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berolzheimer

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,876 Member Since:29/01/2011

#21 [url]

Jan 25 12 12:58 AM



nice Paul.
what kind of plugs are you folks using? fitted ones? how much of a db drop?

-organica

I carry er-15's & foam plugs, use the er-15's when I still need to hear what's going on around me, the foam ones when I don't or things are especially loud.

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LeforaGuest

New Forum Friend

Posts: 0 Member Since:29/06/2017

#23 [url]

Jan 25 12 10:36 AM

At least that annoying pedal squeak in "Since I've Been Loving you" is gone.

-jetbase

Ha. I like to play that for some of the youngsters now and then, mostly when we start talking about how perfectly sanitized things have become, and it's sadly shocking how many of those "20 somethings" can't hear it.



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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,960 Member Since:20/01/2011

#25 [url]

Jan 25 12 12:46 PM

the early echo-vocal on Whole Lot Of Love is a ref vocal leaking through the pickup of the slide guitar...
i wonder how many bedroom producers would use it, rather than 'fix' it by muting it in the end.




thus endeth the tangent

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mgod

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,801 Member Since:21/01/2011

#28 [url]

Jan 25 12 3:00 PM

Its true! I used to have lots of noisy sex!

Hey Bill, do I remember right that you had found some treatments, maybe herbal ones, that were alleged to help with tinnitus?

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#31 [url]

Jan 25 12 5:17 PM

Hi guys,

The inner ear uses more oxygen per pound than any other organ of the body besides the brain. So proper oxygenation is key to healthy hearing. Because the capillaries are so small, any change in vasodilation or vasoconstriction will affect them first and your hearing will suffer or benefit as a result of inner ear cell function.

So keeping your blood vessels healthy so they can dilate when needed is important. To that end, I take 240 mg of Ginko Biloba each day, and I must say, it has been the most consistent positive influence on my hearing. Ty Ford turned me on to it around 1990 and I have used it ever since. I also have taken the NAC because the Army has been using it after weapons training to minimize tinnitus. I have had some success with it, but I can really tell when I run out of Ginko.

I also take Slo Niacin for a few reasons. First it actively dilates blood vessels for a period of time. This niacin "flush" can be uncomfortable (I have told my Barry Manilow story here) and so I take the time release version. I understand it is good for the heart and reduces cholesterol in the bargain, another thing that is good for capillary action.

I wear ear plugs ALL the time. I swear, I have them in constantly. Right now in fact. Of course my sons band is rehearsing upstairs but they are not loud or obnoxious, I just wear the plugs.

I have discovered an interesting thing. Thomas Jouanjean wrote a brilliant post on his forum about his acoustic design philosophy and by happenstance it included a really important element in the control of tinnitus as part of our basic neurological function of hearing.  He described how the brain searches out sound as part of it's orientation process. This is a function of something called the visual/auditory/vestibular triad, that occurs in the brain and allows us to know where we are in space. I deal with this all the time with autistic children and I recognized his revelation immediately.

Anyway, when we wear earplugs or inhabit very quiet environments, our auditory cortex, "reaches out" to sample sound reflecting from the walls so that we can balance and maintain something called proprioception (our awareness of ourselves in space). The quiet space or earplugs actually cause the brain to add more "gain" and therefor tinnitus becomes more apparent.

What I'm getting at, is that if your ears are ringing, many times the solution can be to go listen to some music! I'm not talking about the ringing from drinking eight cups of coffee, six beers and listening to heavy metal for three hours, but the ringing that you get when you are going to bed and all is quiet. You don't have to listen loud either. Just put on some relaxing music and a pair of headphones at a medium volume. Try it sometime.

Bill

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iris

Gold Finger

Posts: 798 Member Since:17/01/2012

#32 [url]

Jan 25 12 5:27 PM

The hippie world contains a supposed ear remedy involving waxed tubes (ear candles) where one end is lit on fire... the other goes in the ear. It's supposed to pull out stuck wax, or 'open the tubes". I've tried it... nothing happened I could notice (except for lighting my Hendrix style afro on fire!)
I have had someone show me the gunk that supposedly came out...
One friend who does it for others swears she restored the hearing to an old man who was half deaf.
Jury's out on this one. However...  as someone prone to wax build up, I've seen an ear pro, who uses both water and vacuum suction... and I must say... "getting the wax out" is a HUGE thing.
My first time... a blob had sealed one ear shut. Nothing but dull muffle for DAYS.
When the doc hosed it out... a massive blob... and then did the other ear...
I could hear the whisper rustling of his doc smock. It was SO LOUD it was almost supernatural.
If you've never been de-waxed by a specialist (BE CAREFUL WHO YOU CHOOSE...  it's your ears man! and try and get some references. Highly recommended.

Ummm... I ADORE the pedal squeak on "loving you... that performance/recording in every way...  is truly one of the greats.
And I ALWAYS thought the pre-echo on Whole lotta love, was from not storing the tape tails out! I was convinced it was print through. Thanks WW... I feel both cooler AND smarter knowing that.

Will somebody start a new thread on your "FAVE extraneous noises" in a famous recording?
That hopefully we can ALL hear?

Phoenix Eyeris Nijisan Recording Phase One... in which Doris gets her oats! www.phoenixeyeris.com "Pictcha the finga's going 'chucka chucka'..."

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strangeandbouncy

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,150 Member Since:02/02/2011

#34 [url]

Jan 25 12 5:52 PM

Totally agree with you there, Terry! My wife is Russian, and they swear by them. I was bullied into trying it, and regretted it for months. I ended up with a spate of infections that seriously screwed me up for ages.

  stupid . . . .

Ruh Roh . . . . .

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chance

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,686 Member Since:30/01/2011

#36 [url]

Jan 25 12 6:50 PM


Well, (ugh) I'll be 69 in June and spent 20+ years playing bass in a horn band with an SVT with 2 8X10 cabinets behind me. I have noticed that while mixing I tend to want to crank up the gain as the hours go by and have learned to mix (at first) at an "extremely" low level when all the oddities really pop out. I use a db meter and try to stay between 75 and 85 db when mixing at normal levels.
I also use a spectrum analyzer to see what I am (or supposed to be) hearing across the different frequencies. As in flying, I need to put a lot of trust in instruments. In the photo, you can see the spectrum analyzer right above the L & R out meters on the board. 
I mentioned this before, but cats hearing blows me away. My cat can be on the couch, and the speakers are up around 85db and I'll just rub my thumb and 1rst finger together, and you can see the cats ears hone in on my two fingers. I'll raise my hands up and do the 2 finger thing, and again the cats ears hone in to the direction of that quiet sound of my fingers when there is 85db of sound coming out of the speakers. If you have a cat, try it.
In the photo you can see how hot the lows and lower midrange frequencies are


Click here to view the attachment

Chance Pataki The Musicians Workshop www.the-musicians-workshop.com musicians.workshop@gte.net

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mdm

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,739 Member Since:27/01/2011

#37 [url]

Jan 26 12 7:48 AM

Bill,

this brain-process you describe which helps one get their bearings in an environment is interesting to me because I have observed that when I wear headphones (and these days I avoid them if possible), even at low volume my tinnitus increases right after.

I have quite significant tinnitus since 2005, when after standing by a large diesel engine one morning it appeared.. it seems to be triggered-off by low frequencies as well, like a sort of distortion..

anyhow, I notice that the unnatural 'headphone' environment, especially mono signal sources cause an increase in ringing and sometimes a low fluttering noise.

I have intuitively thought that the brain was looking for something to hold-on to, like room reflections, and that since in headphones these do not exist it goes into a state of nervous stress.. or something.

I notice that the sound of a shower (water), seems to relax my hearing senses, and of course stress will cause the noise to increase dramatically.

it's almost like when you have a sore back or muscle and you really feel it when you are using those particular muscles more than usual.

I believe that mine could be a TMJ issue as well, BTW..


as far as the original post, I have less problems evaluating audio now than 20 years ago, although I enjoy it less, aurally speaking... I do tend to focus more on performance now, like I did when I was very young so in the end musically it's not so much of a problem... my tastes in audio equipment usually push the envelope for better 'performance-reproduction' and not sound-reproduction per se..


but once in a studio a young engineer heard an oscillation at 16-20 KHz which I didn't even know was there! so I guess you do need young ears in the studio to check for noises etc..

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#38 [url]

Jan 26 12 8:49 AM

Max,
I have found many of the same things that you have. Good post. Worth reading for those of use with some miles on the tires. It's good to know that there are simple things a person can do (taking a shower reduces my tinnitus too) to make their life more enjoyable.

Bill

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barkleymckay

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,340 Member Since:22/01/2011

#39 [url]

Jan 26 12 9:10 AM

The shower may be a little like white noise?
I know many who have tinnitus who find leaving the radio on at night - tuned between stations - helps them get to sleep.

barks

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iris

Gold Finger

Posts: 798 Member Since:17/01/2012

#40 [url]

Jan 26 12 3:40 PM

I am giving thanks to providence... that I cut my rock band/steady gigs days short! No tinnitus... which sounds like a major drag to have. Moved to solo acoustic by 1987...So I'm gonna blame Ted Nugent for what damage I DO have. I saw  a big show of his in Seattle around 1980... he swung onto stage on a rope in a loin cloth like Tarzan... and something pissed him off during the show.
He leaned his Birdland against his stack at full volume, and stalked off stage.
The FEEDBACK was piercingly painful. It hurt. It was like a star trek episode where sound waves make everybody hit the floor and flop around like frying fish.. It hurt for 20 minutes until he came back on stage and started to play again. The rest of the concert sounded like I had earplugs in... and my ears did not stop ringing for 3 frickin' days!

Dear Mr. Nugent... I think yer an ass!

Phoenix Eyeris Nijisan Recording Phase One... in which Doris gets her oats! www.phoenixeyeris.com "Pictcha the finga's going 'chucka chucka'..."

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