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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,500 Member Since:27/01/2011

#61 [url]

Jul 11 15 4:52 PM

ssltech wrote:
The white conductor in the above image looks like it's got 2-3mm of exposed conductor. the more exposed conductor you leave, the more chances of unwanted contact with other conductors. I like people to perhaps strip back a little less, so that the sleeve sits ALL the way next to the solder cup/contact.

Other than that, I echo that it looks fine.

Another way this may have happened, besides stripping it too far back is applying heat for too long and having the PVC jacket melt and pull back exposing wire. Not a big deal unless you are terminating cable for NASA or Boeing. If you make sure the tip is always "wet" when making a joint then you can apply heat for a shorter amount of time.

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John Eppstein

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,193 Member Since:31/05/2015

#62 [url]

Jul 11 15 5:14 PM

longscale wrote:
Use 63/37 multicore rosin (No clean) solder. The 63/37 (Sn/Pb) is a eutectic alloy; which means that the melting point is truly a melting point - not a range. Practically no plastic range. 60/40 solder on the other hand has a larger plastic range and you must be careful to not move the parts during cool down. I always use 63/37.

A good iron helps (I use a Hakko), as does a PanaVise and some magnification.

FINALLY somebody mentions this. If you use lead solder, use 63/37, not 60/40. 63/37 is a true eutectic and as such it has no "slush phase"; it goes directly from liquid to solid./ It also melts at the lowest possible temperature, which can be vital when doing delicate electronics and thin PCB traces. It will also give you a nice, shiny joint far more easily than 60/40, as what causes the dull surface is often either uneven cooling or minute vibration of the joint during slush phase.  It's a bit more expensive from many outlets but Amazon seems to sell it for the same price as 60/40.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,231 Member Since:04/02/2011

#63 [url]

Jul 12 15 7:17 AM

60/40; 63/37... I wonder how precise the ratios are. I've used both, to me both work well and I'm not sure I've personally noticed a great difference when talking about good brands like Kester.

brad allen williams

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christopher wilson

Silverado

Posts: 151 Member Since:31/01/2011

#64 [url]

Jul 12 15 11:56 PM

Good discussion, thanks for the tips, everyone!  What better way to respect the designs we've inherited from last century than developing excellent assembly practices?  To recap whats been covered since Crispin's post:

-Avoid exposed conductors by placing the shoulder directly against the solder terminal.

-Too much heat can melt, and pull back, a conductor's PVC jacket.

-A "wet" soldering tip facilitates heat transfer, allowing one to apply heat for a shorter time.

-63/37 solder has practically no plastic range and melts at a lower temperature.  This helps prevent component movement and uneven cooling.

-To develop exceptional soldering skills, work in a studio witn a Neve V3.

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seth

Ruby Baby

Posts: 5,536 Member Since:26/01/2011

#65 [url]

Jul 13 15 8:45 AM

christopher wilson wrote:
-To develop exceptional soldering skills, work in a studio witn a Neve V3.
 

Or solder your own 96-point TT patch bays, DB25 connectors, or discrete op amps.

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soapfoot

Ruby Baby

Posts: 7,231 Member Since:04/02/2011

#66 [url]

Jul 13 15 8:48 AM

seth wrote:
christopher wilson wrote:
-To develop exceptional soldering skills, work in a studio witn a Neve V3.
 
 
Or solder your own 96-point TT patch bays, DB25 connectors, or discrete op amps.
You can say that again! I've done all of the above. The 96 point TT patch bays (I think I've done about 4 or 5) were brutal!  I think I probably made my young eyes into old eyes on those jobs.
 

brad allen williams

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jimblair

Gold Finger

Posts: 676 Member Since:03/02/2011

#68 [url]

Jul 14 15 11:20 AM

seth wrote:

christopher wilson wrote:
-To develop exceptional soldering skills, work in a studio witn a Neve V3.

 

Or solder your own 96-point TT patch bays, DB25 connectors, or discrete op amps.

Or a large modular synth. Yep....THOUSANDS of solders.

Nanaimo, BC Canada www.facebook.com/ApeIslandSound

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ssltech

Aqua Marine

Posts: 4,044 Member Since:22/01/2011

#69 [url]

Jul 14 15 1:12 PM

soapfoot wrote:

seth wrote:
christopher wilson wrote:

-To develop exceptional soldering skills, work in a studio witn a Neve V3.

 

 

Or solder your own 96-point TT patch bays, DB25 connectors, or discrete op amps.
 

You can say that again! I've done all of the above. The 96 point TT patch bays (I think I've done about 4 or 5) were brutal!  I think I probably made my young eyes into old eyes on those jobs.


 

One HALF of the 28 x 96 point bay that I wired by hand a few years ago:

image

I wrote a thread over on GroupDIY with some guidelines to help make things easier:
http://groupdiy.com/index.php?topic=38497

Keef

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gold

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,500 Member Since:27/01/2011

#71 [url]

Jul 14 15 4:12 PM

I see it and think about what a relaxing time it would be. Like knitting. When I was doing them on a regular basis I'd estimate 20 hours per 96 point bay.

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John Eppstein

Platinum Blonde

Posts: 1,193 Member Since:31/05/2015

#74 [url]

Oct 8 16 9:30 PM

johnwhynot wrote:

I've given up trying to get shiny joints with the stuff, and just try to make them electrically and mechanically sound. -johnr

That sentence right there is the most reassuring thing I've heard all day.I was really stressing about the mottled finish on my solder joints in this most recent project.And I had also noticed that the 20W setting on my little Hakko was not sufficient to get the solder to flow on the PCB. It will work on jack and pot lugs. I have to button in the 135W setting, which raises the stakes considerably vis-a-vis time spent with heat applied to a component.Are there bootleg sources of leaded solder? NOS?

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chance

Aqua Marine

Posts: 2,637 Member Since:30/01/2011

#76 [url]

Oct 9 16 7:15 PM

I enjoyed that and I like that tip trick. I have always pronounced it sahder and I noticed he pronounces it as it is spelled

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zmix

Aqua Marine

Posts: 3,993 Member Since:20/01/2011

#78 [url]

Oct 10 16 2:23 PM

chance wrote:
I enjoyed that and I like that tip trick. I have always pronounced it sahder and I noticed he pronounces it as it is spelled

I've  wondered why Brits insist on that pronunciation of "solder", and it really comes down to "why would you", I mean, even if you could, should you?

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drknob

Gold Finger

Posts: 788 Member Since:02/02/2011

#80 [url]

Oct 11 16 8:43 AM

I'm trying to transition to lead-free solder, mostly due to safety concerns in my work environment. Although, at this point in my life, I'm not sure I can do much more damage to my brain with lead ingestion.
It's a bit of a learning curve, but with some practice, seems ok. But the joints never look as shiny. And rework can be a bit tricky.

Harold Kilianski

Music Industry Arts
Fanshawe College

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