kerry, I dig the Dirk Gently BBC series too.

I've discovered that the original book was based on a script for Dr Who that Adams had written.

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gtoledo3

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#15 [url]

May 15 17 10:35 AM

Since everyone has picked the first obvious choices, I will go a little left field, into the visual.... I ran across a Sergio Aragones / MAD paperback awhile back that I thought had aged quite well.

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chrisj

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Posts: 986 Member Since:22/02/2011

#16 [url]

May 15 17 12:18 PM

Ying tong ying tong ying tong ying tong ying tong iddle-I po,
Ying tong ying tong ying tong ying tong ying tong iddle-I po,
Ying tong ying tong ying…

(stop! It's time to go on to the next post)

Och thank heaven for that, I couldn't remember any more of the words…

Chris Johnson, airwindows.com

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mcallister

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Posts: 777 Member Since:22/01/2011

#18 [url]

May 16 17 11:46 AM

Yes, on Douglas Adams and PG Wodehouse. Lovely stuff.
I've only read a bit of Terry Pratchett, but it made be laugh aloud.

My second favorite literary quotation is from Wodehouse, "A confused noise from within seemed to indicate the emperor had gotten involved with some lamps."

My first favorite is from Gerald Kersh, "I haven't laughed so hard since father died."
Kersh wrote an astonishing number of works, mostly short stories with some sort of twist, but his novel Fowler's End is a comic masterpiece. It's been reprinted and is available. One of my favorite books.

For lyrics, I gotta go with Michael Flanders from the duo Flanders and Swann. Very very British. Some of their albums were produced by George Martin. If you like British comedic sensibilities and, say, Tom Lehrer, then Flanders and Swann may be just your thing. Incredible lyrics and music. Just piano and voices and that's all you need.

F&S are among my favorite songwriters of all time.

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