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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#201 [url]

Apr 16 15 8:41 AM

Painting.
two good lessons learned at this step.... 
If you're in the position of having lots of people offering to help out in a large scale project like this, you need to be smart on who you accept offers from. Certain jobs are perfect for the less skilled help, others, keep all but the qualified away from. Also... there's not many steps in studio construction that you shouldn't think carefully through. When i got to the point of painting, i had suprisingly not given ANY thought to what color the place would be. I was like... "eh... i don't know ... white for the ceiling and off white for the walls... just buy anything and slap it up there.... oh... and let a bunch of my friends help out on painting day. Have you ever painted before? no? doesn't matter. come anyway."
So i have certainy done A LOT of painting before and know what to do and not to do, but in the mental haze i was in after every manner of construction design / permit armwrestling / contractor pindowns.... i chose to forget 2 of the most important points of finishing off a room :

1. pick a color
2. have people who know how to paint paint it.

what ends up happening is at the end of the painting day.. i have what looks like a grandma's sun room from 1992 with splotches and bare patches all over. Hmmm.
i wish i had a picture of it... it was pretty funny. As i was complaining about my color choice (or lack thereof) to a friend, he mentioned picking something that matched some of the outboard gear. That was a nice idea. So i picked 3 different greys and decided to do the end walls in a dark grey, the iso booth a bit lighter, and side walls the lightest grey. This would also match the pine floor and trim i was planning. Turned out better than i expected. Here's an in-progress shot:

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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#202 [url]

Apr 17 15 1:11 PM

After getting the correct paint on the walls / ceiling, it was time to get the clouds built / hung. I had built one a while back... which we ended up moving around constantly during the build which was a lot of fun. Here's some shots of my parents and my daughter helping out. It's funny... i built the first cloud, and my mom and dad decided they wanted to build the next two, which turned out to make mine like a 9th grade woodshop student built it. Dad had the great idea of putting dark trim around the inner boarders to match the end walls. I will say, i never want to buy another bundle of Roxul again. I feel like i've personally kept that company in business for the next decade.
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tb av

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Posts: 1,155 Member Since:24/04/2011

#204 [url]

Apr 19 15 9:18 AM

Wow,,, looks great..

Can I ask you something about those panels. Actually the side wall panels. I want to make a few this summer. It seems like everyone used to use faced 705. Now it seems like everyone just uses unfaced roxul. I've found someone local that actually sells it.. So are you just using 4" unfaced roxul? Is there a specific part number?

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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#205 [url]

Apr 20 15 6:15 AM

Hey - 
The side wall panels were left over from my first studio... they are just 2 or 3" thick 703 panels in pine framing covered in burlap. Simple. 
if I were making more (which i probably will at some point soon) I'd just use 4" R16 Roxul. It's most likely just as effective (moreso if it's 4" thick) since the density of the batt is rather high. 
Worst part about using that stuff is it falls apart the more you handle it. get it in the frame quick, get it covered, and hang it ASAP. Dont leave it in it's opened bundle to be  moved around each day during the build. It gets EVERYWHERE.

-pete

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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#206 [url]

Apr 20 15 6:40 AM

Trim work!
this is where you could spend a small fortune in your build. Buttoning it all up and making it look pretty is where you really start to spend... unless you get on it yourself. We used inexpensive pine for all the trim work here.... except for door thresholds which got hardwood like maple and oak. My dad comes from an outboard boat racing familly here on the east coast ... back in the 50's and 60s they built and raced J-class outboard racing boats... since then he moved on to sailboats, but needless to say he is an expert in almost all mediums... wood, metal, plastics, electrical, engines, plumbing... you name it. Even some electronics. Computers are the only thing that can stump the guy though. 
Pops went to town and did most of the trim work himself... here's a shot of the window detail. the inner and outer wall's gap is hidden by that small strip of wood which is attached at one sill, and floating over the other sill, resting on a strip of foam:
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Here's a job anyone can do that's somewhat hard to mess up... polyeurathane coating all the trim. it seemed like we painted miles of the stuff:
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-pete

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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#208 [url]

Apr 22 15 10:43 AM

Heating / Air Conditioning.

All i can say is this thing is the greatest. 
remote controlled... it'll heat or cool down the room in literally 30 seconds. Point the remote at it... shut it off for a take. Take's over, turn it back on. 
A total no brainer for a studio. Just get one.

image

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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#210 [url]

Apr 22 15 12:21 PM

Terry -
this one's a Fujitsu Halcyon (i think).
It really is the only way to go. One hole to cut in the wall(s)... no footprint... small wall real estate...

-pete

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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#213 [url]

May 4 15 8:00 AM

Flooring!

First up was the subfloor. this was shot directly to the slab (with a vapor barrier under it). My hands were bruised for days after using that Ramset .22 cal nail gun.
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imagei got a tip from a friend who's building a studio a couple towns over on a mill in MA where he got his 8" wide t&g pine flooring... so i decided to jump on it. For less than you'd pay for that cheap engineered plastic junk flooring, i got 800 sq/ft of beautiful wood.
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the sound in the space really starts changing once wood goes on the floor. Changes from that pingy reverb to something with a nice gently decay.
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peteandrews

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Posts: 465 Member Since:26/01/2011

#214 [url]

May 4 15 8:08 AM

more shots of the floor going down. 
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Here's the side entrance, where we are prepping the landing for the correct height under the door for the carpeting that we put down.

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since i was going for a bit of a rough look for the floor (initially thinking of using reclaimed lumber for it... until i saw how expensive it was)... i opted not to sand the thing down (the boards were already pretty well sanded at the mill). All that was left was wipe it down real good and get busy with the polyeurathane. that stuff will give you quite a headache if you don't get some ventilation going. (lesson learned after the first coat). Here's the finished product:

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racks placed in order to double check positioning of everything. this was the nervewracking part... i was hoping it would all fit the way i did the layout on paper (like 2 years ago!).
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