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kb s1

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,593 Member Since: 18/01/2011

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May 17 11 3:26 AM

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I seem to recall there being a few cyclists that have migrated here.

Anyone getting good milage and pace in just now.

Who has bought or borrowed a fancy bicycle recently?


I have borrowed my Dad's spare road bike for a week holiday.
Dave Lloyd, handmade frame in red with Campagnolo Mirage gearset.

On the Isle of Mull and just about to head out for a 13 mile two way cycle with a couple of hours on the beach between directions.
Last week was a 41 mile ride in Perthshire including the fearsome (for me) Schiehallion mountain. I managed about 11mph average. 
Hoping to get that up to 13/14 at least next month.

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,059 Member Since:22/01/2011

#1 [url]

May 17 11 7:50 AM

Well... all that twisty stuff coupled with the ups and downs makes 11MPH quite reasonable indeed, I should imagine, though I must confess that I was a weak rider with inclines, and nervous on downhill runs, so I've little doubt that you'd CRUSH me rather easily! (That wouldn't stop me enjoying myself immensely in the scenery though.)

We took our 8-year old son on his second triathlon this weekend, and his bike s just a (heavy!) mountain bike. -It EASILY weighs more than twice what my full-size bike does. I spend the last couple of weeks out on training rides with him; We've got a lovely route near us which is level, flat, and a dedicated cycle trail. I mapped out a 10-mile circuit with a stopping point at 3 miles out. That allows him to stop and recharge, then attack a measured 2-mile section. I've been pacing & timing him and giving him tips on trying to quicken things up a little, while reminding him about riding safely and trying to keep aware.

So this weekend we threw on the bike rack and the wife & I took him down to Disney for the triathlon event. I spent a good part of the day looking at what the OTHER kids were riding, and -tellingly- where those kids were finishing. I saw that there were thee or four common bikes which were owned by the kids who were obviously putting some effort in, and all of them were 24-inch-wheel road bkes with aluminium frame & carbon forks.

I looked up prices and availability, and found that only two of those makers seem to be still producing the bikes... FELT (Model F24) and Ride Blue (model two-four). Trek USED to make one (Model KDR-1000), but apparently stopped production in 2008.

None of the local bike shops stock them, though they can order them... so I've not been able to 'test-fit' him on a bike and see how he gets along with them, so I started looking online; the 'usual suspects' eBay, Craigslist etc. Nothing on eBay right now, but two recently sold Trek KDR-1000's; in the $400-$450 range.  -Widening the hunt on craigslist Craigslist however, turned up a Trek just north of Tampa.

Tomorrow -as it happens- I'm driving to Tampa anyhow, to help install a new power supply and computer tower over at Morrisound, replacing the ones which were stolen. (I've also offered to spend the rest of the day and donate my services to do whatever else they need; repairing cable ends which were hacked off in the robbery etc.) so I've told the seller that I'll be there.

-So as of right now, I'm pretty excited that I might be able to get him something VASTLY better than what he has. -Also the twist-grip shifting in his bars is a bit like torture, since it's NOT an easy action for small hands... they're so tight that they even give me 'Chinese burns' on my finger & thumb, just working on the bike... so the idea of a better shift arrangement suits me VERY well indeed.

If I had my druthers, I'd love to get the Felt or the Ride Blue, solely because I'm not a great fan of the SORA shifting arrangement (thumb lever inside the brakes as opposed to a second lever behind the brakes) or the Trek's 'bar-rocker' shifters, but for half the price, it's really not that much of a compromise. -I'll see how the bike is before I make a final decision though... sometimes it really is worth spending more to get what you really want.

So the bike rack has stayed on the Audi, and tomorrow our bike stable may have one more member in it.

Do you have anything like "map my ride" for your area? -I presume there must be something like that?  -Round here I know that it's great for ride planning and analysis afterwards, but I'm still getting to grips with my new bike computer.

Currently I'm still loving the Madone 5.9, with full Dura-Ace, and the Node 2 computer which speed, cadence, heart rate, altimeter etc. It also can work with a power sensor, but I'm nowhere near being able to use that sort of data yet! (the sensor's are pretty madly expensive too, so I didn't get that one!) -I still haven't found a saddle which even comes close to the old Avocet which I have moved over from my previous 'beater'... so it's a few more grams, but it just seems to be "right".

This weekend we spent all day at Disney for the triathlon, so I only got to ride on Sunday. I just did the 30-mile trail, and averaged 17.0 MPH. Next Saturday I'm contemplating a group ride with the Seminole Cyclists... Never been on a large group ride before, so I'll just start out in the C-group and take it easy. -I think that I'm probably a fairly comfortable B-group level rider, but I'd much rather take it easy and learn the etiquette, get comfortable with safety etc. before I try and get up to speed.

Trivia: 'Dave Lloyd' was also the name of the guy who sang -among other things- the Cadbury's 'Flake' adverts back in the 1980's, by the way... Dave Lloyd singing, an Bill Mitchell doing the gravelly Voice-Over. -Classic!

...But then the Ad Agency got lazy and used the same soundtrack as the FIRST version for this advert...

Notice how the reverb swells up on the voice for the last ten seconds or so? -That's from where the canoe went under the waterfall and into the cave in the earlier version. -Lazy bastards!

...I know... what can I tell you? -I had no life back then!



-Keith Andrews -If I can't fix it, I can fix it so [i]NOBODY[/i] can fix it!

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arconaut

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,008 Member Since:21/01/2011

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May 17 11 8:51 AM

I'm not a serious bike rider, in that I don't go out on long rides, and I don't have a nice bike, just a beater. (I run for exercise, trying to break a 7.5 minute mile.) But I am a die hard commuter, even dropping off my daughter in the mornings before I go off on my way. We brave the rain, snow, everything. She thinks the rivets and reflector on my rear fender look like a face, so sometimes I hear her talking to her "friend." Below is a photo of my daughter as we prepare to ride off into the snow (what a brutal winter) to school.

My dad is a much more serious rider, he's slowed down at his age, but he still goes out for long rides and has a few nice bikes. He commuted for years on his bike, and my mother's perspective on it was that if he hadn't been a rider, we would've needed a second car. This was her reasoning for buying him a beautiful Eddy Merckx bike for Xmas one year. Dad liked to go to the bike shop to drool on it, so one Xmas we made an excuse for going to the bike shop and of course he volunteered to go along. We walked in and he turned to me, saying, "Hey, you want to see a really nice bike?" When we got to the bike, it had a ribbon on it and it said "Merry Christmas" and boy was he surprised!


Click here to view the attachment

-noah

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kb s1

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,593 Member Since:18/01/2011

#3 [url]

May 17 11 10:49 AM

Keith, sounds like you have some great cycling opportunities available.

I can get the data from our ride in Perthshire. We were out, as a group of brothers I am friends with were prepping for the Caledonia Etape. 82 miles. They (and my Dad) had to wait for me a lot. Getting better though. The quickest brother completed the race in 4hrs 25mins!

The route.

Noah, I know the feeling of not being able to keep up with a keen cycling father. i need to sort that!


Just back from todays ride. Really enjoyed it. Did get a bit concerned on way back when going downhill in the wet for the first time. Not a lot of grip.

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,059 Member Since:22/01/2011

#4 [url]

May 17 11 11:40 AM

Did get a bit concerned on way back when going downhill in the wet for the first time. Not a lot of grip.

-kb_s1

Not to mention that awful feeling when you go to squeeze the brakes onto a wet rim and...  suddenly realise that you don't HAVE the same amount of 'bite'!

The local trail is this one:
http://www.yelp.com/biz/seminole-wekiva-trail-seminole-countyIt's literally a mile from my door to the trail, and the first half-mile is within the gated community, with almost no car traffic, so it's quick and safe to get there.

There are a few pictures from that earlier link here... -Actually, I just noticed that most of them seem to be posted by someone called 'Brian S', who I suspect just might well be the second horn player in my brass band.... Hmmmm -I'll have to ask him. -I know he's an AVID cyclist, doing well in excess of a hundred miles per week.

From the Seminole-Wekiva trail, I can branch off to the Cross-Seimole trail, which adds another 17.5 miles round trip onto the regular beat. Again, it's all nice and flat, smooth and quick, and has a stop at 'Big Tree Park', which has a mountain biking trail which I'd like to try sometime, if I ever find myself with a nice mountain bike. -It's the home of "The Senator", which is the world's tallest 'Bald Cypress' tree.

Every single week, I get to see turtles, friendly horses and cattle, Sandhill Cranes, egrets, herons, the occasional gopher tortoise, and -once in a while- an alligator; sometimes as big as an eight-footer (yikes!) and the scenery is just lovely. -My long-sleeve gear doesn't see much action at all, just a few weeks in the winter.

Sunday's ride was a bit wet because I went out early and the puddles hadn't dried up from the previous night's soaking... but it's a tradeoff between getting wet and getting roasted if you leave it too late, when the sun's heat really starts to bear down later on. -Mercifully most of the trail is shaded, with a lovely canopy of trees providing plenty of shade. -You do have to watch for fallen branches, one of which caught me out this Sunday -again, after Satuday night's rain storm, which had given everything a good shaking and brought down a couple of short branches here & there...

But I tell you what Noah, you command my FULL respect for going out in that white stuff! THAT's dedication!  -When I first got back on the bike last October, I just bought an old beater, and I have to confess that I have become rather attached to it. -When my wife misplaced the computer for the Trek about 3 weeks ago, I went out on the old (early 1980's) thing which I bought last autumn... and I have to say that I thoroughly enjoyed it. -There's just something so wonderfully 'faithful' about an old bike... a sort of an air of 'solid dependability' which newer bikes just don't have... an air which can ONLY be acquired over time! -It's a little like an old guitar: -They're attractive when they're new, then they go through a period of 'not being the latest and greatest any more', but they often quietly mature into something that commands respect.

-Keith Andrews -If I can't fix it, I can fix it so [i]NOBODY[/i] can fix it!

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rodaffleck

Silverado

Posts: 179 Member Since:26/01/2011

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May 17 11 1:39 PM


about 3 weeks ago, I went out on the old (early 1980's) thing which I bought last autumn... and I have to say that I thoroughly enjoyed it. -There's just something so wonderfully 'faithful' about an old bike... a sort of an air of 'solid dependability' which newer bikes just don't have... an air which can ONLY be acquired over time! -It's a little like an old guitar: -They're attractive when they're new, then they go through a period of 'not being the latest and greatest any more', but they often quietly mature into something that commands respect.

-ssltech

It's true. I keep looking at replacing my 25+ year old cro-moly road bike, but it's hard to justify it. I'd never win a race on it, but I cycle for the love of it, not to win against other people. My bike has been the most reliable piece of machinery I've ever owned and I just have a feeling that whatever new and awesome ride I replaced it with wouldn't have the same kind of longevity. That said, I've been lusting over the new Cervelo P2 with the fancy Zipp wheels that my uncle recently picked up for his duathlon races. It's a thing of beauty. In reality I'll likely get something on the level of a Trek 2.1 in a few years; a much more sensible choice for an avid but non-competitive cyclist.

Also, I queried the old prosoundweb a few years ago, but am still on the quest so I'll ask again: what (if anything) do people do to help with wind noise? Even at a modest 20 mph, the wind seems really loud to me and I get ringing after long bike rides. I've tried these: http://www.slipstreamz.com/content.asp?subID=8 ...aaaaand they suck. Normal earplugs help, but most of my cycling is necessarily on fairly busy streets and roads and I'd prefer an option (if there is one) that cuts out the wind but still lets me hear the traffic. Suggestions?

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darin k

Gold Finger

Posts: 904 Member Since:26/01/2011

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May 17 11 2:13 PM

I like the older bikes, too.  I ride an 80's Nishiki Semi Pro, and it's ridiculously heavy by today's standards, but it does weigh less than my spare bike (a 1971 Schwinn Varsity).  I've got mine fitted out more like a city bike (upright style handlebars, full fenders, front basket) since I use it as an everyday rider/commuter, and I've got neck problems that make the "hunched down low" style of riding too painful for me.  There's something about the flex in steel frames that I like - solid but not stiff.  If I had the time for long trail rides I might look into something else, but for now the Nishiki works great.  I've actually been contemplating getting an old steel mountain bike & making it city-friendly (road tires, fenders, baskets) because the streets are getting so bad with potholes & ruts (and my commute includes crossing a couple rail lines), and I keep breaking spokes, even with the old super-sturdy-but-heavy wheels.  I even broke my rear axle a little while back.  I am also working on losing some weight, which I'm sure will help, too.  But given today's budget problems, I don't expect the roads to be getting better anytime soon.

Darin Keatley

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,059 Member Since:22/01/2011

#7 [url]

May 17 11 2:51 PM

I just had a quick hunt online and I found some pictures of someone else's old bike which is exactly like mine:

The front rings are a little unusual -"Biopace", but shimano 105 everywhere, and STEEL baby!

Like an old super-basic Strat. -becomes a part of you pretty quickly!

Update: -A bit of digging shows that it seems to be a 1988 model... Here's the catalog page:

-Keith Andrews -If I can't fix it, I can fix it so [i]NOBODY[/i] can fix it!

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collins

Silverado

Posts: 51 Member Since:15/02/2011

#8 [url]

May 17 11 3:52 PM

Regular roadie guy here.

Specialized Epic Comp (older) but very nice light carbon bike.  Dura-Ace hardware.
Mavic Wheels.  I like Hutchinson Tires.
I try to get out a couple times a week...usually 30 to 50 km...average 20/21kph
thru rolling hills mostly.  Not too bad for a guy with a titanium heart valve...haha.

We've had such crazy windy weather in NC lately, makes it a little more
difficult to keep the speed up, but it's always nice to get out.

Tour of California started this week.  Very nice tour this year with
an Elite riders list.  Hopefully, no dopers.

RIP Wouter Weylandt btw...tragic that. 



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jimlongo

Gold Finger

Posts: 638 Member Since:28/01/2011

#9 [url]

May 17 11 4:00 PM

I commute about 75 to 100 km a week.  Work - Home - Work - Tennis - Home, etc., 
It can be the best part of the day.
I don't do snow or rain, and those days are a real drag.
Currently riding a 10 year old Cannondale hardtail converted mountain bike.  It's pretty light, but of course the lock and basket weigh more than the bike does.  In a couple of years I'm gonna want to be even more upright.

rhythm division - rdiv.com

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berolzheimer

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,877 Member Since:29/01/2011

#10 [url]

May 17 11 5:58 PM

I just bought my almost 16 Y.O son a slightly used Novara mountain bike, at $500 it was about half price & it's pretty sweet.  Dual suspension, disk brakes, nice frame.  Now I have to get one so I can ride trails with him- I've always had road bikes.

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,059 Member Since:22/01/2011

#11 [url]

May 17 11 7:34 PM

Got home this evening and decided to take some pics of my 'stable'.

First the Sirrus:

My current road bike:

The Bike I bought new when I first moved to the states: (Naturally, I bought it as soon as I saw the name "MULTITRACK"!)

Both my Treks together:

By this time tomorrow, my son might have a Trek of his own!

-Keith Andrews -If I can't fix it, I can fix it so [i]NOBODY[/i] can fix it!

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,059 Member Since:22/01/2011

#12 [url]

May 19 11 8:18 AM

Booo... No third Trek just yet I'm afraid...

Got stuck with some computer issues, and it was going dark when I left the studio, so I'll have to make another run to take a look at the kid's Trek bike... Maybe the weekend. -We'll see.

-Keith Andrews -If I can't fix it, I can fix it so [i]NOBODY[/i] can fix it!

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,059 Member Since:22/01/2011

#13 [url]

May 20 11 8:03 AM

I just got a smartphone yesterday.

-I know, I know...  I'm so "last century".

First app which I downloaded to it was iMapMyRide.  -I decided to test it on the drive home, so before I started out, I switched it on and set it to log my drive home. -When I plugged it into the computer at home and went to the site, up popped my journey, and I discovered the 3D 'Flyover' ride replay feature.

Of course it thinks I'm the world's fastest cyclist, because half of the drive was on the interstate, but I was pretty amazed by the ease of use.

Seriously, if anyone interested in cycling has a smartphone but hasn't tried the app, -Try it NOW.

Unfortunately my phone is an android and not an iPhone, so I can't integrate the cadence, speed and heartrate sensors, but at least I can use the onboard computer for that and manually log peak and average data into each ride.

Anyone else using that site? -Or is there another -possibly even better- site/app combo which I don't know about?

-Keith Andrews -If I can't fix it, I can fix it so [i]NOBODY[/i] can fix it!

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demiana

Gold Finger

Posts: 480 Member Since:18/02/2011

#14 [url]

May 20 11 8:22 AM

Another commuter here. About nine miles each way, but no hills to speak of. I'm currently rocking an old Peugeot racer which is on its last legs. Will probably pick up another oldie if it dies -- not convinced that the few pounds in weight I'd save by going for a modern bike is worth the cash and risk of theft.

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,059 Member Since:22/01/2011

#15 [url]

May 20 11 8:54 AM

There's an old black Peugeot which someone parks daily in the bike racks outside the back here...  Don't think for a moment that I don't look appreciatively at it!

And yes, you're dead right. I would never DREAM of leaving my main bike in public racks every day and not worry about it being there when I came back... plus there've been times when I've locked my steel bike up to a communal bike rack and come back to find that someone's knocked it over while retrieving their bike later on, and it's been left there on its side... While a steel bike shakes that sort of abuse off with little more than some paint scratches, a carbon bike can be DESTROYED if any sort of stress is applied, or for example if a second bike falls onto it and a sharp edge hits the frame in just the wrong sort of way.

-Keith Andrews -If I can't fix it, I can fix it so [i]NOBODY[/i] can fix it!

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arconaut

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,008 Member Since:21/01/2011

#16 [url]

May 20 11 8:59 AM

Wow, nine miles, that's a nice ride. My trip is only two miles (but then, I ride to a train station and commute from there, there's no biking from NJ to NYC, no convenient route for me and terrible roads for bikes). I have a pretty evil hill just close to the train station, so at the end of a long day, tired or not, I have to trudge up this hill. Some days are easier than others. We only have, and can afford, one car, so shuttling the kids around with the bike trailer is pretty much a necessity.

Our local police department has occasional auctions of stolen bikes that have been recovered but not claimed by their owners. I wonder if this is a worthwhile way to find an inexpensive commuting bike?

Almost worse than the drivers who disregard bikers, whizzing past me too close as if they don't see me or honking at me presumably to make me aware of their presence, are the drivers who seem to think it courteous to drive slowly behind me. I wish they would just pass me and be on their way. I can't fault the thinking behind it, but it drives me crazy. Do you guys get that? OTOH, a good amount of drivers are nice to me, even stopping to let me make turns or cross a busy road, as if I were a pedestrian in a crosswalk.

-noah

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ktownson

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,223 Member Since:22/01/2011

#17 [url]

May 20 11 10:23 AM

Almost worse than the drivers who disregard bikers, whizzing past me too close as if they don't see me or honking at me presumably to make me aware of their presence, are the drivers who seem to think it courteous to drive slowly behind me. I wish they would just pass me and be on their way. I can't fault the thinking behind it, but it drives me crazy. Do you guys get that? OTOH, a good amount of drivers are nice to me, even stopping to let me make turns or cross a busy road, as if I were a pedestrian in a crosswalk.

-arconaut

I don't know what it is about bike riders in a redneck community, but I have been seriously harrassed while riding down a major highway. The road in question has a great, wide blacktop shoulder that is smooth and unbroken, and other than the occasional bit of gravel, is a nice ride.

Drivers, OTOH, seem to think it's funny to get right behind you and honk, yell unflattering things about your bike pants, spit at you, THROW liquids or even bottles at you (thankfully these morons are physics-challenged enough to be ignorant the bottle is also traveling at their car's speed, so they fail to incorporate any "lead" into their throw--one guy actually hit his own car throwing a plastic bottle at me while traveling in the opposite direction) and generally treat you like dirt.

Louisiana has actually passed a bike-friendly law making it an arrestable crime to throw objects at bikers and cars must pass no closer than three feet when passing. Nice intentions, but I doubt it will get enforced. I've been brushed in the shoulder by outboard mirrors on a cube van. Scary.

We do have a wonderful linear park running across the Parish, no motor vehicles, nicely maintained and policed, smooth as glass. Other than the occasional road crossings, you can get in a 25 mile trip without much hassle. And there's the Abita Brew Pub at one end for some refreshment when it's all done.

"Kerry fixed the stereo, and now it doesn't work." (My six-year-old sister)

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compasspnt

Diamond Forever

Posts: 21,264 Member Since:08/01/2011

#18 [url]

May 20 11 10:41 AM

I used to ride between 60 and 100 miles per day, 5-6 days a week.  (Here in Bahamas, there is NOWHERE to ride properly, so no more.)

Once on a rural road in Mississippi, a bunch of guys on the back of a pickup truck (yeah, go figure) actually threw a watermelon at me.

Again, as mentioned, no awareness of Physics, thankfully.


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sidechain

Gold Finger

Posts: 644 Member Since:03/02/2011

#19 [url]

May 20 11 11:15 AM

Well, in many parts of the deep south, awareness of physics can't really be expected since - to their ancestors - the renaissance was just something that sort of happened to other people.

Portland has spent gazillions of dollars to become one of the most bike-friendly cities in the U.S. and it has worked well and continues to improve.  But STILL you get morons on bikes shooting past you at 30 mph on the effing sidewalk.  Dude, there's a whole lane just for you 6 feet that way.  Do that again, and you'll catch an elbow in the throat.


Devin Knutson Zen Buddhist to hot-dog vendor: "Make me one with everything." www.reverbnation.com/devinknutson

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ktownson

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,223 Member Since:22/01/2011

#20 [url]

May 20 11 12:54 PM

Shortly after my 40th birthday I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes, and set out to lose 50 lbs and get regular exercise. Since my office had been moved about three or four miles down the road here at Stennis, cycling to the cafeteria was a good way to get a little forced exercise.

Unfortunately, the main drag was only two-lane at that time and had about 18" of paved shoulder which had been recently capped, so it dropped off about 4" to large gravel and dirt. There was one stretch where I could not avoid this road, so it was always a frightening ride until I could get off of it.

Most drivers would give you plenty of room and cross over into the other lane as they passed if possible. But there was one day I could hear a large truck approaching from behind. As others have noted, he throttled back and hung just behind my shoulder while I desperately guided my wheels down this narrow ribbon of asphalt, avoiding the bits of gravel and praying I didn't wobble with this behemoth breathing down my neck.

At some point he decided to move on around me, and kindly let me know by blasting his air horn as he accelerated. Damn near lost control of the bike and my bowels, wobbled violently, and in that Alpha brain wave state where time slowed into surrealism, realized that if I was going to put it down, I'd be better off taking my chances with the gravel than a Mack truck pulling a Palmer trailer. I did have a helmet on, so the spill took some skin off elbows and ruined a pair of Dockers, but other than soreness and scrapes, I came out of it in decent shape.

A spectator stopped, another chased the truck driver down, complaints were filed and a few months later that stretch of Trent Lott Parkway had four foot shoulders added. Now it's common to see a peloton rolling down the way during lunch and after work. Thankfully, after 9/11 they stopped letting the gravel trucks use the base as a shortcut around the weigh stations. Politics.

"Kerry fixed the stereo, and now it doesn't work." (My six-year-old sister)

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