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gullfo

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Posts: 12 Member Since:24/02/2012

#21 [url]

Jul 14 12 7:40 AM

a thinner, lighter floor won't have the LF isolation characteristics that the massive thick concrete floors. they can provide excellent impact isolation which can be helpful and depending on just how light, can provide some mid and HF isolation. 

one compromise, if your structure supports it, is to use a sand filled floor - plywood, framing 24" (600mm) oc 2x4 or 2x6, fill with dry sand and compacted, cover with plywood, then finished floor. this approach is also self-damping. same rules on calculating isolators applies and if your planning on building walls and/or ceiling floated on this, then proper structure has to be incorporated into the floor.

Glenn


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stitch

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Posts: 2 Member Since:12/07/2012

#22 [url]

Jul 16 12 1:21 AM

Awesome tips guys! Really useful stuff!
@sebastian: Hadn't really thought about the impact of the dynamic load. That would short-circuit the entire construction, wouldn't it?
@Gullfo: i'll look into the sandbox floor.

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thomas northward

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Posts: 140 Member Since:10/02/2011

#23 [url]

Jul 24 12 4:05 PM

If you overload your springs, yes, it would short-cut the system in the sense that the natural frequency will start to rise again, and eventually, you'll end up with a rigid system - therefore effectively bypassing.

Excellent posts Sebastian & Gulfo :)

Thomas Jouanjean Northward Acoustics

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osage

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Posts: 21 Member Since:24/02/2012

#24 [url]

Nov 9 12 1:08 PM

Flash!!  File upload not working!   I just tried to post a few questions with a couple of pics. I tried the "Insert Image"...and then the "upload file".  Neither worked. Don't know what the problem is but the forum software leaves a lot to be desired when it comes to posting pics.  When I hit the "submit" button...the whole dang post disappeared. Another 20 minutes of my life...down the drain...sheesh.

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osage

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Posts: 21 Member Since:24/02/2012

#25 [url]

Nov 9 12 1:19 PM

ok, test 2.


Wow...ok, it worked this time. Cool

Ok, hi Thomas. This is Rick...the guy you called in Coos Bay Oregon..USA..remember?

Alright...a few years ago, I posted these Sketchups at the old PSW site, and you answered my questions with some very complicated equations(at least for me) for calculating various things in relationship to floating monitors on a mass..which I really didn't understand at the time. But this seems to be the same principle.  However..my question here is...
  did you use those same equations for floating these rooms...ie....the spring parameters. Also, were these springs custom manufactured to your specifications..or did you simply find a premanufactured product that fit within a range of parameters?  Reason I asked is, I once saw a picture of the massive springs used at Galaxy Studios(Eric Desart), and I believe they were custom manufactured.  If so...I bet they are REALLY expensive...no?  Thanks

Rick



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gullfo

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Posts: 12 Member Since:24/02/2012

#26 [url]

Nov 13 12 3:25 PM

i don't believe the springs were "custom" @ Galaxy as much as "specified" (my remembering of the discussion I had there w/ Eric) for the weight, spacing etc. and the tremendous stress (people) experienced as the rooms were lowered into place, wondering if all those calculations would work in reality...

but the principles are roughly the same in terms of defining the springs (whether or not they are actual metal springs or some other compound) versus mass, air gaps, etc.

Glenn


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osage

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Posts: 21 Member Since:24/02/2012

#27 [url]

Nov 15 12 10:29 AM

Hi Glenn...hey thanks for chiming in.  Ok thanks.  Still wondering what  parameters of the spring are "specified".  This tells me that the GC must be the one who has to find a spring with parameters that fit within a certain "range" of the spec's..no? Either that..or Eric had to find a spring that would work..ie...same thing. Otherwise, if the spec's were so rigid..it would appear that you would have to order "custom" manufactured springs.

The reason I asked is I came across some videos  of spring manufacturing on Youtube.

This one shows making a diy spring, using some kind of manufacturing specification software.

Quite interesting. That's what made me think of this thread.  Weird.   But then I saw one where they were making "custom" springs to client specs.

  Never dawned on me.  Hence the question.  These kind of things aren't seen in the mainstream of things, so I was intrigued by them.  In fact, there are all kinds of manufacturing videos on Youtube, that prior to it's emergence on the net...average people had no idea what goes into manufacturing a lot of materials and products.  That's what I really like about Youtube..not to mention lots of other stuff..like.er..nevermind. Hahaha.

Also, the explanation of why a floating floor must be quite massive to insure the range of live loads is small in comparison so it doesn't compromise the springs ability to do its job, makes sense.  Kinda reminds me of my dads explanation of why the suspension system of older expensive cars felt like a "boat". Same principle..ie...heavy cars made for comfortable riding for women.  The springs had a wide range of compression to work in compared to the live load. Hahahahaha! Not only that..but automatic transmission transition from gear to gear actually were made so there was smooth "slippage" of the clutches..again...for women. Ha! Originally..the shift was abrupt and clunky. Women didn't like it. I read that a long time ago.  Hmm..reminds me of audio compressors too. Hehehehehe

Ok, enough blablabla. 


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toby

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Posts: 2 Member Since:07/08/2012

#28 [url]

Jan 9 13 2:51 AM

Hi

I would like to ask about floating floors as i´m currently building my first more proper room.

From what little i´ve learned it´s quite common that people build floating floors with not enough mass, so it´s not really helping.

My room will be on the second floor of a metal structured building with a concrete slab that can handle 265Kg/m2. I´m building a one room tracking/mixing studio.

I´m planning on 22 mm ruff oak planks or parquet strips. So my question is.

What should i put under it down to the concrete slap?


Thanks! /Toby

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MasonUK

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Posts: 2 Member Since:18/02/2014

#29 [url]

Feb 18 14 7:59 AM

Mason UK Ltd - Acoustic Floating Floor Systems & Vibration Control Products

thomas northward wrote:
Ooops, my bad.In Europe:- Sylomer
- BSW Regufoam
- Products from AMC Mecanocaucho (note: we work with this company) - Akustik + Sylomer
- Vibrabsorber (/+Sylomer)In North America, if I can't work with any of these 3 above that I know well, I will work with - Mason Industries which have very good products, and sometimes with- Kinetics Noise, but to be honest I am not a fan of their KIP / RIM system and I avoid these if possible.
 

Also there is the UK division of Mason Industries Inc. Who also sell to Europe and the Middle East. Great website with details on products for all types of vibration & noise control and acoustic isolation as well as typical uses on the applications pages (box in box construction diagrams). Acoustic floating floor systems are a popular product. www.mason-uk.co.uk

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