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mdm

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,736 Member Since:27/01/2011

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May 17 17 10:50 PM

It might have something to do with the DJ/dance/sequencer influence on what is today considered pop music

In the house/dance world, having multiple writers has been normal for a long time. The productions were small budget and everyone involved, from the producer to the engineer sometimes got a share by agreement, just because publishing was a reliable, although minor, source of income.

Anyhow, songwriting in the traditional sense of the word seems to be considered out of fashion, as the 'western' concept of melody and harmony.

Beats are now the focus, apparently.. sound design. Both beats and sound design don't produce royalties

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podgorny

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May 17 17 11:03 PM

There are many reasons for this trend, but the one that this article misses (which IMHO is the biggest reason), is that the bar for "pop" songwriting has been raised significantly, at least in terms of hook-content. Many hit pop songs of yesteryear wouldn't stand a chance against the stuff Max Martin and Sia and others are writing. They've got it down to a science. This isn't to say that modern pop songs are BETTER, unless your only gauge of a song is how quickly it gets stuck in your head.

Kyle Mann :: www.kylemann.com

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,390 Member Since:04/02/2011

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May 18 17 7:36 AM

podgorny wrote:
Also, everyone is part of the songwriting process because it's the only part of record production which still generates a decent amount of money.

This is the answer (I didn't read the linked article yet, so perhaps this was said).

I do a lot of songwriting, but I've also got writing and publishing credit on several songs that I did not write. I've mixed songs in exchange for 10% writing credit before. It's just part of the reality now that other revenue streams are so much less reliable.

brad allen williams

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gtoledo3

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,169 Member Since:23/10/2013

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May 18 17 10:34 AM

podgorny wrote:
There are many reasons for this trend, but the one that this article misses (which IMHO is the biggest reason), is that the bar for "pop" songwriting has been raised significantly, at least in terms of hook-content. Many hit pop songs of yesteryear wouldn't stand a chance against the stuff Max Martin and Sia and others are writing. They've got it down to a science. This isn't to say that modern pop songs are BETTER, unless your only gauge of a song is how quickly it gets stuck in your head.

I know what you're saying, and I agree in a certain context...

But it reminds me of someone I know who works in advertising, who liked to point out that when a commercial catches your attention immediately, it is supposedly succesful, even when it's annoying.

I think that kind of overlooks the possiblity of catching someone's attention quickly, and immediately making a strong negative impression *that causes you to never buy that thing, and maybe even hate it*.
---

It really seems like SOME old artists are equally as catchy though.

Four Seasons come to mind off the top of my head, even if it's obviously a different era presentation. I think just because something wouldn't necessarily be as big a hit today, doesn't mean it isn't as catchy.

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gtoledo3

Aqua Marine

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May 18 17 10:58 AM

The point about catchiness brings to mind another phenomenon...

I can think back on so many times, listening through records and not really being so crazy about a particular song... only to have it wind up being my FAVORITE. Even various "hits". Makes me wonder if gearing everything one way is overall a mistake in trends that has made listening to a whole album less satisfying.

This is all obviously very philosophical, I'm not making any strong assertions here.

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podgorny

Platinum Blonde

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May 18 17 11:08 AM

gtoledo3 wrote:

I can think back on so many times, listening through records and not really being so crazy about a particular song... only to have it wind up being my FAVORITE. Even various "hits". Makes me wonder if gearing everything one way is overall a mistake in trends that has made listening to a whole album less satisfying.

 
I think this is absolutely the case. However, since no one is buying albums anymore, it doesn't pay to create songs which don't get on the radio. I've heard songwriters play down the value of an amazing song THEY WROTE, because it's ballad and (probably) won't generate airplay. Whereas the here-today/gone-tomorrow pop hit will pay the rent and get them more opportunities to keep writing songs for a living.

Kyle Mann :: www.kylemann.com

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mdm

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,736 Member Since:27/01/2011

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May 19 17 10:49 AM

I think today's music is quite forgettable

there's more to pop than repetition and beats.  

They have improved the overall accessibility, sound-wise, through the systematic, computer-based approach, perhaps.  

Records today are mostly 'technically satisfactory' compared to 30 years ago or so... 

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mdm

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,736 Member Since:27/01/2011

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May 21 17 12:20 PM

no, it's just forgettable.. I listen to all kinds of music from all eras, including centuries ago.. some of it is forgettable, other is unforgettable..

today we have largely forgettable music based on beats and production

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mdm

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,736 Member Since:27/01/2011

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May 21 17 12:28 PM

I was told by a pro songwriter that often songwriters get called in after the basic track is down, to improvise on top.. the producer then takes what has been improvised and edits it to fit his vision..

so pop music is not song-based anymore... at least not in the way it used to be.

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