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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,526 Member Since:27/01/2011

#1 [url]

Jul 8 17 11:23 AM

A VMS80/SP79 combo recently was sold to a Japanese customer for a kings ransom. I didn't ask the customer but Sony sounds right.

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dcollins

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,373 Member Since:27/01/2011

#2 [url]

Jul 8 17 1:00 PM

How long does it take a new plant to start producing 'stable' products? Does it work well right off the bat?

 davecollinsmastering.com


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waltzmastering

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,682 Member Since:02/02/2011

#3 [url]

Jul 8 17 1:59 PM

I think they're shooting to be running by around March next year.

Also wondering if they'll be incorporating some of the newer technology that
speeds up the process, cuts down on waste and notches up the quality like, http://www.viryltech.com/
https://www.wired.com/2017/02/warm-tone-record-press-hand-drawn-records/
It seems there's a large proportion of the demand in Japan too.

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,526 Member Since:27/01/2011

#4 [url]

Jul 8 17 7:53 PM

dcollins wrote:
How long does it take a new plant to start producing 'stable' products? Does it work well right off the bat?

It depends on how many old timers are around or they can find. If they have someone who knows the presses and how they like to be set up it will work right off the bat. There are a lot of intertwining systems. Water, steam, hydraulic, pneumatic and electric. When the records suck there needs to be someone who knows how to make them not suck.

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Justin P

Silverado

Posts: 89 Member Since:03/07/2014

#7 [url]

Jul 11 17 7:48 AM

dcollins wrote:
I don't know what goes on at United, but maybe in another 50 years they can get it right.

I found thier pressing work to be pretty decent but whoever they are using to do the cutting work (or farm it out to) often does not do a great job. Despite my attemps to talk clients into using a 3rd party cutting engineer that we know does awesome work, they go ahead and send the project straight to United. Then after hearing the test pressing they understand what I was talking about and have it recut.

I know they are probably busier than ever but they should be more up front to their customers about this. They're a plastic factory, not a cutting house. What doesn't help thier case is that at least up until recently, they were telling their customers to send in the audio on a CD-R and would charage extra if the audio was sent in via FTP, and who knows if they actually cut from the 24-bit files that were uploaded or just had somebody burn a CD-R of that in the office and cut from the CD-R.

 

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,504 Member Since:04/02/2011

#8 [url]

Jul 11 17 7:54 AM

Even as a plastics factory, I've seen some pretty bad things from there.

I had a friend who was doing some 7" records a few years back, asked for my opinion, and then promptly used the one place I recommended they do not use (which was there)--why people do that, I'll never know. Anyway, his records came back and there were problems-- some no-fill, some with visible warps, etc. I think they did make it right eventually.

brad allen williams

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Justin P

Silverado

Posts: 89 Member Since:03/07/2014

#9 [url]

Jul 11 17 8:04 AM

soapfoot wrote:
Even as a plastics factory, I've seen some pretty bad things from there.

I had a friend who was doing some 7" records a few years back, asked for my opinion, and then promptly used the one place I recommended they do not use (which was there)--why people do that, I'll never know. Anyway, his records came back and there were problems-- some no-fill, some with visible warps, etc. I think they did make it right eventually.

Yeah, I defintely never suggest United to my clients. But, if they've already started working out a deal with them and can't be tallked out of it, I at least try to get them to use a good cutting engieeer before sending to United. Sometimes it works, somtimes it takes a bad test pressing for them to get it, and the rest of the time they end up with just an OK sounding record that could have sounded great.

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waltzmastering

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,682 Member Since:02/02/2011

#10 [url]

Jul 11 17 8:44 AM

I don't do a lot of vinyl projects, but had a project from a regular vinyl client go a little sideways last year and have since included a readme doc and tell the plant/cutter to contact me for anything.
I think you run into flakes in any biz, but it can be frustrating knowing everything should have been good to go, and the other end drops the ball.
The one thing I dislike about vinyl is the unpredictability involved once the project leaves your HD, ..even if you align yourself and client with the best possibilities.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,504 Member Since:04/02/2011

#11 [url]

Jul 11 17 8:54 AM

There are SO many ways a vinyl project can go pear-shaped.

That's probably why so few new vinyl releases actually sound any good.

It's possible to do it. You just have total control of selecting all personnel and facilities, and then you have to know how to select the same (keeping up with an ever-shifting landscape... who is doing the best work RIGHT NOW?), and then you have the know-how and equipment to assess the work/QC the test pressings to make sure everyone is working up to their usual standards.

Easy as pie, right?

brad allen williams

Last Edited By: soapfoot Jul 11 17 8:57 AM. Edited 1 time.

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