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iris

Gold Finger

Posts: 798 Member Since:17/01/2012

#43 [url]

Jan 26 12 7:59 PM

A true Artiste like that will only perform when conditions are right.

-compasspnt


I actually love ol' Ted. I read an article he wrote once where he mentioned his 'million candle power' floodlights on the top of his jeep. He said, "if someone's got their bright's on, I will give 'em a polite flick of my regular brights. If they don't turn 'em off after that... I hit the flood rack... and they for sure will then drive into the ditch".
Also... "i love to go to church, because farts really resonate off the wooden pews, and people can't get away."
Not too mention some of his solo's! Stranglehold to this day is still one of the best ever recorded.
Hey... who recorded Ted?

Phoenix Eyeris Nijisan Recording Phase One... in which Doris gets her oats! www.phoenixeyeris.com "Pictcha the finga's going 'chucka chucka'..."

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,960 Member Since:20/01/2011

#45 [url]

Jan 26 12 11:46 PM

I actually love ol' Ted. I read an article he wrote once where he mentioned his 'million candle power' floodlights on the top of his jeep. He said, "if someone's got their bright's on, I will give 'em a polite flick of my regular brights. If they don't turn 'em off after that... I hit the flood rack... and they for sure will then drive into the ditch".Also... "i love to go to church, because farts really resonate off the wooden pews, and people can't get away."

-iris

bright, classy, and a major talent

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iris

Gold Finger

Posts: 798 Member Since:17/01/2012

#46 [url]

Feb 5 12 3:02 AM


bright, classy, and a major talent

-weedywet


lol... that's clever WW

Phoenix Eyeris Nijisan Recording Phase One... in which Doris gets her oats! www.phoenixeyeris.com "Pictcha the finga's going 'chucka chucka'..."

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dr funk

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,636 Member Since:24/12/2011

#47 [url]

Feb 5 12 4:53 PM

Great thread, and a very timely read for me.  I had an unfortunate headphone experience back in May 2008, which left me with some midrange loss and distortion in my left ear, and a pitch discrepancy between my left and right ears.  I received steroid treatment which restored some, but not all, of the affected midrange.  Unfortunately it didn't correct the pitch discrepancy.

In November 2008, after extensive internet research, I found out about the work of Dr Lutz Wilden in his laser therapy clinic in Bavaria, Germany. He claimed to be able to restore damaged hearing by feeding low level laser energy to the inner ear. The idea was that the hearing cells would actually respond to the laser, and begin regenerating and eventually recovering. Naturally, I was extremely sceptical, and I read both positive and negative opinions about the therapy. So I took a chance, booked a trip to Bavaria in December and went for 10 days of laser therapy, 1 hour per day. My first impression of him was that he spoke a lot of common sense, and seemed to know a hell of a lot more about the inner ear than the ENT consultants here in Ireland! He was aghast at the thought of intensive steroid 'therapy' for hearing loss (even though they had worked to some extent) due to the damage they also cause (thinning of membranes). He was even more aghast at the fact that hearing aids are so widely prescribed, when they are in fact compounding the hearing loss in the long term by blasting the ears with even more volume, when it was excessive volume that had cause the loss in the first place.So, I began the treatment with great enthusiasm, but by the end of the first week, I hadn't noticed any improvement.

Then on the Wednesday of the following week, I went for lunch in my usual quiet cafe, and while I was reading my book, suddenly noticed that I could hear a conversation 4 tables away! It had crept up on me so gradually that I hadn't realised that I had in fact been improving all the time! The crunch came when I arrived home that Friday night, powered up the gear and played a song. It was in tune! And it wasn't distorted either... And I was back in business! 2009 was the year I got back to work properly (both in studio and as a gigging musician), and later that year mixed an album which turned out to be my finest work to date, and received many positive reviews, with reviewers praising the production and sonics of the record!

If anyone is interested in reading about laser therapy for the inner ear, this is Dr Wilden's website. And here are a couple of direct links to pdf documents about the inner ear and the effect of laser on the inner ear.

Frank

Last Edited By: dr funk Jan 4 14 3:35 PM. Edited 1 time.

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#48 [url]

Feb 5 12 5:18 PM

Frank,

What a fascinating post. I"m so glad you felt comfortable enough here to post it. Lots and lots of pro engineers are working with limited hearing. I knew a commercial radio engineer who was completely deaf in one ear and he did great work.

I for one will check out Dr. Wilden's site.

Bill

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wireline

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,123 Member Since:24/01/2011

#50 [url]

Jul 11 12 7:16 AM

I'd like to revisit this for a while, as some interesting things have started to (re)surface in this department...

That being not so much hearing loss, but word intelligibility,and discrimination.

First, words.  For years, many people thought I was going deaf because they thought I could not hear words.  I tried explaining over and over (and over) that I heard the words, I just had a hard time understanding them - this has been almost completely resolved in the new, acoustically correct control room (obviously), but I don't spend every moment there...what causes this, in which I hear everything being said, but fail to assemble the dithongs and such into meaningful data?  Everything else comes thru just right.  I can hear a gnat fart from 20 ft in a crowded room, but often I don't understand the words of the waiter at the restaurant.

The next thing, most people don't seem to believe until I prove it to them - we all know what compression is, but somehow, in natural settings, my brain detects very low sources and boosts them to roughly the same level as things right next to me.  (Strange, ain't it...)  This is VERY distracting, for example, when I'm talking to someone, a plane flies overhead, and my brain boosts the plane noise to the same volume or louder as the speaker, drowning them out...Worse is when I'm in sweatlodge, and a dog barks 1/2 mile away, or similar low background noise becomes as loud as the person speaking...

Help?  Thoughts?  This really is problematic enough to bring it up on a public forum.  I hear well enough to do what I do - its the distractions of word discrimination, and noise nondiscrimination that is frustrating.

Ken Morgan

Please...Give It A Rest

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compasspnt

Diamond Forever

Posts: 21,223 Member Since:08/01/2011

#51 [url]

Jul 11 12 7:59 AM

I don't know enough to make any good statements on the causation, but I do wonder if this is a big reason you enjoy working on music in a control room so much.

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#52 [url]

Jul 11 12 8:18 AM

Ken,

I have been working on behalf of individuals who exhibit auditory hypersensitivity and central auditory processing disorder since the middle 90's. It is estimated that as many as 20% of the population have these conditions to some degree. And yes, it seems like a conundrum but many people with these conditions also have high auditory intelligence.

I suggest you research CAPD and take a look at www.easecd.com.I think you will find a myriad of similarities to your circumstances and even some solutions.

Bill

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,960 Member Since:20/01/2011

#53 [url]

Jul 11 12 1:59 PM

Audiologists also talk about "discrimination"; and use that term.

there is a phenomenon associated with hearing loss in which the ability to discern the 'desired' sound (speech, specifically) over the background noise becomes more difficult.
this is utterly common, and you will see that people with noticeable hearing loss struggle to hear clearly much more in 'noisy' environments.

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LeforaGuest

New Forum Friend

Posts: 0 Member Since:29/06/2017

#54 [url]

Jul 11 12 2:22 PM

Ken,
I have been working on behalf of individuals who exhibit auditory hypersensitivity and central auditory processing disorder since the middle 90's. It is estimated that as many as 20% of the population have these conditions to some degree. And yes, it seems like a conundrum but many people with these conditions also have high auditory intelligence.
I suggest you research CAPD and take a look at [url] think you will find a myriad of similarities to your circumstances and even some solutions.
Bill

-bill_mueller

Bill, over the years, I've learned a lot from you about the mechanics of this stuff. Thanks for that. But one thing that I keep forgetting to ask: As personal as it is, what do audiologists and their GP brethren recommend for cleaning the ear canal? Do you have it done professionally? Sometimes I have a 800-ish dip in my left ear, sometimes I don't.

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#55 [url]

Jul 11 12 2:46 PM

Audiologists also talk about "discrimination"; and use that term.
there is a phenomenon associated with hearing loss in which the ability to discern the 'desired' sound (speech, specifically) over the background noise becomes more difficult.
this is utterly common, and you will see that people with noticeable hearing loss struggle to hear clearly much more in 'noisy' environments.

-weedywet


Ken,

William is correct to bring up discrimination in the discussion, even though I don't believe it is what you described. Discrimination is the natural loss of dynamic range between the threshold of hearing (at any given frequency) and the threshold of pain as we age and loose our youthful abilities.

So if you were experiencing discrimination, you would not be able to understand people talking a room away (for instance) but sounds of even a medium volume (85 decibels for instance) would cause you pain. You did describe the loss of threshold properly, but the hypersensitivity you described did not include pain.

The term to describe this pain is hyperacusis. This should not be confused with auditory hypersensitivity though. Auditory hypersensitivity describes the ability to hear noises that others cannot yet hear (a plane or train approaching from far away), or the inability to block out environmental sounds like the refrigerator or air conditioner.

Hyperacusis describes a low threshold of pain to any sounds. Also, hyperacusis is typically associated with general hearing loss and tinnitus, while auditory hypersensitivity is not associated with hearing loss or tinnitus.

Bill

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#56 [url]

Jul 11 12 2:49 PM


Bill, over the years, I've learned a lot from you about the mechanics of this stuff. Thanks for that. But one thing that I keep forgetting to ask: As personal as it is, what do audiologists and their GP brethren recommend for cleaning the ear canal? Do you have it done professionally? Sometimes I have a 800-ish dip in my left ear, sometimes I don't.

-phantom309

David,

I have always been told not to put cotton swabs in my or my children's ears. There are however ear washes that seem OK.  Every time I go to the audiologist I get told my ears are hyper clean, a result of my constant ear plug usage. And my ears change all through the day too. I'm hyper-vigilant to it too. Our burden.

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wireline

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,123 Member Since:24/01/2011

#57 [url]

Jul 11 12 4:00 PM

I admit to hearing loss, just as any honest man would (not many around, who ar over 55, fired weapons for too many years, and still play live)...

But as pointed out, pain free hearing mush is annoying...at lunch today with my employer and a Nashville wiring/construction consultant, I had to really focus on the words being said to zero in over the sounds of the HVAC, the conversations at adjacent tables (all of which were as loud as ours), traffic in the street, whatever...

Ken Morgan

Please...Give It A Rest

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,960 Member Since:20/01/2011

#58 [url]

Jul 11 12 7:09 PM

So if you were experiencing discrimination, you would not be able to understand people talking a room away (for instance) but sounds of even a medium volume (85 decibels for instance) would cause you pain. You did describe the loss of threshold properly, but the hypersensitivity you described did not include pain.

-bill_mueller

also referred to by Audiologists as "recruitment"

it's not at all unusual to experience discrimination problems way before low level or mid level sounds cause pain.
you may, however, find that loud sounds 'hurt' you sooner than other people

generally it's recommended to NOT clean your ears;
nature makes them mostly self-cleaning.

if wax becomes a problem, a professional should do it.

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hank alrich

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,755 Member Since:28/01/2011

#60 [url]

Jul 12 12 10:35 AM

I think I may have lost some of my hearing, but I can't remember where I left it.

hank alrich
http://hankandshaidrimusic.com/
http://www.youtube.com/walkinaymusic

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