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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,572 Member Since:26/01/2011

#1821 [url]

Aug 27 15 8:23 AM

I'm having an issue with my bike - I had a couple of flats and I changed the tube. Now my bike seems to have increased resistance: I'm working too hard on flat ground and uphill, not getting up to speed quickly enough going downhill. It feels like something is rubbing somewhere. When I get off the bike the wheels spin freely and look true, when I get back on the bike I have the increased resistance. What could cause that? I'm assuming it must be something in one of the derailleurs or a bearing or something that isn't engaged when I spin the wheels by hand. My brakes are releasing correctly after I lubricated them. Any ideas?

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,051 Member Since:22/01/2011

#1823 [url]

Aug 28 15 8:07 AM

If it is in the drivetrain (bottom bracket etc) it should manifest itself if you back-spin the crank... (at least my BB failures have)

Do you have an alternative set of wheels to try, even only briefly? Or, can you borrow a trainer stand? Also, try double checking for rubbing brakes by "opening" each caliper (the lever which allows an inflated tire to fit between the rim brake pads) to make sure that the skewers/axles aren't 'shifting' under load and allowing the brakes to rub when the frame is loaded...

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,572 Member Since:26/01/2011

#1824 [url]

Aug 29 15 8:08 AM

I took it to the shop and they told me it is indeed shifting under load - the wheel is slightly out of true, although it looked ok to me, and there was a tiny bit of play in the power tap hub that was causing the wheel to rub against a brake pad when I sat on the bike. I had them do a tuneup as well, so I'm going to pick it up this morning. I'll report back!

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,572 Member Since:26/01/2011

#1825 [url]

Aug 29 15 12:17 PM

It's great, they totally fixed it. On the way there I passed a group ride going in the opposite direction. There was one bunch of 30 or so who must have been five abreast, maybe more. It really bugs me - it's stupid, arrogant stuff like that on roads with narrow shoulders that engenders bad attitudes in drivers. A friend of mine was deliberately run off the road yesterday. He's OK, but he's a drummer and he has a sprained wrist.

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,051 Member Since:22/01/2011

#1826 [url]

Aug 30 15 12:32 PM

seth wrote:
 A friend of mine was deliberately run off the road yesterday. He's OK, but he's a drummer.

How awful.

I know someone who was forced off the road and is now a quadriplegic... But I'm sure even HE is glad that he didn't end up a drummer.

I wonder if there's any hope -any at all- for your friend?

;-)

-Just trying to make light of it. -I'm honestly relieved that it wasn't more serious. GoPro cameras are catching more and more of these drivers nowadays. Perhaps I'll get one when Evan starts doing more road riding among traffic.

The powertap hubs are complicated little beasties. There's one part which HAS to have a CALIBRATED anount of movement under load, and that's the part which the strain gauge "observes", to measure power output. -I understand that they do have to be rebuilt every so often, and maintenance on them is necessarily more complicated than 'regular' hubs.

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berolzheimer

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,871 Member Since:29/01/2011

#1827 [url]

Aug 31 15 1:22 PM

seth wrote:
It's great, they totally fixed it. On the way there I passed a group ride going in the opposite direction. There was one bunch of 30 or so who must have been five abreast, maybe more. It really bugs me - it's stupid, arrogant stuff like that on roads with narrow shoulders that engenders bad attitudes in drivers. A friend of mine was deliberately run off the road yesterday. He's OK, but he's a drummer and he has a sprained wrist.

Cyclists have the right to take the lane.  Drivers need to lose their sense of entitlement.
 

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,572 Member Since:26/01/2011

#1828 [url]

Aug 31 15 9:50 PM

berolzheimer wrote:

seth wrote:
It's great, they totally fixed it. On the way there I passed a group ride going in the opposite direction. There was one bunch of 30 or so who must have been five abreast, maybe more. It really bugs me - it's stupid, arrogant stuff like that on roads with narrow shoulders that engenders bad attitudes in drivers. A friend of mine was deliberately run off the road yesterday. He's OK, but he's a drummer and he has a sprained wrist.

Cyclists have the right to take the lane.  Drivers need to lose their sense of entitlement.
 

That's a right I don't want to stand on in a dispute with a car.

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zakco

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,085 Member Since:02/03/2011

#1829 [url]

Sep 5 15 11:50 PM

I was an obsessed, mountain biking maniac for most of the 90s. For some inexplicable reason, in the summer of 2000 when we built our studio, my bike (a nicely outfitted 1995 Kona Kilauea) went under the building and stayed there for 15 years. Between getting this business off the ground and a few years later becoming a father, I somehow completely buried my cycling habit.

When my daughter started showing some real interest in biking last spring, I bought her a great little mountain bike and I soon realized that she needed someone to ride with regularly if she was going to get better...so...I dragged my old Kona out and much to my surprise, the decay was quite superficial - new tires, grips, cables/housing and voila - my trusty steed was back in business! We spent the next few months riding some really easy trails in our area and (not surprisingly) something interesting happened...it was like a switch went off in my brain when I felt the burn in my atrophied studio legs and the wind on my face. Next thing I knew, I began dragging my ass (and my 20 year old bike) up all of the local mountains and bombing down the singletrack again. What kept going through my head was "how could I have possibly NOT kept doing this?!?"

After a couple of months, I started to realize that some things had changed though. The trails have become much more developed and the terrain much more challenging AND...I had aged quite a bit! A 1 hour rooty, rocky descent on my old hardtail was just pummeling my middle aged body too much, not to mention that when I found myself being flung off the bike (as inevitably happens from time to time...) I just didn't bounce the way I used to or get up quite so quickly...

So...I sold a few guitars that I hadn't played for ever (I'm calling it "thinning out the herd") to finance a nice new full suspension, all mountain Giant Trance 2:

Trance-27-5-2-Black.jpg

I added a dropper post (how did I EVER get by without that?!?) and some beefier, grippier tires. Bought a hydration pack, some elbow/knee armour (did I mention I'm getting old?) and some proper garb and now I'm out riding 4-5 times per week. What a freakin' hoot! I can't believe how amazing the tech has become. Not just the gadgets but the 27.5" wheels, hydraulic disc brakes, sloping top tube, slack head angle etc...these new bikes inspire an amazing level of confidence. I'm riding terrain I simply couldn't have imagined riding on my old rig. Dare I say the golden age of bicycles...?

Anyhow, there's my rambling cycling story. Thanks for listening. smiley: tongue


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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,051 Member Since:22/01/2011

#1831 [url]

Sep 7 15 9:27 AM

Evan was paid an enormous compliment this weekend.

He closed out the Tallahassee youth triathlon series with a win, also finishing up the series in first place.

He came out of swim somewhere in the middle of the pack, and went out on the bike sector with a bit of catching up to do. It was a two-lap distance, and by the time he came in after lap 1 to get his hand stamped and go out onto lap 2, he was just in front of the second-fastest competitor by a second or two.

At the end of the second lap, he was tidily out on front, and my wife -who had been cheering him on- was approached by a woman who asked if he was a member of a cycling club. When my wife told him that he wasn't part of a cycling/racing team the woman asked if he he would be allowed to join their racing club. -I'd already heard from another local resident that there was a cycling team for kids up there who were very keen on developing quick, safe riders, and that they were supposed to be quite good, and it turned out that this was the same team. -The woman said that he would fit right in, and possibly be up there with the the quicker riders!

When we told her that we lived 250 miles away, she was somewhat disappointed, but full of praise for him. -I definitely take that as a nice compliment.

-I have to say, he really is getting to be a really strong and steady rider. This is the view that the other riders had as he set off on lap #2:

image

..And midweek training before the race. (Note the steely look of determination!)

image

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berolzheimer

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,871 Member Since:29/01/2011

#1836 [url]

Sep 11 15 2:50 AM

zakco wrote:
I was an obsessed, mountain biking maniac for most of the 90s. For some
inexplicable reason, in the summer of 2000 when we built our studio, my
bike (a nicely outfitted 1995 Kona Kilauea) went under the building and
stayed there for 15 years. Between getting this business off the ground
and a few years later becoming a father, I somehow completely buried my
cycling habit.

When my daughter started showing some real
interest in biking last spring, I bought her a great little mountain
bike and I soon realized that she needed someone to ride with regularly
if she was going to get better...so...I dragged my old Kona out and much
to my surprise, the decay was quite superficial - new tires, grips,
cables/housing and voila - my trusty steed was back in business! We
spent the next few months riding some really easy trails in our area and
(not surprisingly) something interesting happened...it was like a
switch went off in my brain when I felt the burn in my atrophied studio
legs and the wind on my face. Next thing I knew, I began dragging my ass
(and my 20 year old bike) up all of the local mountains and bombing
down the singletrack again. What kept going through my head was "how
could I have possibly NOT kept doing this?!?"

After a couple of
months, I started to realize that some things had changed though. The
trails have become much more developed and the terrain much more
challenging AND...I had aged quite a bit! A 1 hour rooty, rocky descent
on my old hardtail was just pummeling my middle aged body too much, not
to mention that when I found myself being flung off the bike (as
inevitably happens from time to time...) I just didn't bounce the way I
used to or get up quite so quickly...

So...I sold a few guitars
that I hadn't played for ever (I'm calling it "thinning out the herd")
to finance a nice new full suspension, all mountain Giant Trance 2:

image

I
added a dropper post (how did I EVER get by without that?!?) and some
beefier, grippier tires. Bought a hydration pack, some elbow/knee armour
(did I mention I'm getting old?) and some proper garb and now I'm out
riding 4-5 times per week. What a freakin' hoot! I can't believe how
amazing the tech has become. Not just the gadgets but the 27.5" wheels,
hydraulic disc brakes, sloping top tube, slack head angle etc...these
new bikes inspire an amazing level of confidence. I'm riding terrain I
simply couldn't have imagined riding on my old rig. Dare I say the
golden age of bicycles...?

Anyhow, there's my rambling cycling story. Thanks for listening. image

Awesome!  Welcome back to the trails!  There's nothing like getting a good flow down some nice singletrack.
And yes, the tech has come a long way in the past decade or so.  That bike, BTW, is a close cousin of mine- a 2010 Reign x2.  I bet the 27.5 wheels are nice, though.
What area are you in?

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zakco

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,085 Member Since:02/03/2011

#1837 [url]

Sep 11 15 11:44 AM

Yeah, 27.5 seems to be a solid middle ground and pretty comfortable on any type of terrain. Though for me, coming from 26" wheels, a near horizontal top tube and rigid frame, it's such an extreme transformation in geometry that I can't really say which aspects have made the biggest difference. All I know is this bike climbs like a mountain goat, takes big drops easily and (with my new tires), devours corners with ease. Next spring, I may consider upgrading the Fox 32 to a Rockshox Pike as it seems to be a really effective upgrade on this bike...

I live in the Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island. We have 4 great mountains, all within 15 minutes of my house. One of my favourites, Mt Tzouhalem got featured in this video (about 1:40):

https://vimeo.com/96661922




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