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kingfish

Gold Finger

Posts: 660 Member Since:26/01/2011

#101 [url]

Aug 17 12 12:26 PM




Every time I go to the audiologist I get told my ears are hyper clean, a result of my constant ear plug usage.

-bill_mueller

Bill, I too wear Earplugs all the time... I have the little orange foamies in my computer bag, all suitcases, glove box of car, pockets... if I'm subjected to any loud environments, I pop them in, and I sleep every night with ear plugs.

You say your ears are hyper clean, from usage of the ear plugs... I find that once in a while, when I remove the ear plug, it's pushed / compressed wax further into my ear, creating a bit of a plugged ear. At one point it was so bad for a day or two, I went and got a water syringe, and cleaned my own ears out, and it was ok.

Does anyone use ear drops on a regular basis?

I've got a myriad of problems I'm concerned about as I age (And it's all flyin by pretty fast!) 

I have "Medium" Tinnitus, Since I've moved into the new Mix Room at Addicion, it's SO Effin quiet in here, seriously, I can Hear my hearing loss"  it's not suffocated in here, it's actually quite open, and very even sounding.. best mixing / working environment I've ever worked in to listen to sounds.. but when I hit STOP, and I'm working by myself, the "sound of the Air particles in the room" sound filtered, and there's my tinnitus. 

I was actually relieved when I swapped power amps on my NS-10M's and hooked it up under the console, in the room (Old amp was in the Machine closet) onve it was working, I decided to build a little rack under the console, and leave it in here... it's quiet, but just a little bit of noise I feel like I need in the room, to not be "Shocked by the silence"

Our Cutting floor is really THAT quiet as well, it's pretty amazing.

I also have a sinus problem that concerns me for my hearing. I've been clean and sober for 15 years, so I'm not embarrassed to say I had a pretty active cocaine habit for a decade, which destroyed alot of my sinuses.

If I exhale hard, out my nose, I can hear the rumblings of wind (Like someone blowing in your ear, but from inside your head) CREEPY :) but I wonder, as this progresses, and as I age / deteriorate (Which is inevitably more rapid at this point) what problems / Damage could happen from this.

As far as "Typical hearing loss" - I'm so hyper sensitive to 3k ish frequencies I'm always notching chick vocals, and sometimes entire 2 mixes around 3.2k - so, as long as I'm doing that out of necessity to please me in a mix, I'm probably still ok for the "Noise generated hearing loss"

Is there a hearing test program / Wav we can download, and test our own hearing with? or some parameters we can use to devise our own test, such as playing a 1k tone at 70db and sweeping it up till we can't hear it anymore etc... 

When I do this, through my DynAudios I can hear up to 15837Hz it's very faint, but detectable to me. anything above that, my DB meter on my iPhone still bounces up to 70DB so i know my speakers are producing the signal.  My speakers / room keep within a DB up to 18051Hz then drop off 10db or so to --> 20db between there and 20k

David

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#102 [url]

Aug 17 12 1:07 PM

David,

I wear MaxLite ear plugs. They have a smooth skin and don't irritate your ears, which could actually cause you to create more wax as a protective measure. They are also pretty cheap and I don't mind leaving them like a trail of bread crumbs wherever I go.

Here is a link to a pretty cool online hearing test! Keep in mind that the headphones you use are extremely important. If you go to www.headphones.com you can look up the frequency response to many popular headphones. The Sony 7506 and MDR V6 headphones, even though everyone thinks they are so bright, are actually quite flat.

http://www.digital-recordings.com/hearing-test/www-ht-pro/ht_help_p.html

I don't have that "problem" with my control room, ha, ha! Count your blessings brother. Thomas had a great post last year about how the ear/brain mechanism actually cranks up the gain in low noise conditions to try and hear as far into the space as possible. That syncs perfectly with what I have learned about the ear/brain structure too. For that reason, quiet environments can actually aggravate our tinnitus. The take away is to not freak out if your ears ring in ultra quiet environments. Your brain is doing its thing. I like to put on a pair of headphones in the morning and give a listen at medium volume to a song with a nice wide frequency response to "calibrate" my tinnitus. It really works. You will notice less after doing so.

I have no idea what is bouncing around in your sinus cavity. Could be your brains falling out. But it's probably something like a deviated septum. I have a deviated septum from having my nose broken over a girl, (long story) when I was 15. I have always had to deal with sinusitis and such. I use Allergy Buster and it works really well to keep my head clear. Not my brain, just my sinuses.

It sounds to me (pun) like your hearing is still pretty damn good, so I would not worry much about the 3Khz thing, however I would make sure that your monitors are not peaking there.

I hope this was helpful!

Bill


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kingfish

Gold Finger

Posts: 660 Member Since:26/01/2011

#103 [url]

Aug 18 12 1:16 PM

Thanks   for all that Bill... definitely look into bunch of that stuff, like the plugs.

Great Hearing test link - I did the test, on a few different sets of headphones... surprisingly, my hearing is actually pretty even, other then being completely deaf above 16k which is interesting that I confirmed that sweeping the signal generator in pro tools up that high before your test.

I also, out of safety, and curiosity, blasted some impulse responses through the Dyn's at Mix position, and my monitoring path is surprisingly flat, (With no resonances or boosts in the 3k range) which I was curious about after our conversation.

I really imagined the coloration of the Trident desk, wiring harness / cabling to be less flat then it is... I also imagined I was likely WAY more hearing degraded then I am before I did these hearing tests, cause my Tinnitus makes me "Feel" deafer then I really am.

Nevertheless, I can begin mixing this record with less paranoia then usual.. for now :) till the next one... hope that hearing test stays up online for a while... I'm going to perform hearing tests on all my classic rocker clients... and SEE how deaf they really are ;)

And now, when I'm annoyed by my teenage - to  - 20 year old clients, I can play a 17kHz tone at 90db in the studio on a regular basis when they are annoying me, so I get to work in peace :)

David

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loji

Silverado

Posts: 124 Member Since:12/04/2011

#105 [url]

Aug 23 12 9:03 PM

Hi guys,
The inner ear uses more oxygen per pound than any other organ of the body besides the brain. So proper oxygenation is key to healthy hearing. Because the capillaries are so small, any change in vasodilation or vasoconstriction will affect them first and your hearing will suffer or benefit as a result of inner ear cell function. 

-bill_mueller




Ah ha!  This is why coffee in the mornings sounds soo good ;) 




Thomas Jouanjean wrote a brilliant post on his forum about his acoustic design philosophy and by happenstance it included a really important element in the control of tinnitus as part of our basic neurological function of hearing.  He described how the brain searches out sound as part of it's orientation process. This is a function of something called the visual/auditory/vestibular triad, that occurs in the brain and allows us to know where we are in space. I deal with this all the time with autistic children and I recognized his revelation immediately.

-bill_mueller


    I wonder if listening into a seashell would balance this. A kind of white-noise that can be carried in your pocket. (and is very zen and calming)



Or if our proprioception would freak out, and the 'ear-room' would mismatch our visuals cues .. what would a brain do? 




(thanks for teaching me a new word today Bill ) .. or a few :)

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faganking

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,930 Member Since:20/01/2011

#108 [url]

Aug 24 12 10:10 AM

I have been wearing ear plugs at night since 1989. I also wear them in the subway and on airplanes.

Maybe two or three times a year (at most) I begin feeling a slight pain. I lay on my side, pour a small amount of hydrogen peroxide in my ear, put a small cotton ball in and listen to bubbles a churnin'. Rinse and Boom....all better.

Benjy King www.benjyking.com

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strangeandbouncy

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 2,150 Member Since:02/02/2011

#109 [url]

Aug 24 12 10:25 AM

plugs on planes is a necessity!


  btw, whatever you do, do not try those Russian "ear candles". My wife made me try, but they are a really really bad idea.


 trust me . . . .

Ruh Roh . . . . .

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faganking

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,930 Member Since:20/01/2011

#110 [url]

Aug 24 12 10:54 AM

plugs on planes is a necessity!

  btw, whatever you do, do not try those Russian "ear candles". My wife made me try, but they are a really really bad idea.

 trust me . . . .

-strangeandbouncy

Peroxide does the trick. 23 years of doing it.

Benjy King www.benjyking.com

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bill mueller

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,350 Member Since:20/01/2011

#111 [url]

Aug 24 12 11:53 AM

plugs on planes is a necessity!

  btw, whatever you do, do not try those Russian "ear candles". My wife made me try, but they are a really really bad idea.

 trust me . . . .

-strangeandbouncy


Especially with an open Vodka bottle nearby.

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.

Posts: 1,503 Member Since:28/11/2011

#112 [url]

Mar 18 13 9:28 PM

Just read through this thread again in hopes of finding some encouragement and maybe to pick up a few tips.

I've been seeing an ENT to get to the bottom of an issue that's been plaguing me for quite some time. One of my ears feels permanently blocked, as though it never 'popped' after coming down from a flight. Some days it's better than others, but there's always this pressure on that side, and a sort of burning sensation near the ear. Doc says both canals and drums are clean and clear. Anyway, I had a hearing test today for the first time in ages. I thought for sure the hearing in that ear was going to be much worse, because that's what it feels like especially with headphones on, but when she showed me the graph both ears matched almost perfectly. Now I knew there would be a notch there, due to my early years of sound abuse, but I wasn't prepared for the results of the test at all. She called it a 'classic case' of noise induced hearing loss, moderate level. It's one hella notch. 

Between this eustachian tube that won't come unblocked and the exam results, I'm pretty bummed right now. 

Sorry for the venting. I needed to do it somewhere, what better place than an audio forum.

 "Real People, Real Performances."

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zakco

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,064 Member Since:02/03/2011

#113 [url]

Mar 18 13 9:45 PM

When I went for custom plugs a couple of years ago, they tested both ears and proudly showed me the results, which by their standards was considered within the "normal" range. I however found the results very unnerving. My left and right ears are quite different, with a considerable notch in one at 3kHz, which explained perfectly how they felt to me. Once I got past the initial shock and depression, I've become more vigilant about checking in mono and/or reversing the L/R signals while mixing, which seems to help.

Now I don't know exactly how severe your problem is Gio, but for me it hasn't kept me from doing what clients and peers say is the best work of my career. And while I absolutely agree with protecting one's ears, there is more to an AE's craft than having perfect hearing...(though it certainly doesn't hurt!)


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.

Posts: 1,503 Member Since:28/11/2011

#115 [url]

Mar 18 13 9:58 PM

When I went for custom plugs a couple of years ago, they tested both ears and proudly showed me the results, which by their standards was considered within the "normal" range. I however found the results very unnerving. My left and right ears are quite different, with a considerable notch in one at 3kHz, which explained perfectly how they felt to me. Once I got past the initial shock and depression, I've become more vigilant about checking in mono and/or reversing the L/R signals while mixing, which seems to help. Now I don't know exactly how severe your problem is Gio, but for me it hasn't kept me from doing what clients and peers say is the best work of my career. And while I absolutely agree with protecting one's ears, there is more to an AE's craft than having perfect hearing...(though it certainly doesn't hurt!)

-zakco

Thanks, Zacko.

One thing I'd like to investigate further ( just for my own curiosity) is the test methodology. Seems it relies a good bit on reaction time, which I don't think is very accurate. i.e.: I know on a few instances I would hear a tone but didn't press the button until after it bumped up to the next volume level. There has to be a more accurate way than that..

 "Real People, Real Performances."

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zakco

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,064 Member Since:02/03/2011

#116 [url]

Mar 19 13 12:48 AM


Thanks, Zacko.One thing I'd like to investigate further ( just for my own curiosity) is the test methodology. Seems it relies a good bit on reaction time, which I don't think is very accurate. i.e.: I know on a few instances I would hear a tone but didn't press the button until after it bumped up to the next volume level. There has to be a more accurate way than that..

-gio

You know, I had exactly the same thoughts during the test. There were frequencies where I was definitely slow to react and others where I'm sure I was momentarily distracted by things like my own breathing and slight rustling of the ear-pads against my skin/hair etc.

IMO, it would be interesting to take the test several times and average the results.

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weedywet

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,774 Member Since:20/01/2011

#117 [url]

Mar 19 13 12:54 AM

if you have a seriously 'bad' audiogram, the audiologist should repeat the test at another time.

I always feel that way about vision testing - i.e. that it's too subjective based on my responses... i want them to just be able to MEASURE it, passively.

but in truth, in both the case of hearing and vision testing, they see enough people that, if they're good, they should know how to do a reasonable assessment even given the variables.

they're not looking for tiny divergences... they're looking for big problems.

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.

Posts: 1,503 Member Since:28/11/2011

#118 [url]

Mar 22 13 10:17 PM


The odd thing to me is that the ear I'm having issues with actually showed to be more sensitive in the audiogram than my 'good' ear. It just doesn't feel that way to me when listening. 

The side that feels stuffed with cotton actually hears better than the other one. Interesting.

 "Real People, Real Performances."

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zakco

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,064 Member Since:02/03/2011

#120 [url]

Apr 2 13 12:57 AM




The odd thing to me is that the ear I'm having issues with actually showed to be more sensitive in the audiogram than my 'good' ear. It just doesn't feel that way to me when listening. 
The side that feels stuffed with cotton actually hears better than the other one. Interesting.-gio


I'm not sure whether this will help you or not, but I was recently reminded about the benefits of using a saline nasal rinse one of which is the clearing effect it can have on the ears during/after having an upper respiratory infection.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nasal_irrigation

I've been fighting off a lingering sinus cold and it's been really effective for me.







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